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The BMW M1000RR is starting to get into customers hands in Europe! Europe tends to get new BMW’s released first before the US. If you’re one of the lucky owners, please contact us at [email protected]. We are offering a free flash for the first customer that can email us with one.

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Wow ! Super jealous.

I tried searching for any recently uploaded videos about the M1000RR on YT but found nothing. Any links we can oogle at?
 

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Nate Kern has had his for a while, he will showcase the K66 this month in the US. Expected availability to buyers in US April. Will be exciting to see it in track trim uncorked and what it does in WSBK.
 

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@bennymx
BMW did something right and put an underslug caliper :whistle: hopefully it won't leak.
 
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Maybe BMW_388 will be the first
That's a big no. Europe will have it first well before the states and when it does land in the states we already have a couple on order at major BMW hubs. We will definitely have it when it lands in the US but not as fast as Europe.
 

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Nate Kern has had his for a while, he will showcase the K66 this month in the US. Expected availability to buyers in US April. Will be exciting to see it in track trim uncorked and what it does in WSBK.
Unfortunately Nate's is actually a dummy test bike that will soon be going back to Germany to be melted down...He may be getting another production model but based on what he said when is saw him and the bike on 01/02, this one is going back...
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@bennymx
BMW did something right and put an underslug caliper :whistle: hopefully it won't leak.
Soooo, how is an underslung rear caliper better than the exact same caliper mounted on top of the rear disk? It's not mounted differently where there is a torque arm attached to the chassis below the swingarm to counter the squat when you use the rear brake. It appears to transmit brake torque right to the swingarm. Having the caliper on top, to me, means the wheel clears the brake caliper easier.
 

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Soooo, how is an underslung rear caliper better than the exact same caliper mounted on top of the rear disk? It's not mounted differently where there is a torque arm attached to the chassis below the swingarm to counter the squat when you use the rear brake. It appears to transmit brake torque right to the swingarm. Having the caliper on top, to me, means the wheel clears the brake caliper easier.
Probably just weight distribution, better to have it closer to the ground?
 

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It was really interesting hearing from Nate how hard they were required to push the bike during testing - 3 teams of 2 riders... each had to rack up 3000 “racing” Kilometers before they were done. Engineers crunching data on every lap - absolutely no room to lift or it would be called out - Nate described what an insane amount of pressure they were under each day for the week - enlightening conversation. I sure hope all the improvements translate into a competitive bike for this year’s WSBK...
 

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Soooo, how is an underslung rear caliper better than the exact same caliper mounted on top of the rear disk? It's not mounted differently where there is a torque arm attached to the chassis below the swingarm to counter the squat when you use the rear brake. It appears to transmit brake torque right to the swingarm. Having the caliper on top, to me, means the wheel clears the brake caliper easier.
Have you changed a wheel on an underslug caliper? Why do all race bikes have underslug calipers?
Lower COG, wheel changes are easier (dropping wheel into caliper than lifting it).
 
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Have you changed a wheel on an underslug caliper? Why do all race bikes have underslug calipers?
Lower COG, wheel changes are easier (dropping wheel into caliper than lifting it).
Most of my bikes had underslung calipers, more trouble changing the wheel. As far as lowering the CG, that would have such a miniscule effect as to not be noticeable. The bike wants to roll in the longitudinal axis about the axles of the wheels anyway because of centrifugal force anyway, the mass of the caliper is the same distance from the axle in both cases.

Maybe the newer underslung caliper mounts are better about changing the wheel, but on my older bikes it was always more trouble.
 

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Lower Center of Gravity + easier to remove / change out rear wheel (racing innovation carryover)
The change in CG would be next to nothing, and the bike wants to roll about a longitudinal axis thru the wheel axles anyway so I don't see that as a reason. If they have a better system now so that it's easier to change the wheel than older bikes where you had to loosen the brake torque arm and get all that out of the way, then it makes sense.
 

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The change in CG would be next to nothing, and the bike wants to roll about a longitudinal axis thru the wheel axles anyway so I don't see that as a reason. If they have a better system now so that it's easier to change the wheel than older bikes where you had to loosen the brake torque arm and get all that out of the way, then it makes sense.
the underslung is the best choice on the tire/wheel changes these days. You put a spring in the pin to pads and this helps to keep the pads apart, then the brake rotor will just drop right in and you are lined up with the swing arm so the axle can be inserted really fast.

The torque debate of how it applies the energy into the swingarm is yet again one of those well debated subjects. Does it lift, or does it squat is always the question. The CoG is like you indicate, MotoGP level of maybe it helps.

The K67 stock is not bad to get the caliper in and out of the swingarm / inner wheel area compared to the K46. The K46 was a nightmare if you are in a rush. The underslung is the only way to go on it. K66 is just an improvement to the K67.
 

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the underslung is the best choice on the tire/wheel changes these days. You put a spring in the pin to pads and this helps to keep the pads apart, then the brake rotor will just drop right in and you are lined up with the swing arm so the axle can be inserted really fast.

The torque debate of how it applies the energy into the swingarm is yet again one of those well debated subjects. Does it lift, or does it squat is always the question. The CoG is like you indicate, MotoGP level of maybe it helps.

The K67 stock is not bad to get the caliper in and out of the swingarm / inner wheel area compared to the K46. The K46 was a nightmare if you are in a rush. The underslung is the only way to go on it. K66 is just an improvement to the K67.
Yeah, on the older bikes the caliper always seemed to be in the way, and even if you pushed the pistons back in their bores all the way to help (as I did) the pads always seemed to tilt just enough to be a PITA. If they've got a better solution for that, then that's awesome.

Guess I never followed the designations, what is a 2015-2018? K67?

I wasn't buying the CG thing, it would be completely unnoticeable. There simply isn't enough mass there to make a difference, and when rolling a bike into a turn you're always mostly fighting the centrifugal force anyway. It's like a fighter aircraft in roll (as opposed to pitch and yaw), you want all the mass about the centerline.

I remember there was great debate over the years as to where was the best place to put brake torque. Considering the rear axle is always below the swingarm pivot, the bike is always going to want to squat upon applying rear brake no matter what you do because the bike's longest wheelbase is when the rear axle and swingarm pivot are in a plane parallel to the ground. Essentially, it's like a string being pulled taut. You could always have a lever from the caliper to a point on the frame ABOVE the swingarm pivot to use brake torque to counter squat, but that gets kinda hokey and complicated. Riders are USED to squat on the rear brake (I use it lightly in some turns to tighten my line), and I'd say it actually helps in hard braking by lowering the CG. I remember that rider feel was a big issue with alternative front ends on motorcycles, that even with the fancy front suspensions that tuned out dive, so "theoretically" the bike would be better, riders didn't like it and hated the feel, and were actually slower.
 

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Most of my bikes had underslung calipers, more trouble changing the wheel. As far as lowering the CG, that would have such a miniscule effect as to not be noticeable. The bike wants to roll in the longitudinal axis about the axles of the wheels anyway because of centrifugal force anyway, the mass of the caliper is the same distance from the axle in both cases.

Maybe the newer underslung caliper mounts are better about changing the wheel, but on my older bikes it was always more trouble.
Enjoy this thread Thumb Rear brake on track
 
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