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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's the deal...I'm 41 years old and haven't been riding for a very long time. In my 20's I owned a couple of bikes...bought my first bike (Yamaha RZ350) when I was 18....owned a FZ750 back in the early 90's..and rode bikes while I lived in Europe in the 90's as well.

I haven't been riding for a very long time but rode enough in the past to know how to ride a bike. Not that I consider myself a true "rider" just someone with a decent knowledge of riding bikes.

I was at my BMW dealer a few days ago (I currently own a 2008 BMW X5 4.8) and saw the S1000rr....love at first sight. Came home and decided to buy it!

I realize I should possibly start on something smaller but my rational is that I'm not a high performance car driver with fast car experience...but if I could afford it...I'd get a Ferrari. Using that logic to bikes I decided to go with the s1000rr.

I'd like to point out I'm 41 years old and have two kids...I'm a pretty level headed guy and have a little need for speed but love my kids too much to jeopardize my life.

What are your opinions with the s1000rr for someone who's not a very experienced rider like myself....?
 

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It will only go as fast as you tell it to, in rain or sport mode it will look after you a damn sight better than most bikes out there and you have lots of headroom to grow into.

If you think you have a tendancy to throw caution to the wind once you've thrown your leg over a bike then you might want to look at something a little tamer. I'm no trained racer either and I find it easier to ride than my Kawasaki ER-6f
 

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Good for you :)

Makes me chuckle when people buy supersport 600s as they are safer than 1000s. They are not They still do 170mph plus and you have to rag the teets of them to make them move.

The BMW is only as fast as you ride it...:cool:

Enjoy it.
 

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This bike goes 127 mph in third , so be ready to get going fast and tires and brakes are gone close to 3,500 miles the 600cc bikes are better on gas and tires and brakes .
 

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I say buy what every you want it's your $$$. all though I do hate when people post up they own a BMW car as if it's some sort of "wink wink, I'm in the family" a car is a car, you may as well own a "Chevy Cruz" for all I care.

But I am a fan of starting on a smaller bike like a 600 for many reasons, sure a 600 will do 170 but it gets there a hell of a lot slower! and time and distance (or lack of the ability to properly judge) is what gets ALOT of new riders hurt or worse!

2nd there lighter and less tiring for newer riders who still white knuckle the bars and have a hard time relaxing

3rd they build confidence much faster for a new rider due to ease of flick-ability and less power to the ground to have to deal with. it's easer to deal with 112HP spinning up a rear tire in a turn then it is to deal with 180hp trying to kill you in that turn


just my.02 cents
 

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If you can restrain yourself, it's an easy bike to ride easily. It's a great bike to ride hard.

Be sure you are comfortable with bar/seat/peg ergs.
 

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Go for it. I'm 55 years old and bought one in August. After 30 plus bikes in my life, mostly cruisers, it's by far the favorite I have ever owned. Just wish the snow would stop in the Northeast, US.
 

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Agreed, look at the guys in these pics. My BMW dealership said they also sold one to a guy who was in his low 70's. I'm not sure if this is the same guy or not but he's at least in his 60's.

The Country Rode Gallery

Another "senior s1krr rider"

http://countryrode.com/main/gallery.php?p=197

If I can handle this bike as my first motorcycle and these 50+ guys can ride them, I'm sure you'll do fine with it as your first refresher bike. Just keep DTC on and stay in street mode until you get really familiar with the kind of power it has. Race mode is MUCH more touchy than street mode, took me a few weeks to get used to the throttle sensitivity.

Even in my low 30's I find the bike comfortable as long as I'm moving around. Highway driving is hell for me, I have no idea how old timers' do it.
 

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Last Bike I owned was a 93 GSXR 750. Sold it in 95 or 96 before birth of first

child ( i have 2 ). A 600 Suzuki katana before that. I'm 39 now. I had no

intention of owning another motorcycle ( but secretly yearned for a bike all

these years). I bought fast sports-cars over the years to make up for the lack

of a motorcycle. I currently have a 3rd gen Viper convertible. Awesome, very

fast, very agressive, wind in your hair... Still... somethings missing.

I now know what's been missing... I will rectify in the spring...

Oh, Hello All, Great bunch here by the way... The wait is not easy though
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Done! I placed my order! The bike will be here in April....which works out fine considering I'm in Canada and the weather won't be right for riding until that point...even may...the wait is gonna be tough!
 

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The S1000RR was my third bike. The first was a 50cc scooter and the second was a 250cc Ninja. I am a very thoughtful and cautious guy and I felt comfortable with my decision. Here is why.

Many people encourage you to work your way up in engine power as you gain experience. They never really specify how long you should spend at any given power level though. If you look at the break-in period for the S, you will see it provides its own ladder of power levels to the user.

I will state without proof that engine power is very linear in terms of RPM once you get out of the idle range and before you hit peak power. So the break-in limit on RPM is a very nice power limit too. Also, rain mode cuts power by 20% or so throughout the RPM range. The fact that the modes limit throttle response progressively is yet another benefit. So let me guesstimate effective engine displacement as you break in your new bike:

First 300 miles, limit to 5000 RPM and
Rain mode: 55 hp or so (like a 500 cc bike)
Sport mode: 70 hp or so (like a 650 V-twin bike, peak, not delivery)

300 - 600 miles, raise limit to 9000 RPM
Rain mode: 90 hp or so (like a big V-twin bike, peak, not delivery)
Sport mode: 120 hp or so (like a 600 cc bike)

after break-in:
Rain mode: 150 hp or so (like a typical literbike from yesteryear)
Sport mode: 193 hp (YEAH!)
Race mode: Throttle modulation is key!
Slick mode: when you are ready.

All hp numbers are speculative, and the bike comparisons highly speculative. The only point of this is to show you how you end up spoonfeeding yourself the hp and end up breaking *yourself* in as well. With the electronic safeguards, I felt very comfortable with my decision.

For those wondering, my dealer suggested the 5k limit in the first 300 miles, implying that was the guidance from BMW corporate. I didn't believe that, but for the reasons above, I decided it was a good idea to comply, and I laddered my access to the different modes at 150 mile increments. Like I say, I'm a cautious guy. In the spring, I'll follow a similar procedure (with shorter increments) to get accustomed to the bike again.

Enjoy your bike when it comes in! I sure love mine.

- John
 

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sounds like you got the right mindset

if we were in the pre-electronic aid era, no dtc/abs i would say absolutely don't get a liter bike. if there was a good 600 naked or supersport that had both dtc and abs i would say go small. this bike is one the safest bike on the market, but it is very easy to feel like superman on this bike. that is when stuff happens. if i was so damned addicted to bikes (over 45 years) i would say buy a sports car, but there is no car that can thrill like a fast bike. enough bullxxx.
get a sensible and very competent buddy to ride with, one that really knows how to ride/teach and knows every way a cager can kill you. read everything you can to improve your skills. do most of your riding early saturday and sunday mornings, at least for a few months. after you get some seat time, practice the skills you have been reading about: counter steering, hard braking, late apexing, etc. the thing i enjoy really enjoy about biking is that you can and should become better everyday you ride.. , but you have to work at it. since you mentioned your kids, tape a small picture of the 2 of them right next to your speedo. that might slow you down. thought that technomancer's post was good advice. make your own "good luck "on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lots of really good advice on this thread! Funny enough, I had planned on taping a picture of my kids next to the speedometer!! I think that will be the greatest safety feature the bike will have!

I feel that the safety features of this bike along with my love for life will keep me in check...I really appreciate the amount of power this thing has and feel intimidated by it.

I'll take baby steps with it and take my time to learn to truly get a real "feel" for it before I even consider exploiting the power in a safe environment (maybe a track in the future).

In the meanwhile.....I have the biggest smile on my face everyday at the thought of driving a S1000RR this summer!! Wow...I'm blessed!

I'll make sure I post some pics when I take delivery.:D
 

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I have to add my view here, just because you posted..
I got my S1000rr because I could, I sold three bikes to get it, as the plan was not to have to dip into my pocket.
I'll never profess to be able to ride it, but as my friends say, It's yours, you own it.
I'm probably caught in the "You don't race bikes, what or who do you think you are buying that"
But where I live, If you are young, Insurance dictates what you ride, so most young people would never get one of these.
So I have one, I can do what my life expierience enables me to do, and that includes common sense.

I've gone through 11 bikes and havn't come off YET. I pin every one of them ('cos I'm sensible and only do it when I'm sure all is good and expierience does help)
Glad your gettin it, so long as you retain some of the knowlage that this bike will probably be better than most of us will ever be, as your other choice would be to leave the money in trust and wish you did... ENJOY
Lots of really good advice on this thread! Funny enough, I had planned on taping a picture of my kids next to the speedometer!! I think that will be the greatest safety feature the bike will have!

I feel that the safety features of this bike along with my love for life will keep me in check...I really appreciate the amount of power this thing has and feel intimidated by it.

I'll take baby steps with it and take my time to learn to truly get a real "feel" for it before I even consider exploiting the power in a safe environment (maybe a track in the future).

In the meanwhile.....I have the biggest smile on my face everyday at the thought of driving a S1000RR this summer!! Wow...I'm blessed!

I'll make sure I post some pics when I take delivery.:D
 

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check out sportrider "special edition"

as i said in another post, read as much as you can, then practice those hone those skills. i just picked up a "special edition" of sportrider mag. it has "23 street and track skills you can master". i was not going to buy it, but decided i needed to refresh my memory and continue to utilize these techniques everytime i ride. it was 5.99, think it is only a newstand special. keith code and nick ienatsch have published books on riding. think i have 2 of codes,' one of nicks'. i read them cover to cover, definitely worth the time and money.
 

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all though I do hate when people post up they own a BMW car as if it's some sort of "wink wink, I'm in the family" a car is a car, you may as well own a "Chevy Cruz" for all I care.
I was riding motorcycles long before I learned to drive a car. Yamaha DT50, Honda XR80, Honda XR200, Kawasaki KLR250, Honda XR600, Kawasaki KX500, Honda CR500, 2 x Honda CRF450s, Honda CBR600, Suzuki GSXR-1000, and now a BMW S1000RR. I consider myself a motorcycle guy.

I own a BMW 135i and I think it may be a BMW thing... kind of like a sub category. Yes, a car is a car and a bike is a bike, but a BMW is a BMW whether it's a bike or car.

I love my BMWs. I got military discounts on both. Picked up my car for $33K and put $1200 into it (catless downpipes and a JB3) and now it's making 370hp/370 tq to the rear wheels... fun! It's kind of tough to describe, but for the price I paid for this light, compact, semi-luxurious, perfect 50/50 weight distribution, rear wheel drive, 6 speed manual, twin turbo charged little beast makes me feel like I got away with something!

Between the S1000RR and the 135i, BMW has earned my respect & money. I smile, like an arse, no matter which one I take to work. :p

If you go over to the BMW car forums, we share some of the same postings (like the Aerial Atom vs S1000R episode) and those guys definitely take pride in the S1000RR whether they own one or not.
 

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keith code and nick ienatsch have published books on riding. think i have 2 of codes,' one of nicks'. i read them cover to cover, definitely worth the time and money.
+1
I reread these and lee parks total control book on a periodic basis.

OP: my story is similar. Rode in the 80's. Stopped. Rode again on an 83hp sport tourer in Europe for a year or so, and got back into it. Moved to California, and had to select a new bike. I was leaning toward a 600 w/ ABS, but then found the S1K. I was scared by the 1000cc, but I went for it. The power made me careful and respectful. The modes let me pick the "bike" appropriate to the conditions and my mood. I started mainly in sport, but now use mainly race. Rain for rain of course. I have yet to engage slick. Also the linear power delivery made it very predictable. The geometry and weight are 600 like. And the dtc and race abs are the extra insurance I need. I'm now 7 months and 4000 miles in, all essentially in the twisties, with some short distance commuting, and I have never regretted it. It's a great bike. Tame if you want, and well, not if you want. Oh, I have a teenager as well.

You have to make up your own mind, but I'm glad I went for it!

FWIW. YMMV

EDIT: just saw I missed the post where you said you put in the order. CONGRATS!
 

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Hi,

I'm going on 62 this summer and never had a Superbike before I bought my Ducati 1098 R in '08 and my S1000 RR in April.

I somehow managed to ride the S 1000 RR in Rain mode for about 1000 miles before I realized it.

I thought it was wimpy compared to my Ducati , which I ride like the wind .

Then one day at the gas station I happened to look down and noticed I was in Rain mode and switched to RACE and .....WOW.....night and day !

It's a screamer .

I ride only in the hills and forests of and usually between 60-85mph , w, some bursts to 120 mph. or faster if the road stays straight long enough.

I think if you start off in RAIN mode for the 1st 1000 miles and then swithch to STREET for a couple hundred and then go to RACE you should be fine.

The bike is wicked fast like my 1098 R.



 
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