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What I've learned from another of Ryan F9's excellent videos, is that SNELL helmets are designed first and foremost for car racing, and are not necessarily the most protective for motorcycle users, despite being required by motorcycle racing organization.


Hopefully we will get a more meaningful standard adopted soon. Until then, I buy helmets that (1) fit me well, and (2) are from a respected manufacturer.
 

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Agree with most of what you are saying. Technically, I also would prefer a full helmet. Originally, ended up getting a modular helmet simply because I could not get my glasses to go in (I can't wear contacts). The legs of my glasses were too flexible and it was like trying to push spaghetti noodles into the helmet. Fortunately, I have not tested the helmet's efficacy. These days helmet manufacturers make the neck area so tight (for noise reduction), I have a hard time trying to get a helmet to slide over my oversized melon. I used to love Shoei helmets, but for the most part I can't get them over my head. The AGV K6 does fit (although I have to smack/push down hard on the top of the helmet for it to slide down my head), but trying to get my glasses on is still a bit of an adventure.
I hear ya bro. I refuse to wear contacts because I can't stand the thought of sticking something in my eyes, and riding dirt I'd simply get all that [email protected] all over the contacts anyways. also, I like that second layer of protection that impact-resistant lenses provide. I'd recently bought a brand new set of nice bifocals with Oakley frames to replace the old glasses I'd had since 2010....only to find out the straight earpieces I got specifically so it'd be easier to put the glasses on the new, tighter X-Fourteen....don't fit. [email protected]! The slide in easier, but they're just a little too long, and they won't go all the way back and so instead of sitting on the bridge of my nose, the nosepiece float in space about 1/2" from my nose. Gah! Think I'm going to try and bend the earpieces more (that style doesn't have available bent earpieces), or get a set of 3M photogrey safety glasses. I've found them at vendors for about $50/pair (ain't buying a case!), think I'll order a pair to try out. My goggles and faceshields tend to fog up, even in summer, so these might be good for riding the KTM especially for low speed work. I can crack my faceshield a little, and still have good eye protection.
3M™ SecureFit™ 600 Series Safety Glasses | 3M United States

Olde Man Problems... 🤣 Something to think about, certainly, for new helmet buyers.
 

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What I've learned from another of Ryan F9's excellent videos, is that SNELL helmets are designed first and foremost for car racing, and are not necessarily the most protective for motorcycle users, despite being required by motorcycle racing organization.

Hopefully we will get a more meaningful standard adopted soon. Until then, I buy helmets that (1) fit me well, and (2) are from a respected manufacturer.
"William "Pete" Snell was a popular amateur sports car race driver. In 1956, during a Sports Car Club of America racing event, he died of massive head injuries when the auto racing helmet he was wearing failed to protect his head."

So, while I agree Snell was started in response to a car racing accident, I completely disagree with FortNine that it's a "car" standard. If you look at the tests and how they are performed, the testing looks biased much more to the types of impacts you'd see on a motorcycle vs a car, even on an open-wheeled car. VERY rarely does anything ever hit a helmet in a closed-cockpit car, even the rollbar. Usually you have a restraint system as in the video. On a bike, you have the roofs of cars, Armco barriers, curbs, poles and trees, etc. Yes, you typically never hit the same spot twice on a bike, but I've also seen a number of crashes in racing where the back of the rider's helmet has hit several times in the same spot as they tumbled. Most car racing helmets are open-faced, generally the only car drivers wearing full-face helmets are the open-wheel guys. Even then, I can't ever see something hitting their chinbar. The top of the eyeport yes, the chinbar, no. So that test especially seems motorcycle-oriented, from the type of impacts with a car I mentioned above.
Snell helmets certification - Testing (smf.org)

The only thing that's interesting, is that the Snell standard for helmets for STREET use may actually be TOO good. For instance, they're made to take a HUGE impact (often several in the same spot per testing) and transmit as little energy to the head as possible. As in a racing accident at high speed. So, what that means, is that in the average lower-energy street impact, they transmit TOO much energy to the head and you'd be better off with a softer helmet with more crush. Of course, it would be NOT as much protection if on the street you DID see that kind of impact, but for the majority of cases/impacts, you'd be better served with the softer helmet. I seem to remember that's the reason HJC cited for NOT getting Snell certification. Makes sense. But for me, I'll take my chances with the Snell cert since I'm on the 'RR, but could forgo it on the Hornet helmet I have for the KTM if that was an option (it wasn't).

I guess the bottom line is that until they make airbags for helmets, there is no "perfect" helmet for all kinds of impacts. All the ones I've ever had have been both DOT and Snell rated. Pick the rating you think best applies to you. You'se pays your money and you'se takes your chances.
 

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"William "Pete" Snell was a popular amateur sports car race driver. In 1956, during a Sports Car Club of America racing event, he died of massive head injuries when the auto racing helmet he was wearing failed to protect his head."

So, while I agree Snell was started in response to a car racing accident, I completely disagree with FortNine that it's a "car" standard. If you look at the tests and how they are performed, the testing looks biased much more to the types of impacts you'd see on a motorcycle vs a car, even on an open-wheeled car. VERY rarely does anything ever hit a helmet in a closed-cockpit car. Most car racing helmets are open-faced, generally the only car drivers wearing full-face helmets are the open-wheel guys. Even then, I can't ever see something hitting their chinbar. The top of the eyeport yes, the chinbar, no. So that test especially seems motorcycle-oriented, from the type of impacts with a car I mentioned above.
Snell helmets certification - Testing (smf.org)

The only thing that's interesting, is that the Snell standard for helmets for STREET use may actually be TOO good. For instance, they're made to take a HUGE impact (often several in the same spot per testing) and transmit as little energy to the head as possible. As in a racing accident at high speed. So, what that means, is that in the average lower-energy street impact, they transmit TOO much energy to the head and you'd be better off with a softer helmet with more crush. Of course, it would be NOT as much protection if on the street you DID see that kind of impact, but for the majority of cases/impacts, you'd be better served with the softer helmet. I seem to remember that's the reason HJC cited for NOT getting Snell certification. Makes sense. But for me, I'll take my chances with the Snell cert since I'm on the 'RR, but could forgo it on the Hornet helmet I have for the KTM if that was an option (it wasn't).
I've read that the ECE certification is a better compromise for the street than Snell but that many track orgs require Snell.
 

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To complicate matters even more, aren't Snell and FIM butting heads? Snell tests favors a harder outer shell, while FIM tests favors softer shells. Thus it is becoming a challenge for manufacturers to develop a helmet which complies with both standards. If memory serves me right, Snell kind of blinked by developing a standard which complies with FIM and another standard for the US market. It might be discussed in the video just posted by stgatev.

Hmmm... nobody has mentioned DOT. I wonder why? :rolleyes:
 

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I've read that the ECE certification is a better compromise for the street than Snell but that many track orgs require Snell.
I'd agree in most cases. It's up to the sanctioning body. You're correct that, in the US at least, they seem to prefer Snell. I see a ton of Shoei and Arai helmets in MotoGP and WSBK, but without seeing the stickers, we have no way of knowing what the ratings are on, say, Bagnaia's actual helmet. You would think they're off the shelf X-Fourteens, maybe just with custom paint, but who really knows?

I agree with you and the other sentiments here that maybe it's time for a new and improved certification, specifically for motorcycle helmets. Years ago I read about a company called 6D that had some very unique tech along those lines, lessening energy transmission for the lower impacts of typical street impacts, while still protecting against the big ones.
6D HOME - 6D Helmets

What I would think would be really cool, is, with the advances in non-newtonian fluids, what if you could create a gel, than was soft for comfort on your head, but in progressively harder impacts, gets more and more solid to protect you? Instead of styrofoam (typically constant-density/constant energy absorption) you could have multiple little bladders of this fluid. This would also mean that as long as you didn't damage the fiberglass (or carbon fiber, etc.) shell when you dropped your helmet, you wouldn't damage the energy-absorption material. Unlike a dropped typical helmet, where the outer shell can deform without damage, but it leaves an unseen crushed area in the styrofoam, compromising it's characteristics in that spot. I think if they could nail this technology for helmets, it'd be a TOTAL game-changer.
Non-Newtonian fluids — Science Learning Hub
 

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Glad you asked:
Hey, how can you even trust someone that says "Zed" instead of "Z"? Oh, and then there's this: "...like this visor latch, it forces me to see the world through crosshairs. Like an American." LOL He's just upset that he's the one SEEN in the crosshairs, but I digress... I actually like his vids, and don't know if was trying to be funny, or trying to be an @sshole. I'm all for new helmet tech and testing though. Like I said, I'd love to see a non-newtonian substance used for infinitely adjustable impact protection that isn't destroyed in the first impact like styrofoam.
Groundbreaking Motorcycle Helmets – Best of 2020 - YouTube
 

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To complicate matters even more, aren't Snell and FIM butting heads? Snell tests favors a harder outer shell, while FIM tests favors softer shells. Thus it is becoming a challenge for manufacturers to develop a helmet which complies with both standards. If memory serves me right, Snell kind of blinked by developing a standard which complies with FIM and another standard for the US market. It might be discussed in the video just posted by stgatev.

Hmmm... nobody has mentioned DOT. I wonder why? :rolleyes:
But you can't buy the Snell-FIM helmets in the US. I asked Arai at the beginning of the season.
 

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I have a Shoei Gt-Air helmet and it's by far the most quiet helmet I've ever owned but it's my first sport touring helmet and any previous helmet I had was on the sportier side (Arai RX-7 Corsair and HJC RHPA 11).
 

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But you can't buy the Snell-FIM helmets in the US. I asked Arai at the beginning of the season.
That's a shame. Always good when you have choices. But, the latest Snell (and FIM?) standards were suppose to take effect in 2020. Snell updates the standard every five years. Yet, the Shoei RF 1400 is the only helmet I know which complies with the latest Snell 2020 standards. I would assume Arai has at least one out, but not aware of which one. For those using the track, is there a requirement that the helmets must meet Snell standards, and if so are they implementing the 2015 or 2020 standards? The Shoei RF1400 says nothing about ece or fim standards.
 

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I’m stuck between a Schuberth full face and a Shoei X14
Never worn a Schuberth, but I know they're quality helmets, if very pricey. Michael Schumacher always wore them. Sadly, he wasn't wearing one on his last skiing trip... :( But, I can vouch for the X-Fourteen, and I wish I'd moved up from the RF series sooner. I'd avoided them because it's a "racing helmet" and I don't race and didn't want to spend the extra $200 or so, but, I'd always had a problem of the RF's sitting a little too low on my head, limiting visibility at the top even though I wasn't in a racing tuck. Well, the advantage of the X-Fourteen is that the eyeport is rotated up 5deg compared to the RF's, and the padding can be moved to move the eyeport up another 5deg. This is a major benefit for me, something I'd never thought about until TJ mentioned it, and I'm so glad he did. TJ at RidersDiscount here can get you a smoking deal on one, not sure if he can do the same on the Schuberth. Give him a ring or PM him.

Best of luck!
 

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X-Lite 803 ultra carbon + earplugs. in fact just any lid + earplugs, theres no such thing as a quiet lid.
 

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I have a few hjc rpha 11 pro and recently purchased the rpha carbon, they are are fairly quickly quiet. Tons quieter than my shoei rf 1400, speeds up to 160ish.
Tire Helmet Wheel Motorcycle Motorcycle helmet
 

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What’s a quiet sport helmet? I know the Schuberth is the quietest but I don’t want modular. Guy at CycleGear said lighter helmets (carbon fiber) are louder. Is that true? I have a Shark Spartan Shesster GT and the buffeting is insane. I ride with foam earplugs and the helmet screams in the wind at 100mph. I used to think it was a windshield issue on my Ducati Multistrada but I don’t think so. Guy at CycleGear tried to sell me a Shoei RF1400.
I have several helmets, X14 is my favorite but the quietest performance helmet I have is the Shark Race R Pro. Comfortable too.
 

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I've had both the Schuberth C4 Delta Pro Carbon and X-14, but for my head the Shoei was way more comfortable than the X-14. Couldn't say which is quieter as I ALWAYS wear earplugs. My recommendation for noise is... earplugs + whatever helmet fits your head the best. Speaking of helmets, I bought my Schuberth from a Dutch website, called championhelmets, and they shipped DHL to the USA in no time, with WAY better pricing than RevZilla or other local outlets. FYI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I think what my problem is, is wind buffeting. I noticed when I add a neck roll like a scarf or WindJammer, the problem noise is virtually gone.

 

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I think what my problem is, is wind buffeting. I noticed when I add a neck roll like a scarf or WindJammer, the problem noise is virtually gone.

This is very interesting. I have experimented, while riding, to place my open palm under the chin bar and block the air from getting into the helmet, and can definitely feel a difference. I was even contemplating fabricating a deflector of windproof material.

So this Windjammer works, yeah?
 
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