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What's the cheapest and fastest way too get my bike quicker until i do computer over winter any tricks I should know, dont want to put it down for work until it's cold outside. Btw its a 2012


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Lose weight, 520 kit.
 

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Sprockets won't make your bike any quicker, I wouldn't waste your money. Unless you ride in a place where your bike doesn't have traction/wheelie issues. The only place I've found is north of 11,000ft.
 

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Sprockets won't make your bike any quicker, I wouldn't waste your money. Unless you ride in a place where your bike doesn't have traction/wheelie issues.
Most of us have noticed our bikes and cars are much faster in first gear than in second gear, a change in gearing. Perhaps yours is the exception. :)

Yes, if you always have severe traction problems at all RPMs and all gears, no change in gearing will make the bike accelerate faster under any circumstance. Otherwise, gearing will make a substantial difference. Which, coincidentally, is why drag racers run more aggressive gearing.
 

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Most of us have noticed our bikes and cars are much faster in first gear than in second gear, a change in gearing. Perhaps yours is the exception. :)

Yes, if you always have severe traction problems at all RPMs and all gears, no change in gearing will make the bike accelerate faster under any circumstance. Otherwise, gearing will make a substantial difference. Which, coincidentally, is why drag racers run more aggressive gearing.
Could that be a result of the exponential increase in drag coupled with the bike's horrific aerodynamics?

If you're back tire spins, or your front lifts, gearing will not improve acceleration by even a fraction of a second.

If you have the ability to put the torque to the ground, gearing helps. The S1000RR does not, at least not until a good 100mph+

My bike, even at 7200ft altitude, doesn't bring the front tire back down until I hit 3rd gear, which is well into the triple digits. At sea level it was pulling the front wheel in 3rd. So below that speed, it is physically impossible to make the bike accelerate any quicker without changing aerodynamics or the bike's physical layout (wheelbase, weight distribution, etc). More power will not do anything, because the bike already has more power than it can handle.

My 335 spun the tires through 1st gear stock. Now it has 220hp more, and guess what? It still spins the tires through 1st gear. The car isn't any faster until the tires stop spinning.

These drag racers, they run slicks, yes? That they heat up? Do you care to take a gamble at what is still the most popular transmission still used on professional drag circuits? I'll give you a hint it's not a ZF 8-speed.

Sprockets will make the bike feel quicker, but actual data points won't change.
 

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Again, if you always have severe traction problems at all RPMs and all gears, no change in gearing will make the bike accelerate faster. Only less throttle will help.

But, there are many, many circumstances where there is plenty of traction; we are not all drag racing from a dead stop on a slippery surface all of the time. Instead, for example, we accelerate out of a corner, etc. There is plenty of traction. Lower gearing will enable the bike to accelerate quicker, everything else being equal.
 

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You're telling me at wide open throttle, leaned over coming out of a corner you have plenty of traction?

You're delusional. Because of the 10 corners at my local track, that DTC light is flashing on all 10. And that's at 5,000ft altitude.

If you have plenty of traction, then your front wheel is coming up, and it's the same as if you didn't have traction. But there's no way, barring aero or weight changes, that you're able to put 199hp down effectively in 1st, or 2nd for that matter.

When I ride up Pike's Peak, the last 3-4000 ft I no longer have traction or wheelie problems in 1st. That's the only place I've found.
 

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Normally much of what Aaron says I disagree with. However, I agree this time. Take the H2 for example. You can't really do anything with it. It's pretty much on the TC all the time. The little tyre on the back can't handle how much power is being transferred to it. So you turn the TC off. Then you just chew a tyre up in 1000kms because it spins constantly. Soft tyres don't make a difference. Will spin what ever is on there. It's a nothingness bike really. Bikes are at a point where the power they are putting out can't be fully utilised due to tyre contact patch and weight. TC just makes them rideable by dumbing it down.

Lower gearing will make you accelerate quicker providing you are actually getting the traction to get the power down. One thing riders find by lowering the gearing is the thing just wheel spins or wheelies in the air. So really, you haven't gained anything. The power is probably more unusable than it was stock. It's a light switch to ride.

Lighter wheels again, make the force needed to turn the wheel a lot less. Still comes back to traction. Will turn faster but then it can spin easier. It's all grip relative.
 

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Good thing the change in gearing is good for gears 3 through 6 as well! Can we hear about your 335 again, please??
And now we find the other misconception of gearing. Once you're past 1st gear, it generally won't help top end acceleration at all. So although you're gearing is taller from 3-6 as well, your acceleration rate won't change. You'll get through the gears quicker, but won't get to speed faster.

Unless the bike is out of the cam range, under 10,000 ish on these, gearing won't make a difference in actual speed gained. Again it'll feel quicker, but the timing equipment will disappoint.

Our local Police Dep is currently switching from Crown Victoria's to new Explorers. Crowns have 4 speeds, the Explorer 8. Up to 40, the Explorer destroys the Crown Victoria. But once the Crown Vic gets moving, acceleration rates are nearly identical all the north from there.
 

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You're delusional.
Zoo and Flyrider already proffer their speculative armchair psychologist diagnoses, unbidden. Now you, too?

When I ride up Pike's Peak, the last 3-4000 ft I no longer have traction or wheelie problems in 1st. That's the only place I've found.
Yet again, if you are traction limited, gearing up or down is irrelevant; you cannot use the power you have. Everyone agrees (I think). So let's leave this aside.

So, is the bile quicker when you have traction in a given gear? I assume everyone agrees, given perfect traction, a bike with one tooth down on the front sprocket will accelerate quicker. Yes?

Now consider how most ride. They are not WOT at peak RPM at every moment, quickly shifting up only upon reaching redline. They are at varying RPM in various gears with varying throttle settings. They are not traction limited a good share of the time.

Accordingly, under most real world conditions for most riders, lower gearing will make the bike faster.

It is these considerations and practical application which also dictate why a racer picks different gear ratios for each track. It is not because he is power limited or unskilled, but rather how he can best use the power available to him. Sometimes higher gears work better, sometimes lower.

Few of us will change a gear set for a ride in the twisties, but for many a sprocket change makes the power the bike possesses much more usable and, consequently, the bike quicker.

It must be an interesting engineering discussion before a new bike is released: How do we gear this thing? One can easily present good arguments for both higher and lower than stock for this bike.

Your argument appears to be the gearing is already too low as the power is unusable; too little traction, too many wheelies. So, have you accordingly switched to a bigger front/smaller rear sprocket to get the power under control? Why not?
 

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Like I said, the bike isn't any quicker, it just feels quicker. And if that's what you like or are looking for, by all means do what makes you happy!

I've actually considered it, I don't like turning +/- 7,000rpm on my long highway cruises. But at this altitude the bike already feels slightly anemic while riding around town off traffic lights. Notice I said feels. More throttle, or more aggressive launches and I could of course go quicker, but like the rest of you it's nice having the easy torque at times.
 

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Zoo and Flyrider already proffer their speculative armchair psychologist diagnoses, unbidden. Now you, too?
Leave me out of this. You indirectly asked for my diagnoses, I provided :wink2:

Back to the subject. The missing link here is beside -1 on front sprocket, making wheel base slightly longer (7mm without affecting turning), keeps bike stable. Avoids issues Aaron mentioned. At first when I put 520 kit, 120 link chain, I disliked wheel base being longer. After talking to some racers the verdict was that a slightly longer wheel base is desirable for both acceleration and braking. The pros outweighs the cons (slower turning). You guys agree?

I track my bike with few friends who are on stock gearing. They're all experienced riders and my bike is noticeably faster with -1 in the front. Straight line speed I'm ahead of my friends by 2-3 bike length up to 3rd gear. I have not tried beyond that because I'm already too far ahead by then. So -1 does make the bike faster if whole RPM range is considered like Elk said.

Plus who does not like a hovering wheelie at 11k RPM even in 4th gear >:) If TC is conservative (just race or sport), wheelies can be greatly reduced. I use race with -3 in user mode and it works for me.
 

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You're telling me at wide open throttle, leaned over coming out of a corner you have plenty of traction?

You're delusional. Because of the 10 corners at my local track, that DTC light is flashing on all 10. And that's at 5,000ft altitude.

If you have plenty of traction, then your front wheel is coming up, and it's the same as if you didn't have traction. But there's no way, barring aero or weight changes, that you're able to put 199hp down effectively in 1st, or 2nd for that matter.

When I ride up Pike's Peak, the last 3-4000 ft I no longer have traction or wheelie problems in 1st. That's the only place I've found.
Alright, I’m gonna have to send an email to all those STK1000, WSBK and especially all those TT riders who are using bikes with more than stock HP/Torque, they are simply wasting their time using those 220bhp engines…

Heck, I might have to have a chat to Ducati as well and let them know that all that torque they’re putting out with their 1299 is just a waste, and that it shouldn’t be sold as a road bike because it is only a wheel-standing, tire-spinning piece of mechanical lunacy…Now that I think about it, I might have to go +5 on my Super Duke front sprocket…

Leaned over, at wide open throttle, yes, there will be a point where you have plenty of traction – in the meaty part of the tire at mid-range revs.

My interpretation of the original question is about speeding up acceleration prior to peak torque and traction control/wheelie control intervention, and most likely at road riding speeds. Will a gearing change do that, of course.
 
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