BMW S1000RR Forum banner

61 - 80 of 94 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Anyone have tips for sharp switch backs or turns in blind corners? I am very slow in those, hwy 9 as an example leading into Push mountain, AR as a reference of tight stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,067 Posts
Push Mountain Road and Highway 9 are wonderful. AR is a beautiful state with many great roads. The lack of gravel shoulders is also wonderful as the apexes are almost always clean.

For me, two things. First, I accept these incredibly tight, blind corners are slow and should be on public roads without corner workers. Then I get my eyes up and look as far forward as possible where I want to go. It is easy to focus on what is directly in front of the bike at which point everything seems to come up fast. Looking ahead slows things down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
rear brake to help the bike turn, sit on opposite side of seat (i.e, turning right, side on left of seat to counter balance), turn handle bar all the way, clutch half engaged, some throttle, done. I'm amazed at riders who have been riding for so many years and they suck at U turns.

Best way to practice this is to do number 8 turns in a parking lot.
Seems simple enough, Idk why I didn't think of shifting the weight to the opposite side. Thanks for the info!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Here is a video that shows how smooth, modulated rear brake application can make a bike turn shaper on slow turns.

*Watch for the brake lights*


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Discussion Starter #67
Anyone have tips for sharp switch backs or turns in blind corners? I am very slow in those, hwy 9 as an example leading into Push mountain, AR as a reference of tight stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
This will have a lot to do with what you are looking at and when. Think about your eyes during those kinds of turns and see if you can break down and describe what you are looking at. What should you be looking at and when should you be looking there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
This will have a lot to do with what you are looking at and when. Think about your eyes during those kinds of turns and see if you can break down and describe what you are looking at. What should you be looking at and when should you be looking there?


I'm seeing hills around every turn, which is blocking view to see what the road looks like or what angle/steep the curve is. Every turn is that way on Hwy 9. As I am going around hill, the road view is obstructed by hills. No way around me being able to see far out. I feel the only way to be fast on roads like that is by memorizing every turn


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
I'm seeing hills around every turn, which is blocking view to see what the road looks like or what angle/steep the curve is. Every turn is that way on Hwy 9. As I am going around hill, the road view is obstructed by hills. No way around me being able to see far out. I feel the only way to be fast on roads like that is by memorizing every turn


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
don't outride your sight lines which is deadly

there is always room to improve with your vision, look for your next action point (turn-in, brake marker, apex) and as soon as you know you will hit that point look to the next one

you shouldn't be making line corrections mid turn even if you can't see all the way through. set your line conservatively so you can adjust if it decreases blindly or something else unexpected. even with conservative lines you can fly up and down 9
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,640 Posts
I'm seeing hills around every turn, which is blocking view to see what the road looks like or what angle/steep the curve is. Every turn is that way on Hwy 9. As I am going around hill, the road view is obstructed by hills. No way around me being able to see far out. I feel the only way to be fast on roads like that is by memorizing every turn
Bro I used to do Hwy 9 in triple digits. I got a couple of tickets there. Be sure you ride on workdays. In mornings many areas are damp, best to ride it in afternoon.

Yes, you need to ride it few times to get the hang of it, develop some muscle memory. There are a couple of turns if you're not ready you won't make it (assuming you're going fast). If you hang out at four corners, there are many riders that rest there. Try to meet some, follow ones that don't have chicken strips, I learned best by tailing fast riders. Don't follow smash adams, his chicken strips are wider then general Tso's chicken. >:) Best to get some track days to master the basics. CSS in March at Laguna, don't miss it.

As far as seeing through corners, read about vanishing point. Keep looking ahead. Watch out for a section where some cyclists are going by. Stay to left side of your lane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Discussion Starter #71
don't outride your sight lines which is deadly

there is always room to improve with your vision, look for your next action point (turn-in, brake marker, apex) and as soon as you know you will hit that point look to the next one

you shouldn't be making line corrections mid turn even if you can't see all the way through. set your line conservatively so you can adjust if it decreases blindly or something else unexpected. even with conservative lines you can fly up and down 9
THIS. There is always somewhere where you want the bike to end up that you can look towards. If you are trying to look too far ahead you can get lost, instead, focus on what is coming next. Look to the apex or where you want to be mid corner, once you know you are going to get there you can look towards where you want to exit.

What else could you look at to give you clues about what the corner is doing? What should you look at if it is blind and you can't see all the way through?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
THIS. There is always somewhere where you want the bike to end up that you can look towards. If you are trying to look too far ahead you can get lost, instead, focus on what is coming next. Look to the apex or where you want to be mid corner, once you know you are going to get there you can look towards where you want to exit.

What else could you look at to give you clues about what the corner is doing? What should you look at if it is blind and you can't see all the way through?
If I am riding around a blind corner I am taking an outside line for better visibility and looking as far ahead as possible. In other words, I'm constantly looking at the vanishing point to give me as much time as possible to react.


I Just keep looking where the corner is going until it opens up and I can see. Key is constant and smooth throttle until you can see the exit then straighten up and get on the gas. Lots of riders try to accelrate to early and run wide, or they have to chop the throttle and unsettle the front.
Yes, agreed.

Chopping the throttle closed at the wrong time can be just as bad as whacking the throttle open at the wrong time, something lots of people do not realize.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
902 Posts
What else could you look at to give you clues about what the corner is doing? What should you look at if it is blind and you can't see all the way through?
One trick I learned when riding/driving two lane twisty country back roads in Kentucky, is to watch the utility poles that carry elec and phone, they follow the road almost without exception.
Unless your just in a forest, you can almost always see some piece of it up ahead. With just a quick look I can basically which direction the corner is most likely going to be, how far it is and some idea of how sharp it might be, and I use that to set up my approach. Much better than just flying blind if you really don't know the road.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,640 Posts
If I am riding around a blind corner I am taking an outside line for better visibility and looking as far ahead as possible. In other words, I'm constantly looking at the vanishing point to give me as much time as possible to react.
Gotta watch out taking outside line on the street. Sometimes cars and other bikers in opposite lane go past the center line. With bad timing you would be screwed. I have learned to slow down around blind corners until I clear the opposite lane. Also taking outside line puts you at more risk if there is anything spilled on the road (coolant, oil, etc...). See a thread by me on Rt9 where there was some coolant spilled, my friend on r6 crashed (he was on outside line), I did not even though I was leading the ride (because leader bike >:))

I tend to stay about a third past the center of my lane (closer to outside line), but not all the way to give myself some buffer. This saved me on the drageon last year where a truck from opposite lane was about a foot over the center line in my lane. If I were far on outside line I would have been hit. Just leaned more and saved the day. It irks me seeing others riding so close to center solid line.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,617 Posts
z00 I think you're getting outside line confused. Outside line meaning as far to the left as possible (edge of the road) Not next to the centre line. The whole idea of being on the left is it gives you a better view of a blind corner and allows you to pick up the exit earlier. It also is safer because of oncoming vehicles being over the centre line in your lane and taking your head off with their bullbar. I tend not to worry about it to be honest. I am on the centre line with my head and shoulder in the other lane and have had to rip it up out of the way heaps of times to avoid losing my head. Then tip back in and continue. Staying inside provides me room in case I over shoot on entry. Obviously not what I should be doing. I normally run outside line on fully blind corners and slow down though. When I can see through its not a issue.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,640 Posts
Benny, outside line to me means the line far from the apex. Also, it does not make sense to me being closer to the edge (away from center) is going to provide better visibility into a blind corner. The farther away from the apex (horizontally) the more one can see into the corner. Being on outside line (edge as some call it in this case) will provide poorer visibility and sight into oncoming traffic.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,617 Posts
Also, it does not make sense to me being closer to the edge (away from center) is going to provide better visibility into a blind corner. The farther away from the apex (horizontally) the more one can see into the corner. Being on outside line (edge as some call it in this case) will provide poorer visibility and sight into oncoming traffic.
You pretty much just agree'd with me then disagree'd. If you are on the outside of a corner you can see further around due to the angle you are on. If you are on the inside you can't see through and around as much.
 
61 - 80 of 94 Posts
Top