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Discussion Starter #1
When riding, what is the situation or skill that you struggle with the most? Is it braking and downshifting, corner entry, visual skills, fighting survival reactions, riding in traffic? What situations do you find the hardest and why?
 

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Visual I'd say. Too often I catch myself not looking far enough ahead. And my feeling is because of that, it's the beginning of any problem to follow.
 

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tight transitions. my corner speeds on sweepers have always been good. late braking, good. but quick transitions and tight technical stuff have always been challenging for me.

Oh, and rain races...I am worthless. I either don't push hard enough or push too hard and toss it. I have a hard time feeling when traction is starting to go.
 

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Keeping the front end down and head-shake. I tend to have a fast wrist but I find that even if I baby it I still have to shift early so I can continue to accelerate fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Vision, it seems is something that comes up for a lot of people, and it makes sense. You are only as good as your visual skills so if they suck, well.....:D

So what kinds of things can you DO in order to improve your visual skills? It is just experience and riding time or are there things you can work on to make your visual skills better?
 

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Vision, it seems is something that comes up for a lot of people, and it makes sense. You are only as good as your visual skills so if they suck, well.....:D

So what kinds of things can you DO in order to improve your visual skills? It is just experience and riding time or are there things you can work on to make your visual skills better?
At the risk of sounding psyco-babbly, I think a zen-like approach to vision is necessary. When I flew airplanes, landing was one of the most difficult skills to learn...that is, landing well, as opposed to "planting" the airplane on the ground! :D The best landings occurred when vision was relaxed and "down the runway"...not tense and just over the airplane's nose. With cornering, I find the same holds true...the best corners happen when you are relaxed and non-fixated on any spot. It is odd, but in a car this seems to happen automatically, yet on a bike it's more difficult. If anyone can reconcile this paradox, they'll go a long way toward cornering efficiently, and that's what I am trying to do. Not try so hard. Or as Yoda would say: "There is no 'try'...there is only 'do'". :)
 

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At the risk of sounding psyco-babbly, I think a zen-like approach to vision is necessary. When I flew airplanes, landing was one of the most difficult skills to learn...that is, landing well, as opposed to "planting" the airplane on the ground! :D The best landings occurred when vision was relaxed and "down the runway"...not tense and just over the airplane's nose. With cornering, I find the same holds true...the best corners happen when you are relaxed and non-fixated on any spot. It is odd, but in a car this seems to happen automatically, yet on a bike it's more difficult. If anyone can reconcile this paradox, they'll go a long way toward cornering efficiently, and that's what I am trying to do. Not try so hard. Or as Yoda would say: "There is no 'try'...there is only 'do'". :)
Yoda was so right
 

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Vision, it seems is something that comes up for a lot of people, and it makes sense. You are only as good as your visual skills so if they suck, well.....:D

So what kinds of things can you DO in order to improve your visual skills? It is just experience and riding time or are there things you can work on to make your visual skills better?
I'm slowly getting better at it but the main vision problem for me continues to be not that I'm looking in the wrong place - I have no problem moving my head smoothly to stay way ahead of the action - but that I tend to unconsciously start moving the bike where I'm looking instead of continuing to my tip in point at the entrance, or to the apex when I'm looking at the exit. It's the drill CSS calls the 2 step. On my last track day I was actually saying it out loud - "look.....turn." For me, what makes this easier is some practice laps where I'm doing it right and getting the sight picture in my head of what the apex looks like at my tip in point - or what the exit looks like when I'm hitting the apex of my turn. So I guess since I know what I'm supposed to do and it's just making myself do it - I'd say repetition and practice is what I need to groove it.

Wes
 

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When riding the track and someone is wrecking in front of you. Happened a few times it is tough to keep your vision on your lines and not follow them off the track or into their wreckage


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For me it's the tight turns. I am fairly comfortable taking sweepers )at what I consider decent speeds)

But the tight spots is still a struggle. Although I am getting better.

Rain? Forget it. Lol
 

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Vission - from CSS

CSS level 2 Three Step and wide view drills cover this best -

Wide view deals with target fixation.. naturally, you will go where you're looking. The key is to use your peripheral vision more.. as was mentioned before, if the guy in front drops it, I still focus on where I want to go keeping the downed rider in my peripheral till I know I've cleared his accident.

Peripheral vision is also key to the three step vision to a corner

Three step -Looking at the right point at the right time is crucial to the smooth flow of information. Looking too close and you will feel rushed. Likewise, looking too far ahead and you will start to feel lost and lose your lines..
1. Look for your tip in point till you know you'll make it
2. using peripheral to keep your tip in point referenced. then look for your apex, again, only til you know you'll hit it
3. using peripheral to keep your apex in reference, look for your exit point

It will take practice and I suggest a track day or repeating this exercise on your favorite couple of curves over and over..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
At the risk of sounding psyco-babbly, I think a zen-like approach to vision is necessary. When I flew airplanes, landing was one of the most difficult skills to learn...that is, landing well, as opposed to "planting" the airplane on the ground! :D The best landings occurred when vision was relaxed and "down the runway"...not tense and just over the airplane's nose. With cornering, I find the same holds true...the best corners happen when you are relaxed and non-fixated on any spot. It is odd, but in a car this seems to happen automatically, yet on a bike it's more difficult. If anyone can reconcile this paradox, they'll go a long way toward cornering efficiently, and that's what I am trying to do. Not try so hard. Or as Yoda would say: "There is no 'try'...there is only 'do'". :)
I think this is an excellent approach and a good analogy. Your vision needs to be relaxed and looking ahead as well as out to the sides using your peripheral vision. I think too many riders concentrate too much on looking ahead and forget about challenging their eyes to see more of what is on either side of them. You can get really good as seeing more of what is around you in a relaxed manner when you practice and push your vision. Why do you think it is more difficult to control your visual skills while on a bike vs a car?

I'm slowly getting better at it but the main vision problem for me continues to be not that I'm looking in the wrong place - I have no problem moving my head smoothly to stay way ahead of the action - but that I tend to unconsciously start moving the bike where I'm looking instead of continuing to my tip in point at the entrance, or to the apex when I'm looking at the exit. It's the drill CSS calls the 2 step. On my last track day I was actually saying it out loud - "look.....turn." For me, what makes this easier is some practice laps where I'm doing it right and getting the sight picture in my head of what the apex looks like at my tip in point - or what the exit looks like when I'm hitting the apex of my turn. So I guess since I know what I'm supposed to do and it's just making myself do it - I'd say repetition and practice is what I need to groove it.

Wes
I hear you on this one as this is one of my own weaknesses in riding and I do the exact same thing as you, shout to myself, LOOK............TURN........ in order to get the head looking into the turn FIRST before steering the bike. When I do it my corner entry speed is much faster and there is less overall fear with riding. The more you practice looking into the corner before turning the bike the better you get at making it happen automatically, though there is nothing wrong with shouting at yourself inside your helmet ;)

Misti
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When riding the track and someone is wrecking in front of you. Happened a few times it is tough to keep your vision on your lines and not follow them off the track or into their wreckage


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
Yes, this is difficult for sure but what can you do to combat this reaction? Or rather what can you do to train your eyes to NOT stare at the guy wrecking in front of you?

CSS level 2 Three Step and wide view drills cover this best -

Wide view deals with target fixation.. naturally, you will go where you're looking. The key is to use your peripheral vision more.. as was mentioned before, if the guy in front drops it, I still focus on where I want to go keeping the downed rider in my peripheral till I know I've cleared his accident.

Peripheral vision is also key to the three step vision to a corner

Three step -Looking at the right point at the right time is crucial to the smooth flow of information. Looking too close and you will feel rushed. Likewise, looking too far ahead and you will start to feel lost and lose your lines..
1. Look for your tip in point till you know you'll make it
2. using peripheral to keep your tip in point referenced. then look for your apex, again, only til you know you'll hit it
3. using peripheral to keep your apex in reference, look for your exit point

It will take practice and I suggest a track day or repeating this exercise on your favorite couple of curves over and over..

Excellent points :) Kinda answers my above question... :cool:
 

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My best advice to anyone and everyone who rides is take a class if you can, you will be surprised at how much you learn and how many things you are doing wrong... Lots of great riding schools out there, just search the web..
 

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I find the bike sluggish to turn when under decently heavy throttle. Did a track day this year and found that part very challenging. Was fine in the corners both slow and at speed, but when coming out of corners at speed I found the front end unresponsive / slow (front wheel not in air).
 

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I hear you on this one as this is one of my own weaknesses in riding and I do the exact same thing as you, shout to myself, LOOK............TURN........ in order to get the head looking into the turn FIRST before steering the bike. When I do it my corner entry speed is much faster and there is less overall fear with riding. The more you practice looking into the corner before turning the bike the better you get at making it happen automatically, though there is nothing wrong with shouting at yourself inside your helmet ;)

Misti
Thanks Misti - I'll be at Barber at the end of May working on this with my CSS coach there.

The other thing I find challenging that I'll be working on is clutchless downshifts under hard/threshold braking. Blipping the throttle and holding steady or precise brake pressure has been elusive for me. I've been trying to work on this in my street riding but any real work will have to wait until the thaw here and some track time. Of course, if the school's new 2015 S1000RRs have the new pro-shift they'll be auto blipping for me - fun, but not necessarily helping me with my bike at the track :)
 

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I find the bike sluggish to turn when under decently heavy throttle. Did a track day this year and found that part very challenging. Was fine in the corners both slow and at speed, but when coming out of corners at speed I found the front end unresponsive / slow (front wheel not in air).
I'd guess your problem is that the rear tire is loading under throttle, and the front is unloaded.
Two ways you can approach this: your body position and bike geometry. changing your position is obviously easier to try. I like to think of pushing backwards on the footpegs to drive the rear tire into the ground on corner exit. This also forces my body forwards. Make sure you're keeping the upper body low will help reduce the wheelie tendency and help you load the front tire.

Bike changes are tricky, as changing any one thing has knock-on effects to other things, so I'd suggest finding a good suspension guy and pay him to help you.
Things I'd do: first, make sure your sag is right on both ends and have someone do a sanity check on your damping settings.
Then you could try lowering the forks in the triples (be careful, this will make it steer faster and increase chance of headshake I think).
Increase the rear ride height by flipping the upper mount if you haven't already.
Or perhaps try moving the rear wheel backward by lengthening the chain or changing sprockets.
 
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