BMW S1000RR Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
252 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After a lot of trial and error and much frustration sitting at lights trying to find neutral, going back-and-forth from 1st to 2nd, I came upon the following solution.

If I anticipate the stop when I see a red light, I find neutral while I’m still rolling slowly and it seems to go in every time with no problem. It’s so great to see that N without all the frustration.

It’s still a pain in the neck if I’m at a dead stop, but what I do is put it in first gear and roll up just a hair and most of the time it drops in.

Hope that’s a fix for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
That's pretty much the ticket for every bike I've ever ridden, going back almost 40 years. I REALLY wish they'd standardize that neutral is BELOW 1st, not between 1st and second. That would eliminate this whole issue, AND, more importantly, make it almost impossible to miss the 1-2 shift, which is by far the most common missed shift, especially if you're leaving the light in a hurry.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,058 Posts
Just a question of cost. It would be another set of shift forks and other complications to put neutral at the end. When you consider that the shaft connected to the sprocket is stationary when at rest, it makes sense that rolling it forward or back even a small distance is enough to get the gears to engage (or in this case disengage).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Just a question of cost. It would be another set of shift forks and other complications to put neutral at the end. When you consider that the shaft connected to the sprocket is stationary when at rest, it makes sense that rolling it forward or back even a small distance is enough to get the gears to engage (or in this case disengage).
Parts would need to be designed for the change, for sure, but mechanically that's an easy change. But I think it would be well worth it. I think all this was discussed in a previous thread, but you could easily put a lockout in there so it couldn't find neutral over, say, 2mph (or whatever) much easier than doing it if neutral was in between 1st and 2nd while still allowing the 1-2 shift. Imagine just needing to downshift all the way to the bottom coming to a light KNOWING you won't find 1st instead of neutral. Just push down until it stops. Better yet, in coming into a tight hairpin like we have in CO where there is a drastic/steep elevation change from entrance to exit, it would be awesome knowing that you will never accidently catch neutral if you're hustling into the corner, completely FUBAR-ing your line. Don't ask how I know... LOL Honestly, I'm surprised some manufacturer hasn't taken the initiative and done this, like, years ago. I WOULD. To my knowledge there is no regulation forcing a certain shift pattern. I think it's just...industry momentum from back in the days when some Britbikes had shifters on the right and patterns were all over the place. The fear of change, that some riders would make a mistake. I'd argue that people who go to a GP shift pattern have a far bigger risk of something bad happening if they make a shifting mistake than having neutral at the bottom with a lockout. Especially if they let a friend ride who forgets the bike has the GP pattern. Me, I've never wanted to go to a GP shift, even if I was racing. I don't want to have to remember when jumping from my KX or KTM to my BMW which pattern I'm on. I want it instinctive, which simply moving the neutral would more easily become because the motion for upshifts and downshifts would be the same. Kevin Schwantz and a few other notables were certainly successful with a standard shift pattern.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
8,184 Posts
In traffic/lightstops, should not be in N anyway so it's fast to launch as needed.
Putting bike in N is risky while it's rolling into a stop for many reasons. In traffic I keep it in 1st, hold clutch.

You will find N easier if you turn off the bike first so engine is not spinning, even when parked it's safer to keep bike in gear. If N is needed at stops for whatever reason, from 2nd to N is usually easier from 1st to N. It also depends whether std or GP shift is used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
In traffic/lightstops, should not be in N anyway so it's fast to launch as needed.
Putting bike in N is risky while it's rolling into a stop for many reasons. In traffic I keep it in 1st, hold clutch.

You will find N easier if you turn off the bike first so engine is not spinning, even when parked it's safer to keep bike in gear. If N is needed at stops for whatever reason, from 2nd to N is usually easier from 1st to N. It also depends whether std or GP shift is used.
There is some truth to that from a safety standpoint, I've actually BEEN plowed into from behind twice on my bike at a light. Once with major bike damage and injury, the last time on the 'RR with no bike damage but minor back injury. BUT, you should be scanning your mirrors at all times anyway approaching and at a light, and if you're watching, the split second you lose in downshifting into first isn't critical. I'll save wear and tear on my clutch plates (and forearm) and leave it in neutral as soon as the car behind me has safely come to a stop.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top