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if we were in the pre-electronic aid era, no dtc/abs i would say absolutely don't get a liter bike.
Good post, but you cut a pretty wide swath with that statement. I had two pre-electronic aid era liter bikes, as you aptly put it--an '83 GS1100 and a '93 CBR1000F. Both were considered hot bikes in their day, but neither came remotely close to the S1KRR. Today, nearly all 600 class bikes will out perform either of them, I would think, just on engine power alone. The CBR was actually a gentle performer compared to our BMW, and I would not have a problem with a second-year rider riding it.

IMO, the biggest problem with the older liter bikes was not the lack of electronics or narrower tires. It was the weight! Both of my older liter bikes were in the 550 lb. class. Everything just works better on a lighter bike.
 

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Am I qualified for S1000rr

Hi guys,
Its been pleasure reading ur posts here. I am so much in love with this bike. Especially, with the search I've made towrds this bike. My biking experience is not much. I've owned 50-100 cc bikes when I was a kid. Also, owned a yamaha Vstar cruiser 1100cc which I returned to dealer the following day ( talking 10 yrs ago-didn't like it ) that doesn't count. But rented CBR 800 few times to fulfill my instinct. The reason I am on n off because my brother had a major car accident ( luckly surrvived after 3 months in comma )at that time. I am a good car driver owning few supercars Porches, lambo.
On the other hand, I consider myself a beginner in riding sport bikes due to short, minor experience.

I like Ducati, Aprilia, but adored the S1000rr's tech and the V4 symphonic sound ( It is a whole of bike=package ). Even though, most posts encourage new sport riders with a 600cc type. My intinct can't compermise anything for S1000rr. In my philosophy, extreme full speed is not the joy. Other factors could be; design, well built, sound, performance, tech...It is a passionate machine. Its a bespoke bike.

Life is precious to me espcially with my 2 kids, wife, and business. The question is, am I qualified for this bike ?

Regards,
 

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Life is precious to me espcially with my 2 kids, wife, and business. The question is, am I qualified for this bike ?
Hey Balamri,

Please look over my previous posts as the s1krr was my first bike ever.

In my opinion, in your case you have the following advantages:
* You are successful enough to have high end sportscars, therefore you probably make well calculated decisions.
* Because you are successful, you have a LOT to lose and therefore are less likely to take ridiculous risks.
* You have a family, which trumps any financial/career success you've had.
* You have a little history on bikes which means you probably can balance just fine.

I'd go for it. Getting a 600cc sportsbike in my opinion is more dangerous than the s1krr because the competition doesn't have all the safety tech the s1krr does. Trust me, you will need it.

My advice: Get what you want, in this case appears to be the s1krr. Make sure it has every safety feature available AND get frame/fork/barend sliders equipped at the dealership so if you have an accident in the driveway (which is likely) you won't pay out the wazoo for a new panel or exhaust pipe.

Also take a MSF or advanced riding course to get back in the swing of things (you can do this while waiting for the bike delivery).

Most importantly, stay out of anything but rain mode until you are comfortable with the bike. Stay out of race until you find yourself wanting better throttle response than Street mode offers.

Be smart and safe, proactive in traffic instead of reactive.

Stay away from minivans, PT Cruisers and Buicks. Only an idiot could buy one of the latter and minivan drivers buy them so they can pack in a ton of kids. Tons of kids = distracted driving.

Jon
 

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Hey Balamri,

Please look over my previous posts as the s1krr was my first bike ever.

In my opinion, in your case you have the following advantages:
* You are successful enough to have high end sportscars, therefore you probably make well calculated decisions.
* Because you are successful, you have a LOT to lose and therefore are less likely to take ridiculous risks.
* You have a family, which trumps any financial/career success you've had.
* You have a little history on bikes which means you probably can balance just fine.

I'd go for it. Getting a 600cc sportsbike in my opinion is more dangerous than the s1krr because the competition doesn't have all the safety tech the s1krr does. Trust me, you will need it.

My advice: Get what you want, in this case appears to be the s1krr. Make sure it has every safety feature available AND get frame/fork/barend sliders equipped at the dealership so if you have an accident in the driveway (which is likely) you won't pay out the wazoo for a new panel or exhaust pipe.

Also take a MSF or advanced riding course to get back in the swing of things (you can do this while waiting for the bike delivery).

Most importantly, stay out of anything but rain mode until you are comfortable with the bike. Stay out of race until you find yourself wanting better throttle response than Street mode offers.

Be smart and safe, proactive in traffic instead of reactive.

Stay away from minivans, PT Cruisers and Buicks. Only an idiot could buy one of the latter and minivan drivers buy them so they can pack in a ton of kids. Tons of kids = distracted driving.

Jon
Thanks alot Jon, for ur quick and informative reply. Also, for the encouragement. I will seriously look forward to pass my order to the local dealer this week. Certainly, I will attach pic of the bike in this forum when delivered.

wish me luck that it delivers at the earliest,

Regards,
 

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age makes a difference. You have 18 year old kids posting up, wanting one of these as their first bike...it's their life to lose.

Older, you tend to calculate risks far more thoroughly. I think it's from the MAIDS study, but the risk of dying on a bike versus a car is 2.5 higher in the 18-25 bracket, but drops to 1.2 times higher when you approach 40.

The S1000RR is a phenomenal bike, and unlike the 1098R I owned for two months, comfortable and a bike you can feel safer on. You can still easily kill yourself on a 200bhp bike, but there are just certain things and mistakes that are harder to do on this bike. You can still tuck in the front and lowside, but much less likely when you're on the brakes due to the ABS. You can still highside, but I've heard from some people, as well as experienced once myself, that the DTC does do a good job of stabilizing the bike. I lost the rear and knew as soon as the rear tire would grab, I would be thrown off. I just kept the throttle steady, the DTC light blinked like crazy, and the bike sorted itself out and got stable with very little drama.

I like the outrageously pornographic sound of a 1098 with full Termi exhaust and the tractor-like pull. The R version had everything except ABS that one would want. But for the price, it just wasn't worth keeping (in Korea, you can't get ANY damage insurance - you wreck, it's all out of your pocket regardless of circumstance...unless a car or truck has hit you, in which case you've got a lot more to worry about than the bike!).

Get the bike and enjoy it!
 

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The S1000RR is NOT a beginner's bike. I cannot fathom how people can say that it is 'safe' because of it's electronics. That is like saying a person who just got their drivers permit is 'safe' in an Ferrari F430 because of it's advanced electronics; it makes no sense whatsoever.

Go get yourself a used SV650 or an EX250/500, take an MSF course & learn how to ride on a truly safe machine given your limited capabilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The S1000RR is NOT a beginner's bike. I cannot fathom how people can say that it is 'safe' because of it's electronics. That is like saying a person who just got their drivers permit is 'safe' in an Ferrari F430 because of it's advanced electronics; it makes no sense whatsoever.

Go get yourself a used SV650 or an EX250/500, take an MSF course & learn how to ride on a truly safe machine given your limited capabilities.
For what it's worth....My first sport car...with no prior sport car experience was a 911 Carrera 4 (997)....I moved to an Audi R8 1 year later. So you could say I kinda jumped into sport cars both feet in. I wouldn't of wanted a Mustang or Nissan 350 (not that there's anything wrong with either) because I was simply not interested in that type of vehicle.

I would never buy an EX250 (not that there's anything wrong with an EX250).

On the other hand, I do understand where you're coming from and started this thread to get an overall feel on what the opinions would be....so far...the majority seems to say...go for it!! Let's see if more people will chime in.

I've already placed the order for the S1K...so that's done...but I do respect the opinions of experienced riders who already own this bike...so keep it coming.
 

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(I currently own a 2008 BMW X5 4.8) and saw the S1000rr....love at first sight.
I realize I should possibly start on something smaller but my rational is that I'm not a high performance car driver with fast car experience...but if I could afford it...I'd get a Ferrari. Using that logic to bikes I decided to go with the s1000rr.
For what it's worth....My first sport car...with no prior sport car experience was a 911 Carrera 4 (997)....I moved to an Audi R8 1 year later. So you could say I kinda jumped into sport cars both feet in.
I've already placed the order for the S1K...so that's done...but I do respect the opinions of experienced riders who already own this bike...so keep it coming.
So good of you to give us your car buying history and how that affected your motorcycle decision. That prompts me to wonder what use you put your Porsche and Audi to if you don't consider them high performance cars? Were they just cars you drove on the street for transportation and didn't explore their performance potential? Will the same apply to the S1000RR? I'm sure you will enjoy your look on the S1000RR in any case. The risks you take are controlled by your right hand, no matter the power of the bike you're on.
 

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Do you think 24 year old kids can push F-16s, F-18s and Harriers to their potential? Why does the US govt let kids fly such agressive aircraft?

F-16s have much more safety technology than a Cessna 182, is there anything that a F-16 has that would make it less safe than a Cessna given a mature operator? (considering the statements made earlier)

Owning and operating a s1krr isn't a right of passage, some of you guys should ease off it. All of us have to grow into our bikes, some more than others...don't get all ITG because someone has more growing to do than you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
So good of you to give us your car buying history and how that affected your motorcycle decision. That prompts me to wonder what use you put your Porsche and Audi to if you don't consider them high performance cars? Were they just cars you drove on the street for transportation and didn't explore their performance potential? Will the same apply to the S1000RR? I'm sure you will enjoy your look on the S1000RR in any case. The risks you take are controlled by your right hand, no matter the power of the bike you're on.
Sorry...didn't mean to come across like I'm trying to showcase what cars I own! My posts were in context...not just randomly sharing this information...hope I didn't offend you by indirectly implying I have expensive tastes in vehicles.

And yes..they were just cars for transportation...never tracked any of them. I had the opportunity to open them up here and there when I felt it was safe to do so but never felt the need to hit a racetrack. That's just me...to each his own. The S1000 will be the same..I'll enjoy the bike without the need to drive it like I'm on a racetrack. The looks and overall driving experience will be enough 90% of the time...after owning it for a while...when I've learned to feel comfortable...I may consider looking into more out of the S1...
 

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Do you think 24 year old kids can push F-16s, F-18s and Harriers to their potential? Why does the US govt let kids fly such agressive aircraft?
Possibly less chances of them having a family and kids (to think about).
Probably less fear (due to Wisdom) than as you get older.
Fast processing of the mind... as you get older, the mind can slow.
Easier to train a new dog than and old dog - new tricks...

Not that there isn't advantages to pilots that older too... but these were just some thoughts that entered my mind when you asked.. so JMO... :eek:
 

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Do you think 24 year old kids can push F-16s, F-18s and Harriers to their potential? Why does the US govt let kids fly such agressive aircraft?

Probably because they're younger kids and have great reflexes, they're generally not your average Joe (above average intelligence I suspect), and they get a whole bunch of training before they're turned loose in a jet :rolleyes:.

As far as the SKRR goes (imho) it's not the best bike for a beginner, as I think there are many lessons better learned with less power available. It's true your right wrist can control many things, but as there's a lot more to learning how to ride than simply throttle control, why risk such an expensive machine learning the basics? There's a lot more to learn than can be covered by the electronic aids, and something like an SV650 for a first bike would get my vote (if it mattered.) While I've been riding for over 42 years, I still learn something new nearly every time I ride.

Having said all this, a mature, careful person can probably get away with the SKRR as a first bike, if luck is also on their side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Some of the responses here have me a little worried about my decision!

I trust myself...and at 41 years old..I'm young at heart but certainly not immature.

Having said that...I take it a lot of you here are very experienced riders and I do respect your opinions.

The idea of starting out on something much smaller wasn't appealing to me as this was in part what some might call a "mid life crisis" purchase.

I've always loved bikes and started in the late 80's with a Yamaha RD350...then a RZ350...then a 90 something RZ500 and finally a FZ750. I rode around 5 years in total and stopped. Also, while living in Europe for 6 years...I rode a few enduro type 125 and 250's with the occasional moped (I know....I said moped!! lol)

This purchase was driven by my attraction to a "superbike" and not a "starter" bike. If you're in your 40's and have some disposable income and decide to get a sport car...boat....or any other big toy...it is expected you'll get something pretty flamboyant!

Unfortunately...I don't have any friends that ride bikes....but if I did and one of them said they highly advised against getting this bike to start...I'd listen.

I don't know any of you and some comments may be made based more on the fact that you feel like a new rider doesn't "deserve" such a nice bike to start as they had to work their way up to the S1K...not sure...but if some folks here can make some solid arguments I'm all ears and honestly do appreciate the feedback....just please...refrain from flaming me or being abrasive (not that anyone was...just saying)

Thanks to everyone so far.
 

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The responses you got are indicative of the question you asked... in other words, you'll get a wide variety of answers some for it , some against it, some with qualifying statements etc.

My suggestion to you would be this... and this would be independent of what bike you choose/chose/or plan to choose...

You can find some great books on riding these bikes. Read "Twist of the Wrist" by Keith Code... I just finished up Twist of the Wrist II and could read it again. MANY great tips in the books. Some you probably won't understand till you get your new bike out onto the street. Next suggestion would be to go to a track school - plenty good ones to choose from out there. And finally, the biggest thing above all the rest that I'd recommend is make every attempt to get to the Track sooner than later. Not to become some track superstar, but because you will learn SO MUCH MORE in a couple/few days of track riding than you will in years of riding on the street (take my word for it - it's true!). The guys at the track are also more than willing to help you out. I put off (for a long time) going to the track... I had every excuse under the sun... bottom line I was intimidated... Don't be fooled, your first day will be intimidating but you'll quickly get over it due to the comradery in the pits. You'll make new friends too. It took me having a nasty wreck on the street to finally admit to myself that I NEEDED to get to the track. I had so much to learn. It's been great ever since... the problem now is, I'm addicted to going back to the track :eek:

Bottom line, get to the track!! It will accelerate your learning soooo fast!! Everything you learn there will carry to the street!
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
The responses you got are indicative of the question you asked... in other words, you'll get a wide variety of answers some for it , some against it, some with qualifying statements etc.

My suggestion to you would be this... and this would be independent of what bike you choose/chose/or plan to choose...

You can find some great books on riding these bikes. Read "Twist of the Wrist" by Keith Code... I just finished up Twist of the Wrist II and could read it again. MANY great tips in the books. Some you probably won't understand till you get your new bike out onto the street. Next suggestion would be to go to a track school - plenty good ones to choose from out there. And finally, the biggest thing above all the rest that I'd recommend is make every attempt to get to the Track sooner than later. Not to become some track superstar, but because you will learn SO MUCH MORE in a couple/few days of track riding than you will in years of riding on the street (take my word for it - it's true!). The guys at the track are also more than willing to help you out. I put off (for a long time) going to the track... I had every excuse under the sun... bottom line I was intimidated... Don't be fooled, your first day will be intimidating but you'll quickly get over it due to the comradery in the pits. You'll make new friends too. It took me having a nasty wreck on the street to finally admit to myself that I NEEDED to get to the track. I had so much to learn. It's been great ever since... the problem now is, I'm addicted to going back to the track :eek:

Bottom line, get to the track!! It will accelerate your learning soooo fast!! Everything you learn there will carry to the street!
That's some great advice....I'll look into track days/training locally and see what I can find. I've already signed up for a course at the Rider Training Institute here in Toronto for some of the fundamentals and will definitely look into further training. I'll also hit Chapters and look for the book you mentioned.
 

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I've posted my view on this previously, on the assumption that you are mature and have a head on your shoulders, which you seem to.
I don't live in the US,
My opinion.. if you are young, loaded and "cool", you have a high chance of killing yourself on a bike like this, based on inexpierience, immaturity or invincibility.
if you're older, common sense should prevail and you would treat this bike with respect and ride within your abilities.
Now.. the issue, This machine IS the most highly rated stock racing street bike in the world at the moment, full of technology, features and design and no matter how good you think you are, this machine is better.
If you are inexpierienced, out of practice, no matter what you are riding, you may put yourself at risk, with this machine it coud be be over sooner.
I would not advocate a "young fella" to get one of these.
If you are mature, you are probably buying a dream, technology, and should be scared shitless of it rather than "invincible" and dead.
60mph on a BMW or a 250cc bike is relevant to your ability to ride safe and aware, enjoy the technology under your arse,
but be aware, this bike can take you waaay beyond ... you don't get a choice, second chance, you don't get to think, Keith Code's books won't help you now.
Like I've stated, get it, Enjoy, but use it within your "mature" limits, assuming you know what they are.
 

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Some of the responses here have me a little worried about my decision!

I trust myself...and at 41 years old..I'm young at heart but certainly not immature.

Having said that...I take it a lot of you here are very experienced riders and I do respect your opinions.

The idea of starting out on something much smaller wasn't appealing to me as this was in part what some might call a "mid life crisis" purchase.

I've always loved bikes and started in the late 80's with a Yamaha RD350...then a RZ350...then a 90 something RZ500 and finally a FZ750. I rode around 5 years in total and stopped. Also, while living in Europe for 6 years...I rode a few enduro type 125 and 250's with the occasional moped (I know....I said moped!! lol)
In my opinion go for it. You are putting a lot of thought into this and have the right attitude. I don't have a S1000RR yet - I have a F800ST. I also had RD350 and RZ350LC in the past ;)

I actively ride every weekend but I would put it into rain mode and get the feel of it. Then switch it up whenever it feels good to move on. That could be 1 day or weeks depending.
 

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A lot of folks will say, don't do it. Its not a good choice for a first bike! But I am not one of them. If you want to do it, do it and buiild your skills up the bike over time.
 

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Congratulations on your purchase, the S1K is an awsome motorcycle.

Your situation reminds me of when I bought my 2005 GSXR-1000. At the time, it was the fastest bike on the planet. I was racing motorcross on a CRF450, hadn't ridden a sport bike in years, and had some of the same concerns you are having.

A couple of my friends raced motorcross bikes with me, but also raced sportbikes. They convinced me to get a sportbike. With my ego being what it was, I sprang for the fastest available bike.

I took it to the track where I humbly absorbed every bit of advise that they gave like a sponge. It didn't take long, under their tutalage, to get up to a "fun" pace (they were both champions in their respective classes so I wasn't going to impress them too much).

1000RR is correct, 100% of the experience gained on the track transfers to street riding.

My advice is to ride your bike respectfully. Get to the track ASAP. Be very calculated and slowly increase your speed as your comfort level increases.

If you don't disrespect the S1K, it's like a warm furry little kitten.
 

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If you can restrain yourself, it's an easy bike to ride easily. It's a great bike to ride hard.

Be sure you are comfortable with bar/seat/peg ergs.
Perfectly said. It's not my first bike but I last rode 17 years ago so it might as well be. Couldn't be easier to ride. Just use prudence with that right wrist.
 
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