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Discussion Starter #21
That must have been one hell of a hard hit to cause that much damage.

Seriously. I’m stunned every time I look at it now. This girl has the heart of a warrior though. Still up and running and I managed to fix the leak w/out replacing cases/engines/etc.

I just filled in the larger gap with enough sealant to get a “proper” seal and let it sit for 36 hours. Cleaned up the oily mess from before and then took it for several rides afterwards and it seems to be holding up well. If the issue should return, I will find a welder to be done with it once and for all.
 
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Thank you I will order that now. How would I know if the bike went out of timing I haven’t started the bike. Should I seal it then put the oil and start it?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I am having the same problem. What sealant did you use ? Please help 619-394-2966

I personally used some Mega Black gasket maker from VersaChem. I picked it up from a local auto parts store. Since I managed to actually dent the engine itself and create an even bigger gap between the engine and the timing cover, I applied more gasket to the affected area and allowed the gasket three full days from the time I applied it to completely dry.

I fixed the issue months ago and haven’t had an issue since.



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extending original thread.

I happened across this thread, and am in a similar situation (right lean low-side). Currently in the initial stages of repair/restoration (waiting for bits to arrive in the mail). I would like to ask how you popped off the cam chain cover after it was ground down so far? Will it slide off the bolts since the cover's holes are not threaded? Also, a novice question - does the engine oil need to be drained completely to do this work? Or is the oil behind the cover just overflow?

BTW, Any updates on the fix? Holding well?

TIA for any information you can provide.
 

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Watch out for damage to the dowels, if they are bent even slightly the new cover won't want to sit properly. No oil will come out, but make sure you remove all the aluminum bits, they can go straight to the oil pan from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
I happened across this thread, and am in a similar situation (right lean low-side). Currently in the initial stages of repair/restoration (waiting for bits to arrive in the mail). I would like to ask how you popped off the cam chain cover after it was ground down so far? Will it slide off the bolts since the cover's holes are not threaded? Also, a novice question - does the engine oil need to be drained completely to do this work? Or is the oil behind the cover just overflow?

BTW, Any updates on the fix? Holding well?

TIA for any information you can provide.
I apologize for the super late reply. I got exceedingly busy finishing up my degree, the passing of a friend, and the holidays.

Anyways, I imagine by now you’ve figured out how to get the cover off and install the new one. But for anyone else who might find themselves in a similar situation, the screws that are not damaged will come out normally. The screws that are damaged just need the heads popped off. You can rethread the holes if necessary. Once they are all gone, you can begin prying the cover off.

Personally, I used some string from a gutted 550 cord to break the adhesive between the cover and engine. It will be difficult to pull off if your dowel pins are bent. Difficult, but not impossible. It’s important that you don’t use any hard tools like a flathead screwdriver or the other end of a hammer or you will damage your engine further by making it hard to get a proper seal later. If you decide to use the string method as I did, get as much string as you can fit in the small gap up top. Then do the same thing at the bottom using new string. Make sure you use enough string that you can get a proper grip on both so you can pull the cover off evenly. Be sure to replace the pins with new ones afterwards.

I should also mention that I followed the official manual when taking off and putting on the new cover and that I’m no mechanic. My biggest issue when attempting this repair was getting a good seal as my crash had actually pushed the lower right side of the engine in (in regards to the timing cover). I was recommended a welder who could resurface the area for me, but I went with apply more gasket maker to that area and I’ve been riding ever since.

My bike, a 2016, is up to 60,000 mi and counting now. The crash happened over a year ago now. Ruby has been to the track as well as drag strip since then. I’m beginning to think of replacing the OEM clutch and brake rotors now due to mileage alone. I haven’t noticed any performance issues out of either though.
 
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As you have surmised, I was able to get through this mess. Got the cover off (learn from me - don’t use a screwdriver or any tool not designed to separate two flat surfaces).

Three bolts ground down. I used a bolt extractor (basically a funky drill that is cut backwards) with 66% success rate. Two bolts backed out ok. The last one was a real bugger and I drilled the pilot hole into the broken bolt (harder to do than I thought) for the extractor to bite. However, the pilot drill did not go in straight. The extractor bit into the bolt but the angle of attack was such that it couldn’t back out and it stripped and started to damage the threads for the original bolt.

Had to call in help. The shop split the bolt and took the pieces out with surgical precision. Rethreaded the hole, and all was good.



Used Owens Corning goopy seal as called out in the manual, and used SS bolts as supplied by Woodcraft (installed their cover). No leaks for the past 500 or so miles and many heat cycles.



One thing though. While drilling a hole into the shaft of the ground bolt, I broke a drill bit. I found the broken tip, but apparently it was not all. When I did the season’s final oil change, I found this...



I reconstructed the bit, so I know that there is no more drill bit shrapnel in the sump. I stuffed a rag in the opening but I still managed to get that much debris into the sump. Probably the bits that flew upwards and not onto the rag fell into the sump after a rinse from the oil.

Again, learn from my mistakes - take every precaution to keep stuff from getting into your motor.
 

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Let’s say someone low sides without any frame or case sliders on your bike and the bike slides a good enough distance to grind down your timing cover quite a bit. So much so, it may have even grinded through the cover and ate into the engine itself a little bit. Or even just a little nick.
They then replace the cover, apply some gasket maker, and torque new bolts into place, and then even wait a day or two for a good seal before starting the engine and riding again.
But it starts leaking, very slowly. Never enough to be concerned about the engine’s health, but enough that you occasionally have to clean up the mess on the bike itself, never the floor (no puddles, no drips). Is the engine now no good? Is there a solution to stop the leak?
Been there, done that.

I replaced it probably 3-4 times, if it leaks it means you didnt seal it properly, just re-do job.
 
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