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I've been riding on/off for over 20 years. I have always used both front and rear brakes together. I would say I used both brakes 70% of the time and 30% front only. Depends on the turn I'm taking. I find that applying both brakes slows the bike down with minimal weight transfer. My riding style on the street/highway/backroads is fast/hard and somewhat of a hooligan/maniac. Just being honest. On the track I ride at an intermediate pace. I haven't been on the track much but hopefully with my new bike that will change.

Now onto the rear brake. When I apply the rear brake I don't slam it down. I apply just enough to slow the rear wheel with the front. At times I may use it to help back me into a turn. Many times I will apply the rear brake right before applying the front brake then while applying the front I ease off the rear as the weight transfers and the rear gets light. Sounds like a lot of work but It's like a reflex. I just do it without even thinking about it.

This post is not to bash anyone's riding style. Just making conversation and looking to see if others use their rear brake with the front.
 

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I rarely use my back brake. Usually just for low speed maneuvering like lane splitting or riding around tight roundabouts when I only use the back brake and no front brake. I think using the back brake for normal riding adds an unnecessary input which serves to possibly upset the bike. Another use for the back brake is to tighten the cornering angle but I would only do that in an emergency situation.
 

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@stefanus hit on the one thing that use to be a problem in the older days. The rear would become upset with rear brake application. We can be go back to the days when the rear was still drum and the front was on disc rotors, that created a huge imbalance. We are taught from history. How did you do that? Regardless it was a complete change when the rear finally went disc so it matched the front alot better, there was still the dont touch the rear brake whatever you do.

Then there was the how brave are you rider. You go on track and you better come back in with a nice shiny rear rotor that showed no signs of application marks. The tease was on if you were caught using that rear brake.

now we move to the mid 2000's and the rear brake is all the sudden alive again with slide ways into the turn to help entry, and hold the rear brake to help in traction control. I can assure you I overheated many a rotor on the rear axle of a sprint car trying to get traction off the corner on a dry slick track. Same principle was used on motorcycles.

There is no shame in the rear brake application today. MotoGP as embraced it from the fact several new Moto2 guys came over to MotoGP and said, I want my thumb brake. rider do rider do. learn it love it embrace it.

I have the strangest use of the rear brake in most people's mind. Lift the rear and apply the brake hard enough the tire just skims and I can feel it in the petal I have done it so many times. Most likely is not slowing that bike down much since the tire is off the ground slightly, but, in my mind it is working to slow it, and it keeps the rear tire inline with the front. Its my thought and I am sticking with it.
 

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I find the rear brake useful as a second trailing aid for tight quick cornering to the front brake. The rear trailing lags the front but not for long and obviously gentler. I also use this method for the street, correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought BWM modulate the rear brake when the front is applied regardless?
 

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I find the rear brake useful as a second trailing aid for tight quick cornering to the front brake. The rear trailing lags the front but not for long and obviously gentler. I also use this method for the street, correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought BWM modulate the rear brake when the front is applied regardless?
The BMW does have linked braking based on mode. I have seen the chart, but I cannot tell you the numbers difference of Rain, Sport, Race, Slick.. Slick is not completely off, but, it is in the 95/5% numbers.

Then with RCK3 version I have offers a IDM Slick 1 and 2 mode for the ABS which turns off the ABS if the pump is still in place, or just cancels the code actuation is the ABS pump if removed.

Then in the 2020 the cluster menu's for Race Pro 1 / 2 / 3 offer ABS off to linked distribution ranges.
 

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Yes I should have referred to using the rear brake on the track but sliding the rear wheel is out of my league. Also on gravel using the front brake can bring the bike down.
 

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It depends on the rider, bike, street Vs track, road conditions, solo Vs 2up, and corner radius.
If you watch/listen to motoGP gods, some use the rear brake, others do not or rarely do.

I use the rear brake on the street frequently, rarely used it on the track (unless on gravel/grass or rear gets loose under hard braking, need to control it).
 

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Well just look at this video. Iannone abusing the rear brake.

Personally I have never used the rear brake, except when I run off track and you need to stop on the dirty stuff... Lately, I have found that applying the rear brake before you enter a turn on the track helps the bike to turn easier and also settles the rear when you are hard on the brakes. Only now I am experimenting with the rear brake to get faster on the track.

https://www.facebook.com/MotoGP/videos/2394000200846064/?v=2394000200846064
 

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I find that applying both brakes slows the bike down with minimal weight transfer.
Weight transfer does not care if you brake with rear, or front, or both brakes. Weigth transfer is caused by deceleration.
If weigth transfer is minimal, then also deceleration is minimal.

I ride track only, and I use front brake only on track, and rear brake only off track...
 

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I only use it once or twice a month to ensure it’s still there.

It’s simple - I’m not good enough to benefit from adding this to my routine when going fast.
 

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I believe it was Dylan Code on here that stated that a vast majority (80-90%?) of riders stop shorter using only the front brake. As mentioned above, in most modes the brakes are linked so most are using both thinking only front.
 

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If I'm making a 90 degree turn off a busy street with distracted drivers behind me, I'll use the rear brake to tighten my turn and get me on the side street quicker...avoiding, perhaps, being rear-ended by a chatty driver on her/his "smart" :)rolleyes:) phone.
 

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I've been known to use the rear brake... :nerd:



It has its purpose. I usually use it in entry to turns where maximum braking is required and/or braking down hill. Using both the front and rear will help the bike "squat" under braking vs front only where the weight transition down hill will tend to the lift the rear tire in an exaggerated fashion.
 

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I've been known to use the rear brake... :nerd:

It has its purpose. I usually use it in entry to turns where maximum braking is required and/or braking down hill. Using both the front and rear will help the bike "squat" under braking vs front only where the weight transition down hill will tend to the lift the rear tire in an exaggerated fashion.
Weight transfer does not care if you brake with rear, or front, or both brakes. Weight transfer is caused by deceleration.
If weight transfer is minimal, then also deceleration is minimal.

If weight transfer does not tend to lift the rear tyre, then deceleration is not maximal.
So when you play with rear brake and make nice rear slides, you are wasting time.
But yeah, it looks very nice.

One big issue might be too soft front springs, then bike will tend to the lift the rear tire in an exaggerated fashion, when deceleration is well below maximum.
 

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Using the rear brake is a step up on the scale, and I'm not sure it matters unless you race or are running up front on trackdays.

Me, I don't use it; I've got too much else going on in my head and the opportunity to screw something else up. In other words, my skill level is not good enough to know exactly how to modulate the rear brake without taking a good chance of hurting myself...
 

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Using the rear brake is a step up on the scale, and I'm not sure it matters unless you race or are running up front on trackdays.

Me, I don't use it; I've got too much else going on in my head and the opportunity to screw something else up. In other words, my skill level is not good enough to know exactly how to modulate the rear brake without taking a good chance of hurting myself...

I know that the Track org I coach for does not include using the rear brake in our novice classes...in fact we tell them to leave the rear brake alone and just focus on the front while in Novice. We don't teach trail braking either in Novice - just mention what it means...
 

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Me, I don't use it; I've got too much else going on in my head and the opportunity to screw something else up. In other words, my skill level is not good enough to know exactly how to modulate the rear brake without taking a good chance of hurting myself...
Amen brother!
 
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