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Yeah not road legal but also not 2 ring design pistons. They still had 3.

Those are not OEM pistons in the Alpha posting, but, you are correct in that the HP4 RACE was build on the Endurance spec 7.2 engine design. That does use a 3 ring set on the piston. This info is from one of the posted design features of the HP4 RACE during release:

At the center of the HP4 Race is a race-tuned version of the S1000RR’s DOHC four-cylinder engine with an 80 mm bore and 49.7 mm stroke, displacing 999cc. The HP4 engine uses a combination of what BMW calls the 6.2 and 7.2 engine specs, and puts out a claimed 215 bhp at 13,900 rpm, at the crankshaft...........

The M1000RR K66 was clearly designed to do one thing only and that is to make WSBK chances of getting closer to the podium. The engine had to be designed as a production unit and called street legal, but that does not mean it has to get great fuel mileage and keep all the oil in the crank case for 3000 miles. There is no reason for BMW Motorrad to be looking at a replacement engine for the released 'street' version just because some people complain it uses 1/2 quart of oil in 800 miles. Its up to the end user of the product for maintenance. That means checking the chain, the oil level, the water level in the overflow before every ride really. Any out of spec, you fill it / adjust it.

This was also the launch release of the M1000RR K66.. we have to understand what we are buying and how we are going to use it.

The engine of the S1000RR was extensively modified in the direction of racing. The maximum speed was increased by 500 rpm to 15,100 rpm. The engine was fitted with 2-ring forged pistons from Mahle. The combustion chambers were adapted. Longer and lighter titanium connecting rods from Pankl were used. The conrods are narrower and lighter. The intake ducts got a new geometry. Camshafts and intake tract were optimized. The compression was increased to 13.5.
 
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From the dyno charts, and the price, I would never buy an M1000 over an S1000 for the street. To me, there's just not enough there for street use to justify the cost, and the S model makes better and more tractable power for the street anyway (well, once you fix that gaping US-spec midrange hole...). So, I'd agree with the sentiment that the owners who DO use them for street duty need to remember that it really is a racebike for the street, not a streetbike, and not be concerned with oil consumption.
 

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Yep, race engine in S1000RR chassis with a hefty mark-up. Makes no sense as a street profiler, barely makes more power than the standard S1000RR
 

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Honda RRR SP has has a proper race engine that makes more power than M1000, no issues there. Same with Duc V4R & Kawi ZX10RR. So let's not pin it on "race engine".
BMW has work to do. It's rare where manufacturers get first year models without major issues. It's the reason I only buy 2nd year new production bikes. Learned that from issues I had on R1 & S1k.
 

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Bullsh!t. From Brentune: "It was a lot of fun getting to know the CBR and how it works. Up top the bikes are very similar but anything lower than 10k RPM and the S1000RR is the clear winner." And from the dyno chart on their video, the Honda maybe had 1/2 hp advantage near redline, but even the M (which is softer than the S) clearly beat it all through the midrange. So, while, yes, using oil sucks, the Honda isn't the winner here unless that's your metric. If I was in that market, I'd take the BMW any day for the midrange, looks, and the major cost savings.

Well, there are LOTS of us here who have 2015 'RR's that HAVEN'T managed to blow ours up like you did 2 completely different brands of brand new bikes, so, there's that... Maybe just learn NOT to blow them up? 🤣 😛
 

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Honda RRR SP has has a proper race engine that makes more power than M1000, no issues there. Same with Duc V4R & Kawi ZX10RR. So let's not pin it on "race engine".
We're pinning it on the lack of piston rings not tune. 2 isn't common. I bet the Honda is running a conventional number (3).
 

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There is a performance difference in burning the oil vs just leaking it every where.
I once visited a workshop in Yeronga, here in Brisbane, where a guy rebuilt radial engines for planes, war birds and even some for commercial use. Back in the day a lot of air transport out west employed old radial engine planes. I was told everyone went to him because he could get the oil burn rate 'perfect'. I forget the details but it was achieved by precision engineering of the parts, should have seen his boring machine, a killer. When completed he mounted the engine on a flatbed truck, drove it out to Archerfield airport, mounted a prop and ran it for half a day.
 

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We're pinning it on the lack of piston rings not tune. 2 isn't common. I bet the Honda is running a conventional number (3).
Maybe BMW should force their engine engineers to wear a c0ck ring so they know exactly what a difference a ring makes lol.
 

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Maybe people should buy the bike that fits their needs not their ego

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There's a lot of truth to that..... I know I'm not good enough to outride my 2015, and I'm perfectly ok with that. Would I have paid extra for/opted for Brembo t-slots and ugraded master cylinder and calipers and Ohlins suspension when I bought mine? Probably, but I certainly wouldn't buy an M1000 or Honda RRR SP for the street, or track even probably. But then, if I HAD HP4 Race money to burn as excess cash, well, I certainly couldn't use all the performance, but I find them so beautiful and purposeful that I'd probably get one as a true collectable.
 

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I once visited a workshop in Yeronga, here in Brisbane, where a guy rebuilt radial engines for planes, war birds and even some for commercial use. Back in the day a lot of air transport out west employed old radial engine planes. I was told everyone went to him because he could get the oil burn rate 'perfect'. I forget the details but it was achieved by precision engineering of the parts, should have seen his boring machine, a killer. When completed he mounted the engine on a flatbed truck, drove it out to Archerfield airport, mounted a prop and ran it for half a day.
Nice! LOVE those old aircraft engines. Can't tell if that one has the master connecting rod with all the others in the same plane connected to it. I remember reading an old Kevin Cameron article where in those days they didn't have FEA, so, they developed a special lacquer that had specific and consistent properties of hardness. They'd paint an area of known or suspected failure, and run the engine, and then measure the distance between cracks in the lacquer. The closer the cracks were to one another the more stress in that area, and since the properties of the lacquer were known, they could use a formula to calculate actual stress. I seem to remember that was the gist of the article, cool stuff though!
 

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Maybe people should buy the bike that fits their needs not their ego
I don't know if it's ego or what but all I know is that every bike I buy has to be faster than the last or I feel like I'm standing still. It's not that I want to go fast all the time, I just need to know I can and sometimes do. One thing I have learned about this bike is that it rides best when the engine is doing over 6000 and your guts' in the tank.
 

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Guess I was wrong… my M1000RR is burning oil :poop:

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It’s currently at the dealer where they will have to check cylinder compression, etc (BMW sent them a 3 page document).

In the mean time I’ll be driving a S1000R and making a formal complaint to BMW… :cautious:

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While I agree that a $42000 USD motorcycle should not burn/use oil in 800 miles, it was presented as a factory race bike made for the street.

@flyryder had a very long conservation with BMW over the HP4 he had and finally got a credit toward the bike he has now if I remember the story correctly. seems I recall he was told a whole quart of oil in 800 miles was in BMW guide lines. Most I have talked with on the M1000 are falling in the 800 miles range of burning / using a half a quart of oil.
 

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I'm setting up my M for racing and this oil consumption situation is a huge problem. My bike went through the 3 heat cycle method, as I've done for many race motors I've built without issue. The problem lies in BMW selling a race bike in street trim while still forcing the rev limit down our throats when brand new. The M should be broken in on a dyno and allowed to use the entire rev range during the process...

That was not the case and now we have a bunch of people, including myself (~1 quart in 600 miles), that have to deal with oil burning issues. It's disappointing to say the least.
 

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Honda RRR SP has has a proper race engine that makes more power than M1000, no issues there. Same with Duc V4R & Kawi ZX10RR. So let's not pin it on "race engine".
BMW has work to do. It's rare where manufacturers get first year models without major issues. It's the reason I only buy 2nd year new production bikes. Learned that from issues I had on R1 & S1k.
We are more then 2 years in and BMW still hasnt got the K67 right
 

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I'm setting up my M for racing and this oil consumption situation is a huge problem. My bike went through the 3 heat cycle method, as I've done for many race motors I've built without issue. The problem lies in BMW selling a race bike in street trim while still forcing the rev limit down our throats when brand new. The M should be broken in on a dyno and allowed to use the entire rev range during the process...

That was not the case and now we have a bunch of people, including myself (~1 quart in 600 miles), that have to deal with oil burning issues. It's disappointing to say the least.
IMO, all these bikes these days need to be broken in hard. Only BMW sets a limit on rev range! GRRRRR
 

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We are more then 2 years in and BMW still hasnt got the K67 right
With Covid BMW changed things and now needs 3 years to get it right maybe.
That's why I'm not on a Yamaha or a BMW, both proved to be fragile. GSXRs FTW.
 

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IMO, all these bikes these days need to be broken in hard. Only BMW sets a limit on rev range! GRRRRR
Well, being in the Engineering field, I'd have to disagree and say they should be broken in just like the manual says, unless you can babysit it on the dyno and KNOW exactly how to break motors in. But even then you should gradually increase RPM and load, it's just that on a dyno you don't have to deal with traffic and have the ability to set up the thermal and stress cycles exactly the way you want them. I've never believed in the "ride it like you stole it" break-in method. The people that do this usually beat on the bikes and sell the bike long before any issues raise their head. I sold all my motorcycles with over 60k miles on them, my '01 had 79k miles, and they never leaked or burned a drop of oil. I think BMW DID make a bunch of mistakes with this gen, but I think that this is an anomaly. Meanwhile, I'll enjoy my 2015... :)

Can't speak to BMW being the only manufacturer that puts a hard break-in rev limiter on the bike. I know my KTM didn't have one, but the tach DID flash when I went over 7k RPM for the first 620-ish miles when I had my first service.
 
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