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You guys must not buy brand new S1000RR at least since 2019.

There is a form you are required to sign that clearly states in Kilometers that you will break in the bike to 1000KM.. that happens to equal in US 621.371 there about. I have the form from my 2020 I got June of 2019, and I have the form on my M1000RR I got July 2021. You are 100% responsible to make that mileage number and not tamper with the reset. I will see if I can find the form from my M1000RR since I think I still have that paper work all together. If you dont have this form, I can only guess that some dealers dont care about this form and make you sign it.

The cluster has the service miles programmed in it at the factory. That number I have seen in the cluster is typically 624 miles. There is no date limit to the break in, so if you happen to buy the bike and it sits 2 years, it still going to require the distance of 624 miles there about.

As to the break in process of an ENGINE.. it does not matter if you call it a daily driver engine, or a race engine. How many variation do you want to read about or watch a video ... Just google it ..


Break in of an engine has been taught and pass down from master mechanic to student for as long as the engine has existed. Very few will use my process and I have this process based on building 100% race engines where clean clean clean cannot be over used in making sure a $50,000 race motor will live.

I change the break in oil and filter at 500 miles. ( I have my K46 2015 oil filter still on the shelf along with my K67 and K66 oil filters ) .... put in the oil I intend to run and go to the 624 miles mark. I let the dealer change the oil and filter again. Then at 1500 miles I change the oil and filter again. I am finally happy to left the intervals be 2000-3000 miles depending on how many track days are involved.

There is no real set time on changing oil. Look at the old days of drag racing when those guys ran 1/4 mile and changed the oil and filter EVERY run down the 1/4 mile. Alot of reasons for this. Fuel saturation, heat in the oil causes break down even in 1320 feet, check the oil for bearing material or camshaft bearing material to catch a failing bearing after every run.


You do what is right for you. Its your time and your money.

BMW Motorrad says you can buy a BMW S1000RR and ride it 1000KM and they will change the oil and filter at first service. Then they will reset the cluster to 1 year or 6214 miles which happens to be 10,000KM.. I do not agree with 6214 miles what so ever. I would never go beyond 3000 miles under just normal commute riding.. but again, that is just me and my process.
 
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Was just reading JE Piston's guide to break in (admittedly for a new build, whereas I expect we never see an un-started engine). How to Break-In An Engine

"According to JE’s Senior Technical Account Manager Alan Stevenson, “You don’t want to break-in an engine at idle. You want to keep the rpm above 1,500 and vary the speed continuously for about the first 20 minutes.” After bringing the engine up to normalized coolant and oil temperature, put the engine under load. The cylinder pressure from 50 to 75 percent and eventually to 100 percent load will place additional pressure on the back side of the rings which will quickly establish the proper wear pattern for seating. With today’s rings, especially moly-faced versions, this can be achieved in a very short period of time and certainly within 20 to 30 miles of street driving. In WOT dyno testing, likely the rings are seated by the end of the first few runs."

"Glazing is a term often used when discussing a cylinder that is not broken in properly. This often occurs after an engine has been run at idle or very light load for a sufficient enough time."


From reading this I actually think the RPM limiter is actually an inhibitor to correct break-in. But they can't trust owners to do things right. I wish there was an option to 'do the break-in process on a dyno' and then inspect it.
 

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Was just reading JE Piston's guide to break in (admittedly for a new build, whereas I expect we never see an un-started engine). How to Break-In An Engine

"According to JE’s Senior Technical Account Manager Alan Stevenson, “You don’t want to break-in an engine at idle. You want to keep the rpm above 1,500 and vary the speed continuously for about the first 20 minutes.” After bringing the engine up to normalized coolant and oil temperature, put the engine under load. The cylinder pressure from 50 to 75 percent and eventually to 100 percent load will place additional pressure on the back side of the rings which will quickly establish the proper wear pattern for seating. With today’s rings, especially moly-faced versions, this can be achieved in a very short period of time and certainly within 20 to 30 miles of street driving. In WOT dyno testing, likely the rings are seated by the end of the first few runs."

"Glazing is a term often used when discussing a cylinder that is not broken in properly. This often occurs after an engine has been run at idle or very light load for a sufficient enough time."


From reading this I actually think the RPM limiter is actually an inhibitor to correct break-in. But they can't trust owners to do things right. I wish there was an option to 'do the break-in process on a dyno' and then inspect it.
Regardless of the agreement, the special break-in redline limiter can be reset after less than 400 miles (I think the master mechanic said something around 350, but I don't specifically recall). Thus the 1000 km appears to be a strong recommendation rather than a hard rule. Otherwise they would enforce it.

But you know way more about this than I do.
 

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Regardless of the agreement, the special break-in redline limiter can be reset after less than 400 miles (I think the master mechanic said something around 350, but I don't specifically recall). Thus the 1000 km appears to be a strong recommendation rather than a hard rule. Otherwise they would enforce it.

But you know way more about this than I do.
Yeah I've seen them removed at 400 miles also...I think if you talk to the technicians at BMW about how you did the miles they will listen to common sense.
 

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Very few will use my process and I have this process based on building 100% race engines where clean clean clean cannot be over used in making sure a $50,000 race motor will live.
If "your process" is early and frequent oil changes I 100% agree, but the success of relatively aggressive breakin procedure and the uselessness of 1000 mile (or even 1000 km) breakin interval has been well established for decades.

I had my service done and rev limit derestricted at 500 and no light came on afterward
 

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We've definitely added oil to our M's (2 we have for shop) but nothing crazy. Just check it before each ride and add a little, if needed (you should be doing that anyway). Seen some that on startup or rev have a smokescreen coming out of the exhaust. Ours do not have that issue at all. Coincidentally those that have these issues are the same people that broke the bike in with casual cruises to Starbucks and back.
 

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Its a race bike...its not for starbucks.
Proper break in, proper warm up and care needed.

There isn't one review that says its a daily driver to pop to the shops on. Thats the S1000's job.

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So I guess some owners could race to startbucks and then it will be ok to own the M1000RR!
 

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The issue is solely a problem with the 2 ring piston design. There is even a rumor that BMW Motorrad was going to release a maintenance interval that included remove cylinder head for valve inspection at 20,000 miles. That is still being discussed as to if the public needs to know this and needs to adhere to it.
2 ring design was a concern of mine once they mentioned it before being released.
 

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So I guess some owners could race to startbucks and then it will be ok to own the M1000RR!
Like every Ytube "racer" does.

But i must say that nowadays the high end Ytube racers seem to trailer their bikes to a lay-by, then throw finger gestures at the camera, show their whitened teeth to us poor people, and after that they race away on public highways to get the low IQ crowd jealous.

Many of the most popular ones seem to use an M1000RR, with the latest flash that helps them get semi erect to hold their baggy jeans on.
 

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I still don't understand the appeal of the M for street riders. In many ways it's not as good as the S there. For example, DDC has value on the street. And then the M costs most of double the S.

Its design is centered around gaming the WSBK rules so it can be modified to be a competitive racing platform. So even for track use, especially racing, it only works well when you bin many of the parts and upgrade them with race-grade aftermarket versions.

Most of its appeal appears to be for its looks and relative scarcity. It's pretty and has the "look what I have and you don't" value important to some. It's basically moto jewelry.

At least the HP4 RACE made no pretense (or capability) for street use. For yet another price doubling, you got a really good track bike. I wonder if BMW will produce an M RACE bike in a couple of years?
 

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BMW is following their car model in bikes. M1000RR is here to stay.

It's also the same model most other bike manufacturer follow. All brands have basic and premium sport models. Ducati takes that model to the next level, which I find confusing & useless (base V4, V4S, V4 Speciale, V4R, superleggera), WTF. Kawi, Honda, Yamaha, Aprilia mainly have base & premium, which makes sense.
 

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Just crossed 3000 miles on my M1000, also have changed the oil twice since new…no smoke at start up or idle…also been bren tuned since 600 miles…boy did it ever need it…now have stage 2 installed and it’s doing great along with exhaust replacement and such…brb…gotta get some coffee
 

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I still don't understand the appeal of the M for street riders. In many ways it's not as good as the S there.
I think buyers like the looks and have money to blow, but mainly for the engine - with ti rods it revs much quicker and most people notice that immediately.

With that said you can get a ZX-10RR or even a CBR with ti rods for much less $$ and nearly the same power. Both are making close to 210 rwhp on a dyno with proper ECU tuning (kit ECU in Kawasaki's case). The M looks good but it's way over-priced imo and the suspension is cheap. Aprilia RSV Factory blows it away on value
 

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I think buyers like the looks and have money to blow, but mainly for the engine - with ti rods it revs much quicker and most people notice that immediately.

With that said you can get a ZX-10RR or even a CBR with ti rods for much less $$ and nearly the same power. Both are making close to 210 rwhp on a dyno with proper ECU tuning (kit ECU in Kawasaki's case). The M looks good but it's way over-priced imo and the suspension is cheap. Aprilia RSV Factory blows it away on value
Not saying your wrong with it reving quicker but I’m pretty sure it might do that because of the gearing being different. I’m sure the ti rods help some too. Would be interesting if someone was able to run same mods on both bikes back to back (s vs m) with same gearing for a comparison. I can’t remember if it the m was just up one tooth in the rear or more


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I still don't understand the appeal of the M for street riders. In many ways it's not as good as the S there. For example, DDC has value on the street. And then the M costs most of double the S.

Its design is centered around gaming the WSBK rules so it can be modified to be a competitive racing platform. So even for track use, especially racing, it only works well when you bin many of the parts and upgrade them with race-grade aftermarket versions.
I would agree. Also if you look at the chart bmw put out awhile back you see the S has better low end off idle which is needed for the roads for sure



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The M revs quicker most likely from different gearing. If you are adding oil like half quart every 1k miles and bikes not leaking then its burning it, which in time the piston rings will score the cylinder walls. High revs should show smoke coming out of exhaust.
 

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You can tell if something revs quicker stationary...in neutral...all off the weight loss in the engine will reduce inertial and lead to an ability to change RPM faster both up and down.
 

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The M revs quicker most likely from different gearing. If you are adding oil like half quart every 1k miles and bikes not leaking then its burning it, which in time the piston rings will score the cylinder walls. High revs should show smoke coming out of exhaust.
Most of the time on mine so far the burn off is enough to only create a light oil filming inside the muffler area. The stock Akra muffler really showed this issue alot but the spark muffler I have on there now decease the residual build up and its more just blackish / oily touch.

If you ride the M1000 like it was intended at high RPM's and keep a really good burning fuel in the bike, it will last at least 20000 miles with no issues. If you ride it like commuting to work or coffee stop shopping, you are going to build carbon more based on the oil issue passing the rings than a bad tune in the ECU.

The sole purpose of the 2 ring concept is for less friction, and lighter rotational weight. The 2 ring piston has one compression ring (instead of two) and one oil ring. 2 ring pistons (four stroke) have less drag and can help performance, but, another issue found, some must be replaced more frequently. They do cause less wear on the cylinder too since it has always been found the oil control rings are scrapers and create the wear.

Wisco has been making performance pistons since I can remember building engines back in the 80's. Even in 2 strokes where 2 ring piston was the normal, Wisco made 1 ring pistons for those replacements in the high performance use market.

I am happy to own my M1000RR, but, the way this bike has shown its 'street' issues, I am very happy I also own the S1000RR K67 so I can put more miles on it and less wear and tear of my M1000.
 
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