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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Update 12/13/22: Just five days after buying my new 2022 S1000RR, on only my second day out riding it, I was hit on the interstate and suffered my first ever motorcycle crash. I came out better than the bike, which was declared a total loss by insurance. After weighing my options, I decided to keep the bike. In this thread I'll document the build, as well as the process for getting a salvage title converted to a rebuilt title in Colorado.

Original Post:

Just brought it home today to replace a well-loved CBR650R.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum. Enjoy it in good health.
Thanks, I'm looking forward to doing just that. My CBR650R was a great do-it-all sport bike for commuting, light touring, and track days. I really loved that bike. Unfortunately, it is relatively heavy and the budget brakes/suspension and shallow ground clearance really limit its capability for hard track use, and it has limited aftermarket support. But I had a great time on it commuting to work year-round, touring the Colorado backcountry, taking it camping, getting caught in snow and hail more than once, and constantly grinding away the feelers at track days.
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I had been thinking of a replacement for a while. I wanted something lighter, with better brakes and suspension, and good aftermarket support. I didn't really want more power, but I did want it to be reliable. The Aprilia RS660 seemed a perfect upgrade, with about the same power but improved performance in all the aforementioned areas the CBR650R was weak. Every single RS660 owner I spoke with at the track talked about its reliability being an issue for a daily commuter, as they all reported different problems with the bike during their ownership. I also considered a Street Triple RS, but am not ready to go back to a naked bike, and the Moto2 isn't very comfortable for commuting.

Riding the S1000RR at CASS, I was surprised by the general comfort of the bike. It fits my body very well, and I had been thinking of it ever since the school. My local dealership had one in stock and let me take it for a spin around the downtown area, stuck in stop-and-go traffic, and get a good feel for how it performs as a daily rider. It has to be the most comfortable superbike on the market, at east for my build and size. Plus, I like the look of the 2022 more than the updated 2023 coming out, so I made an offer and it worked out. I have all winter to get used to it as a commuter, but I'm looking forward to spring when I can get back out on the track. Me at CASS:
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome bike! I really wish I would have optioned the forged wheels in retrospect. Did you pick it up brand new? If so, was this one that was affected by the clutch cover stop sale?
Thank you! I also prefer forged to the carbon fiber, if only because I daily the bike and suspect the forged rims will hold up better over potholed roadways. I did buy it new, and they told me the VIN had no open recalls. I have my 600 mile service scheduled a week from tomorrow, and will be sure to verify.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Well... that sucked.

Five days after buying the S1000RR, I was out on just my second day riding my new bike, enjoying a fairly nice Sunday afternoon. My goal was to get the first 600 miles knocked out while the weather was nice. I had already made an appointment for the following Thursday to have the first service done and 'un-nerf' the bike. I had put 300 miles on the day before, and was now on my way home from putting another 150 miles on the bike down near the Wet Mountains of southern Colorado. I was riding in the middle lane of the interstate, just keeping with traffic, and feeling pretty great about a lovely ride in the country and a rare Broncos win earlier in the day. But then another motorcycle getting onto the interstate cut across two lanes of slower merging traffic and into the middle lane I was occupying, without looking. I saw him come over towards me between two cars in the right lanes just in time for me to move to the left position within my lane and get on the brakes, but I couldn't get out of my lane because a white WRX was occupying the far left lane next to me. The other motorcyclist came over from the right so fast they ended up using all of my lane as they came over, and as I was on the brakes, he hit my front tire with his rear wheel, which sent my new bike down hard on the right side and me tumbling down the interstate in traffic at about 60mph. The motorcyclist that hit me looked back at me over their left shoulder at the moment of impact, just in time to see me go down. Then they took off.

I am a big believer in ATGATT (All The Gear All The Time). And it finally paid off. The Alpinestars Tech 5 airbag deployed a fraction of a second before I impacted the concrete. Once it deployed, I rolled rather comfortably down the interstate about 7 or 8 times before coming to a rest on my stomach. It was like being cradled in a ball of bubble wrap. I instantly jumped up with my hands outstretched to stop traffic so I didn't get run over. The blue Subaru Forester that was cruising behind me a moment earlier had come to a stop about 10 feet away from me. My bike was another 80ft further down the interstate, still in the middle lane. I ran down, picked up my bike, and got it over to the median shoulder while some nice folks called 911.

Looking myself over, my right knee was a bit bruised and my right shoulder hurt, but nothing else. Nothing broken. I never lost consciousness. Not a mark on my hands or arms or anywhere on my legs. But my Kevlar lined riding jeans and my Rev'It! jacket were shredded. And while my A-Stars gauntlet gloves were pretty worn down, they were not worn out. All my gear took it like a champ.

As I was assessing all the damage done to me and my new bike, the ambulance showed up. About that same time the lady in the blue Subaru who kindly didn't run me over, came up and gave me her contact info as a witness to the whole thing. So did another nice lady who had called the ambulance and pulled off onto the shoulder to talk with me and make sure I was alright. After seeing the crash and watching me roll down the interstate at speed, they expected me to be a lot worse off. The lady in the blue Subie said I scared the crap out of her when I finally stopped rolling and then jumped up in front of her car with my hands out. I told her I have wolverine blood and drink badger milk. In reality, it was the riding gear.

The ambulance transported me to the ER, and after a quick x-ray, the doctor confirmed a posterior dislocation of my right shoulder, set it back in the socket, and then sent me home. He and the rest of the staff were positively floored that I had no trauma injuries. No internal injuries, not even scrapes on my hands. ATGATT. I was in the ER less than 2 hours altogether.

Since then, I have been going over things with the insurance. The dealer provided an estimate of just over $18k to repair the bike. That being said, the bike starts and runs great, shifts fine, and is functionally in good shape. I've actually put another 100 miles on it riding it back and forth to the dealer a couple of times since the crash. Had to get that clutch cover bolt recall handled, you know. The majority of the cost comes from some cosmetic damage on the lower crankcase and frame (circled in the pic), a damaged right signal/mirror, and a slightly cracked throttle tube assembly. The rest of the cost is for labor and all the small odds and ends consumed when replacing those things, especially all the parts involved in replacing the lower crankcase. Well, Progressive decided to total the bike, but after a little bit of negotiation with the adjuster and providing local comps of other bikes, they ended up offering me more than I paid for the bike. Now, I could just walk away with some extra cash in hand, but I decided to keep the bike. Progressive paid me $12,600 to keep the salvage bike, which means I own this busted but mostly functional 2022 S1000RR for just under $9k out of pocket. That seems a good deal to me.

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Let the build begin. And then I really need to get it back down to the dealer for that first service to remove the rev limiter.
 

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I can relate to your crash. I had my 21 Ram for 10 days and some idiot on his cell phone ran a red light and smashed it. Hurt my wife (passenger seat) and totaled the truck.
I agree with you, ATGATT! Have never done it any other way. Glad you’re ok!
 

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Holy crap! I have a Tech 5 vest too but never had to deploy it for any reason. Really good to know it did it's job and saved you.
About the salvage aspect...won't the title reflect "salvage" and wouldn't that make it harder to sell later on? That's what happens here in CA anyway and it will scare away potential buyers.
If they total the bike you start fresh with a new one and no title issues.
I get the part about just being out $9K for a 2022 S1000RR, that's fantastic. Just thinking down the road when it's time to sell.

Not trying to rain on your parade, you proved once again to those dudes riding in jeans and hoodies that proper gear saves your ass.

Good for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Holy crap! I have a Tech 5 vest too but never had to deploy it for any reason. Really good to know it did it's job and saved you.
About the salvage aspect...won't the title reflect "salvage" and wouldn't that make it harder to sell later on? That's what happens here in CA anyway and it will scare away potential buyers.
If they total the bike you start fresh with a new one and no title issues.
I get the part about just being out $9K for a 2022 S1000RR, that's fantastic. Just thinking down the road when it's time to sell.

Not trying to rain on your parade, you proved once again to those dudes riding in jeans and hoodies that proper gear saves your ass.

Good for you.
No worries, you have good questions and concerns, not raining on me at all. And you are correct.

In Colorado, a 'Salvage' title will decrease the value, it also means I can't register the motorcycle for the street, and my insurance will no longer accept it for coverage. For this reason, a lot of track bikes have salvage titles. My plan is to fix my bike and then make an appointment with the Colorado State Patrol to have a vehicle inspection performed and certify the bike is safe and road-worthy. Once this is done, the 'Salvage' title can be updated to a 'Rebuilt' title, and then it's legal for street registration. Progressive even allows full coverage to be issued on rebuilt title vehicles. I will document the title process as I go through it, hopefully early next year.

As to the issue of reduced value, a vehicle with a rebuilt title is likely to sell for less, but perhaps not 50% less. I think once this bike is fixed, I could still easily turn around and sell it for more than $10k if I wanted. Someone's already offered me that much for the bike in it's currently damaged state, just to build it as a track bike. That being said, I'm just not that concerned about resale value. I don't buy a motorcycle expecting to get any money back on them, because there's always the possibility I'll wad it up at the track. I have always bought them outright knowing it's possibly expendable. The fact I have never crashed a bike before this one and have always been able to sell them or trade them in later on has been nice, but not something I plan on. And in this sense, if I do end up totalling this S1000RR at the track... well, it's less painful to walk away from a $9k crashed bike than a $21k crashed bike.

And the Tech Air 5 worked very well. I highly recommend it to people all the time, and would never ride without it. I still can't believe how well I came out of the crash. Just an FYI in case you unfrotunately do ever have to use it- it cost $180 to have A-Stars repair it, plus about $20 in shipping. Total turn-around time was just over two weeks, and now it's good as new. And smells better too. Not being able to wash the vest is my only gripe with it. The thing was pretty rank by the time I crashed in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The first step to fixing the bike was to deal with the big issues of the lower engine casing and the frame. The lower engine casing was very easy to fix, as the damage was minor. I pulled the inspection plug and taped off the opening to prevent aluminum from getting into the engine, and then went to work hand sanding and blending the damage. I used a small hand file, 60 grit sandpaper, and finished with 100 grit. The last step was to replace the one bolt whose head was slightly gouged, and torque the new one to spec. It turned out very well and it's difficult to tell there was any damage at all:
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The frame damage was a bit more severe:
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I had to use a cold chisel to free the engine mounting bolt from the aluminum slag, and once it was free I basically did the same thing as the lower engine case and worked the aluminum by hand with a small file and some sandpaper. The engine mounting bolt was actually in good shape once I got all the aluminum slag off of it, but it will be replaced anyways by a new frame slider bolt. The frame after some TLC:
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Now she's ready for some new Woodcraft frame sliders.
 
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