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Discussion Starter #1
Hello y'all.

I'm looking to purchase this weekend and I'm having a hell of a time trying to pick between a 2016 R1 and a 2015 S1000RR. The biggest draws to the bimmer for me are the heated grips, cruise control and raw power. The big draws for the R1 are the electronics package, repair and dealer support network and known reliability.

So, I haven't gotten to ride either motorcycle for more than a few miles at demo days over the past couple years. I daily commute all year and hit mountains as often as I can. I'm coming from a Yamaha FJ-09 that I put 24k miles on over the past two years. I've been riding for decades and this will be my first step up into the 1000cc class. (Yamaha U7E in the 90's to Ninja 250, KLR650, Street Triple R, now FJ-09)

So given that I daily commute, I really don't care if it's uncomfortable or hot because it's 45 minutes, twice a day in Atlanta traffic. I'm already suffering, a little more isn't going to hurt. I like the superbike ergos better than sitting upright anyhow. So I'm not even considering my commute in the decision.

Which one would feel better in the mountains? Which one feels better leaned over in long sweepers? Tight switchbacks and changes of direction? I'm suspecting the R1 would be the better canyon carver and the S1000RR would be the better ride for the 90 miles to get to the mountains. This is where the joy is for me and the one that's easier to ride in the mountains is the one I want.

What are your thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
@z00 is your man!
Thanks! I'm guessing @z00 has experience on both. I look forward to hearing some opinions!

Also, haven't done any track days, but plan to do some next year. I'm sure either one will easily be more than my skill-set. I'm more concerned with dropping bad habits and building good ones.

I considered a 600... but I only get to have 1 bike at a time and for everyday riding, I love the torque of larger motors.
 

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If the Yamaha doesn't have cruise control, that's a negative. Never thought CC would be important on a literbike, but I ride almost exclusively in the mountain twisties and for those brief periods when you need your right hand off the throttle, it's fantastic to have. Once you have one, you'll want it on every bike...
 

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If the Yamaha doesn't have cruise control, that's a negative. Never thought CC would be important on a literbike, but I ride almost exclusively in the mountain twisties and for those brief periods when you need your right hand off the throttle, it's fantastic to have. Once you have one, you'll want it on every bike...
Yes! It's so often even when cruising at 45 on a side road that I'll upshift to 6th just so I don't get so much engine breaking when I want to shake my wrists out. I'm really leaning to the BMW for everyday riding. Heated grips in the winter months are also something I didn't know I needed in my life until I had a set. I can always get aftermarket, but OEM heated grips always seem to work so much better.
 

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I would ride both if at all possible. For me the R1 is geared more for the track, its egos prove that. Also the R1 does not have the midrange power I desire on the street, nor does it have heated grips and cruise control. These things were all factors for me riding on the street.
Only you can make the decision on whats important and whats not.
 

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Speaking of ergos, I'm 5'10" and with Heli bars on my '17 RR, I can canyon-carve with ease (more leverage) and also ride 300 miles in the mountains without fatigue (cruise control really helps on straight stretches...), and I'm 72 years of age. So...the RR for "the win", I think. Does it all and does it well.
 

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Many will say the BMW heated grips are pretty feeble and most aftermarket are far superior. I agree. Big difference in reliability ratings but an extended warranty can help. Personally, I would not but a BMW w/o one and likely not for the R1.
 

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Why are you limited to 16 R1 and 15 RR?

What's your budget? If you can swing it to get the new RR even a base, it would be better than two bikes you picked.

I hope you shop around, there are some great deals on 18 bikes. New and used, also CSS (calif super bike school) has some low mileage 18 RR that they sell for good prices. Give them a call and ask for JJ their mechanic.

But to answer your question, 16 R1 would handle and work better for the twisties & track. 15 RR for commuting.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
How tall are you? most tall people seem to like and enjoy the ergos of the RR
I'm 5'10" with a 32" inseam. So I'm pretty much the guy motorcycles are designed around, lol.

The point about the street riding comfort and roominess above is attractive.

Honestly, this is odd, but the activity and engagement level of the forum here is also convincing me on the BMW.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Why are you limited to 16 R1 and 15 RR?

What's your budget? If you can swing it to get the new RR even a base, it would be better than two bikes you picked.

I hope you shop around, there are some great deals on 18 bikes. New and used, also CSS (calif super bike school) has some low mileage 18 RR that they sell for good prices. Give them a call and ask for JJ their mechanic.

But to answer your question, 16 R1 would handle and work better for the twisties & track. 15 RR for commuting.

My shopping budget is around 11k and both of these are available at about this price point and taking into considering the trade on my FJ-09. Most of the 15+ r1's and the 15+ S1000RRs are in the 13-15k range around Georgia/Southeast area. I've toyed with shipping, but I really need to inspect it myself. I used to do auto repair professionally, and have done all maintenance on my motorcycles so I'm not really shy about fixing things. I just can't/won't touch suspension internals.
 

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I would not own either bike without a warranty.

A new 18 R1 or RR can be had for around $13500. So I suggest to up your budget, get a bike with warranty (factory one not via a 3rd party). It's the end of the season, many 18 bikes around to look at. You're in Atlanta, you have many dealerships around.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would not own either bike without a warranty.

A new 18 R1 or RR can be had for around $13500. So I suggest to up your budget, get a bike with warranty (factory one not via a 3rd party). It's the end of the season, many 18 bikes around to look at. You're in Atlanta, you have many dealerships around.
There's only one dealership with any '18 BMW leftovers and it's one of the models with forged wheels, etc. A little over 16k + 800 in taxes is that best he said they could do and that retail is at 19k. I looked at everything I could find within about 400 miles which is what pushed me to used. R1 is in a similar boat and I'd have to go to N. Carolina (called the dealer) that advertised an '18 R1 at 14k, but they said they wouldn't budge on doc fee, freight, assembly, etc.

The S1000RR and R1 don't see a lot of leftover models in the Atlanta area. Unlike the CBR1000RR which still have 2017 models for new available. I'd consider a GSXR, but I prefer the electronics packages on the other two. There are some R1S models, but I've ruled that model out.

I'm avoiding electronic suspension, and the only common problem I've read about the 2015 was veering right, which turned out to be clutch cable routing for a lot of people. Are there any other common issues with the 2015 S1000RR that you would say are good reasons to avoid it? The one I'm looking at used only has 1200 miles on it.
 

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Save a little more and get the newer models. At least 2016+. That 2018/19 s1krr for $19k you mentioned is too expensive for a left over. Now that the 2020 are out, those should be around 15.5-17k.

I also love cruise control. Its life changing lol. I cant wait to try heated grips in the next couple months.
 

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I'm avoiding electronic suspension, and the only common problem I've read about the 2015 was veering right, which turned out to be clutch cable routing for a lot of people. Are there any other common issues with the 2015 S1000RR that you would say are good reasons to avoid it? The one I'm looking at used only has 1200 miles on it.
I had a '15 and fixed the "veering" issue with a much lighter Akra slip-on. It wasn't the clutch cable...just a weight distribution issue, which BMW addressed on the newest iteration by shifting the engine very slightly leftward. No other issues on the bike.

Why avoid electronic suspension? It's light years better than the analog suspension on the '13 RR I owned.
 

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I owned a '15 R1 and a '15 S1000RR at the same time. I was a victim of R1's do not ride transmission recall. That year was also the year BMW had a problem with forged rims on the Premium edition and put cast on many of them. The BMW has always been perfectly reliable for me.

Riding position style the two are very different. The R1 you're on "top" of it, and the S1000RR you're "in" it. The tank shape is primarily what causes this feeling. Personally I'm faster and more comfortable on the S1000RR (12,15). The previous gen R1s were all "in" it style bikes and I loved those (01,02, 04, 09).

Someone complained about torque on the R1 and no idea why...I had full system, FTECU flashed with autoblipper and the bike was a monster out of corners. That said, its throttle was a light switch, whereas the BMW I felt as though it was connected to my brain directly and super smooth. These are style preferences, some prefer that light switch type.

Cruise control is that awesome, same with heated grips.
The R1 is without a doubt lighter and turned in a bit easier, but the S1000RR is not a hog and carves corners smoothly just a bit more input needed.
R1 gets the nod in exhaust sound if that is worth anything to you.
Hopefully this is of some help and feel free to ask me anything. Ultimately there isn't a wrong choice between the two, hence my garage for a few years with both :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I had a '15 and fixed the "veering" issue with a much lighter Akra slip-on. It wasn't the clutch cable...just a weight distribution issue, which BMW addressed on the newest iteration by shifting the engine very slightly leftward. No other issues on the bike.

Why avoid electronic suspension? It's light years better than the analog suspension on the '13 RR I owned.

Bottom line, I'm being cheap and my budget refuses to finance =p I've been waiting for a couple of years for liter-bike prices with acceptable electronics packages to come down in price while saving. I was looking at 2015+ R1/S1000RR, 2017+CBR1000RR & GSX-R1000. I'm not a fan of the ZX-10 though, it just feels awkward to me. The others all felt good on very short/limited demo day test rides. I say acceptable electronics packages and what I mean is ABS for the daily all-weather commute. I could get a CBR for less, and while it has a nice light feel to it, it just doesn't bring the whole package the R1 or S1000RR have.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I owned a '15 R1 and a '15 S1000RR at the same time. I was a victim of R1's do not ride transmission recall. That year was also the year BMW had a problem with forged rims on the Premium edition and put cast on many of them. The BMW has always been perfectly reliable for me.

Riding position style the two are very different. The R1 you're on "top" of it, and the S1000RR you're "in" it. The tank shape is primarily what causes this feeling. Personally I'm faster and more comfortable on the S1000RR (12,15). The previous gen R1s were all "in" it style bikes and I loved those (01,02, 04, 09).

Someone complained about torque on the R1 and no idea why...I had full system, FTECU flashed with autoblipper and the bike was a monster out of corners. That said, its throttle was a light switch, whereas the BMW I felt as though it was connected to my brain directly and super smooth. These are style preferences, some prefer that light switch type.

Cruise control is that awesome, same with heated grips.
The R1 is without a doubt lighter and turned in a bit easier, but the S1000RR is not a hog and carves corners smoothly just a bit more input needed.
R1 gets the nod in exhaust sound if that is worth anything to you.
Hopefully this is of some help and feel free to ask me anything. Ultimately there isn't a wrong choice between the two, hence my garage for a few years with both :)
Awesome! Thanks. The model I'm looking at has cast wheels. I'm very familiar with the Yamaha and their twitchy throttles and absolutely loved the throttle smoothness on my old street triple. If the BMW is similar, the progressive light throttle feel would be amazing to me.

I'm convinced that the BMW is probably the better choice for me, given I ride 100 miles just to get to the mountains, daily commute and often ride into other states. The R1 has that track-tool appeal, but even with some track days, I'm sure it'll be a few years before I can hope to push either one to a point where one would matter over the other.

I actually like the I4 sound, despite it being so common. The crossplane is unique and has an awesome sound, but I recently decided on a 1000cc over a 600cc and the only reason I almost went with a 600 is because the scream at 14k or 15k rpm is amazing to me. To my ears, the crossplane and Ducatis have that big block muscle car sound while the other I4 engines have more of that formula 1 sound.

Edit: I think your "in" vs "on" clinched it for me. I like that "in" feel and usually means getting chest to tank is easier and I don't have to work hard to look "up", especially around tight uphill left turns in the mountains.
 

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The best bang for buck would be the Gsxr and I would not overlook that bike as great deals can be had. Its a hell of a bike as most of these are. If you like the looks of it I would seriously check them out! I would not get hung up on all this electronic stuff but if cruise and heated grips are on your mind it doesnt have them. And to the one that said the BMW heated grips are feeble, mine work perfect, hot and hotter!
To be honest I could of bought anyone of these bikes, R1, Bmw, suzuki, Honda etc.
For me it came down to the Honda BMW and Gsxr. The BMW won me over with its power, style and features. I could live without all this electronics stuff on these bikes these days though
 
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