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Anyone on here switch out any of their oem parts for ProTi pieces?

I’ve switched out a few of my fairing bolts for the Blue Ti and I think they add a nice contrast compared to the OEM stuff.

Anyone do the same and specifically change the rear sprocket nuts?

My understanding is that the OEM torque value for the nuts (M Carbon Wheels) is 100nM - since they are a mechanically locking bolts like the rear axle nut.

I’ve heard that a normal sprocket nut in this instance should be around 40nM but I can’t find any recommendations anywhere.

Anyone out there happen to change theirs out to a Ti alternative?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I have a rear titanium axle nut, titanium pinch bolts in front, Ti hardware on calipers and lots of other places. The Ti bolts are stronger often times than the factory materials, and can easily be overtorqued by mistake. So I suggest staying with factory torque settings, because whatever the Ti bolts or nuts are attaching to, remain as softer materials.
 

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"The material between your stock bolt and PROTI is huge different in its strength and weight; therefore we suggest torqueing them with the 85% volume of your bike’s instruction requests, especially to the larger dimension such as M10, M12 in caliper.For example: If the caliper bolt from manufacturer is 45Nm, then the proper torque 85% of it is 38Nm.
In smaller dimension of bolt such as M3 to M8, we suggest following your bike’s instruction while torqueing, please be noted do not excess its max torque volume."
 

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@DrIoannis is definitely a level of proficiency above me: listen to him!

Thank you for the correction.
 

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I would DEFINITELY use the Ti manufacturer's values, and in fact would be VERY cautious in using Ti for any structural fasteners (brake caliper bolts, axle or axle nut, etc.). In other words, I personally won't use them for anything but maybe fairing fasteners. Ti isn't as strong or stiff as steel, so the clamping force will be less. VERY important on things like brake caliper bolts and axles etc.. Engineers very carefully calculate the clamping force needed to clamp the parts together. If there's not enough clamping force, the 2 parts can move relative to each other under stress, leading to fatigue failure of the fasteners (not what you want on brake caliper bolts). From the chart, Ti isn't much stiffer than aluminum.
Young's Modulus of Elasticity for Metals and Alloys (engineeringtoolbox.com)
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"The material between your stock bolt and PROTI is huge different in its strength and weight; therefore we suggest torqueing them with the 85% volume of your bike’s instruction requests, especially to the larger dimension such as M10, M12 in caliper.For example: If the caliper bolt from manufacturer is 45Nm, then the proper torque 85% of it is 38Nm.
In smaller dimension of bolt such as M3 to M8, we suggest following your bike’s instruction while torqueing, please be noted do not excess its max torque volume."
This is what I do with mine (85% on the large fasteners, and BMW torque spec on smaller) and so far just fine.
 

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This is what I do with mine (85% on the large fasteners, and BMW torque spec on smaller) and so far just fine.
That's an OK rule of thumb for non-structural fasteners. To me, that whole Ti fastener thing is kinda pointless. How many times are people going to forget to use that 85% and instead just go by the manual instructions and over torque the fastener? All for, how many GRAMS of weight savings? I get that people want the bling factor, just not for me.
 
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I got them because at the time I was having trouble finding fasteners that were pre-drilled for safety wire. Ti is what I found so thought I'd try it. I have a list of torque specs for the fasteners I remove regularly and have an ingrained habit of checking before I torque.

But it would be easy to screw up. I had a lot of trouble finding any consistent (never mind reliable) information about what torque to use for Ti - especially in applications with anti-seize or other lubricant.

Also, they reduced my average lap time by 1.8 seconds.
 

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I got them because at the time I was having trouble finding fasteners that were pre-drilled for safety wire. Ti is what I found so thought I'd try it. I have a list of torque specs for the fasteners I remove regularly and have an ingrained habit of checking before I torque.

But it would be easy to screw up. I had a lot of trouble finding any consistent (never mind reliable) information about what torque to use for Ti - especially in applications with anti-seize or other lubricant.

Also, they reduced my average lap time by 1.8 seconds.
I've seen drill jigs with drill bushings in them that fit the heads of common sized fasteners, it might be worth finding some of them that are quality. Drill bushings work on drill bits because, unlike milling cutters, drills are not "side-cutting" tools, they are only "end-cutting" tools.

Yeah, gotta be careful about using lubricant, you can easily strip threads using lube because by the time you reach torque value, you've already stripped it. I remember bolts for rod big-ends being mic'd before and after tightening, to get a true measurement of clamping force, the only real way to do that actually. With torque you're guessing on how much friction you get vs clamping force. Plus, what alloy Ti are they? That would matter, like the difference between Grade 5 and Grade 8 bolts, and the parent metal they go into. I think this is why I'd never use them except for fairing fasteners.
 
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How many times are people going to forget to use that 85% and instead just go by the manual instructions and over torque the fastener?
And what happens if you sell the bike, do you take them all off? You'd have to wouldn't you. I wouldn't have any issues using them myself, hell they make valves out of Ti, it's strong enough. But like steels, there are many grades of titanium so I wouldn't be buying any off Ebay from Shenzhen.
 

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And what happens if you sell the bike, do you take them all off? You'd have to wouldn't you. I wouldn't have any issues using them myself, hell they make valves out of Ti, it's strong enough. But like steels, there are many grades of titanium so I wouldn't be buying any off Ebay from Shenzhen.
Like many materials, Ti is great for some things, not so good for others. I had a lot of wrong suppositions about Ti that I'd had for many years, until I worked with NASA Engineers who knew it's properties far better than I did. I learned a TON from them. for instance, I was under the incorrect impression that in addition to being somewhat stronger and stiffer than aluminum, and takes heat better, that it was also lighter. Wrong, it's heavier. It's also difficult to machine and bend. Also, like (but not nearly as bad as) C/F and other plastics, it has some notch sensitivity, limiting it's uses and opening the door to possible fatigue and other failures. Steel is definitely stronger AND stiffer than Ti, but heavier. We had some designs where we wanted to use aluminum, but then had to change to Ti or even stainless steel. Sometimes we wanted to use C/F, but after analysis, ended up using Ti. Steel is actually a great all-around material. Cheap, capable of incredible strength and stiffness, usually very easily machined and welded, and it's properties are well-known and understood. Unfortunately, it rusts, so, you use stainless, which has some undesirable properties (sometimes tough to machine and weld).

I'd sell the bike as is, tell the guy about the Ti fasteners, and caveat emptor.
 
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