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This rumor mill sounds like the kinda BS ppl throw even 2 days before the new iPhone release. None of this speculative sh*t is gonna stick until the real deal is out.
Sounds like you're bought and paid for by the Japanese Industrial Complex

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Kidding. It's fun to read all this speculation.
 

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My Gixxer isn't crippled like the American BMWs are.

Since you've never even ridden the Gixxer that I own back to back with American BMW like I have, why don't you post proof that OEM vs OEM, the Gixxer is down on power to the American BMW. Cuz thats not my experience in the real world.
So are you telling me that your American Gixxer made like around 190 RWHP in stock form like the BMW? So all the tuners Dynos Ive seen are wrong of the Stock American Gixxer with the 160 or so RWHP?
 

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My Gixxer isn't crippled like the American BMWs are.

Since you've never even ridden the Gixxer that I own back to back with American BMW like I have, why don't you post proof that OEM vs OEM, the Gixxer is down on power to the American BMW. Cuz thats not my experience in the real world.
The gsxr is down on power to the bmw; its been known and shown on many dynos, but if you want to continue to argue based on your personal feelings we are all therapists here. However with a full pipe and tune that gsxr can make 200 whp, i think i'd own the gsxr 1000 next in line to the s1000rr, they are great bikes. Another Moore video(who is probably more biased to Suzuki) again shows a broken in gsxr 1000 with brocks full pipe and dyno tune made 182whp and the brand new s1000rr with no tune and a header made 185whp.

 

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Source:


When BMW revealed its list of updated color options and minor upgrades for carryover 2023 models, the S 1000 RR superbike was notably missing from the list, indicating that it’s getting bigger changes in the coming year. Now we’ve got our hands on the upgraded bike’s specifications, which reveal subtle but significant revisions.

The 2023 S 1000 RR was recently type-approved in Europe and gets a bunch of improvements. These largely take cues from the more expensive M 1000 RR homologation special, and will give a taste of that bike to the masses at a more affordable price.

The first noteworthy upgrade is to the engine and power output. The 2022 S 1000 RR makes a claimed 204 hp in European trim, hitting that mark at 13,500 rpm, while the M 1000 RR is good for 209 hp at 14,500 rpm. The US models are slightly different, with both the S and M bikes managing 202.5 hp at 13,000 rpm. Documentation shows that the 2023 S 1000 RR, in Europe at least, will split the power difference between the current S 1000 RR and M 1000 RR with a claimed 206.5 hp at 13,750 rpm. The essence of the ShiftCam four-cylinder engine, with its unique variable valve timing and lift system, is believed to be unchanged; improvements are expected to come from minor internal and electronic tweaks rather than a wholesale redesign.

Whether the US-spec bikes get the same small power increase is yet to be seen. Even without it, the 2023 S 1000 RR will feel quicker than the current bike because it is set to inherit the same lower final-drive ratio used on the M 1000 RR. By using a 46-tooth rear sprocket instead of the standard S 1000 RR’s 45-tooth version, the M bike’s gearing is reduced to boost its acceleration. We know the same also applies to the 2023 S 1000 RR, as its listed top speed in European form is reduced from 190 mph to 188 mph despite its additional power. Additionally, its wheelbase increases from 56.7 inches to 57.4 inches, the same as the M 1000 RR. On the M 1000 RR, the larger sprocket is accompanied by a longer chain, allowing the rear wheel to be moved farther back in its adjusters to increase the wheelbase; the 2023 S 1000 RR is clearly following suit.

There’s no change in the 2023 S 1000 RR’s weight, which remains at 434 pounds including a full tank of fuel, so in that respect the carbon-clad, 423-pound M version will retain an edge. However, the 2023 S 1000 RR will incorporate aerodynamic lessons learned from the M version, gaining winglets on the nose in keeping with the current superbike trends. On the M 1000 RR, the wings add a claimed 35.9 pounds of downforce at 189 mph. The 2023 S 1000 RR’s wings are likely to be a bit smaller, and plastic rather than carbon fiber, reducing the overall level of downforce. They’ll still have a genuine impact on the bike’s stability.

Visually, the addition of the winglets is likely to be the biggest differentiator between the 2022 and 2023 S 1000 RRs. Some sources say that the new bike also has a subtle reworking of the body panels, particularly around the nose. The overall length, width, and height are unchanged, suggesting body changes will only be minimal, but the updates along with fresh paint schemes should be enough to make sure you don’t mistake the new model for the old one. BMW is sure to unveil the bike within the next month or two, though it’s expected to be early 2023 before revised S 1000 RRs start to reach dealers.
 

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The article from Bennetts seems to be the most accurate available.

From a marketing perspective I’m still curious how they will position the M next to the S, if the S will have so many of the M features for a far cheaper price… maybe some are optional instead of standard (wings for example).

Unless BMW also updates the components of the M (suspension and brakes), but that is very unlikely as it would impact their margins or make the bike too expensive.
 

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L'articolo di Bennetts sembra essere il più accurato disponibile.

Dal punto di vista del marketing sono ancora curioso di sapere come posizioneranno la M accanto alla S, se la S avrà così tante caratteristiche della M a un prezzo molto più basso... forse alcune sono opzionali anziché standard (le ali per esempio).

A meno che la BMW non aggiorni anche i componenti della M (sospensioni e freni), ma ciò è molto improbabile in quanto inciderebbe sui loro margini o renderebbe la moto
 

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The engine the m1000rr, is very differently, have interior component and material valuable, another difference is fairing with carbon, brake, fork and mono very efficient ecce ecc

they are for the increase in rpm and the new ratios. in practice it gives an idea at 19/22 how to improve.

however in 2024 the new m1000rr will be released and there will be the real evolutionary step
 

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Yes but Shift cam is the biggest issue with all series, its dead weight and reciprocating mass the race teams don't need. It screws the mapping up at change over. Its not about the flat out power its how it upsets the bike mid corner.

Sent from my SM-S9060 using Tapatalk
 

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Yes but Shift cam is the biggest issue with all series, its dead weight and reciprocating mass the race teams don't need. It screws the mapping up at change over. Its not about the flat out power its how it upsets the bike mid corner.

Sent from my SM-S9060 using Tapatalk
Switch to what VVT?
Camless engines are still a distant reality… we might go electric before that’s implemented 😄

What are you using for the mapping? Motec?
 

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Anyone hear of any new rumors for the 1000 23 model? Waiting to see what is new before I Decide what to get. Also waiting to see if Yamaha comes out with new R1 for the street. I narrowed my choice down to those two and possibly a MV Agusta F4RC. Updates for the BMW should be next month correct.
 
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