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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 28" inseam (long torso) and the bike will be primarily a street bike.
Already did a track day on a 2020 M, with the shortest seat equipped.
TOO HIGH for me.
For reference, I was always comfortable on stock 2005-2008 Suzuki Gixxer 1k's with stock ride heights, which is listed at 31.7 inches.
Not sure if the BMW is wider, which may be making BMW's listed seat height of 32.4 so much taller for me.

In the process of buying the bike right now, so any advice on what options to choose/avoid, and what EXACT method of lowering, with part numbers, would be much appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Change the ride height with the swing arm pivot? and get rear sets to move your feet up.
When I did the BMW organized track event, the BMW engineers told me that I have to buy the M model to get the adjustable swing arm pivot, and it was the only method of lowering they recommended. Don't really want to be forced to spend $3,700 to lower the bike.
Any other options?

On the Suzukis, most guys just buy the Brocks adjustable to lower the bike 1-2 inches.
I can't seem to find something similar for the 2020 S1k.

 

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No idea if this works for the K67, but have read good things about these on the R and XR forums.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
No idea if this works for the K67, but have read good things about these on the R and XR forums.

Thanks for posting.
Those are for the old model s1k.

Anything available for the 2020+ s1k?
Thanks
 

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What about the adjustable rear ride height link thats included with the M package or race package?
Part number: 33-54-8-359-957
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Part number: 33-54-8-359-957

That part # says it's for a 2019, not a 2020.


So, the pivot point can be retrofitted to a NON-M 2020 S1k?
All I want to do is lower the seat height of a 2020 1-2 inches, without screwing up the suspension geometry or electronics.
 

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Honestly man I have friends that ride big bikes that are Pedrosa sized.
If you’re focused on track riding, lowering the bike is not the best option as it will mess up the geometry of the bike.
Your best bet is to get a new spring for the rear shock so that the bike will sag properly. I weigh 160 without gear on and I need a different spring for the rear because the bike doesn’t sag at all for me even with all my gear on.
Then get some rearsets and some clipons to get everything dialed in the best way.
if this will be a dedicated track bikeyou should look into the CRC Racefairings. Motomillion has them and it comes with a laser cut foam pad as a seat that I legitimately think is more comfortable than the OEM seat and it’s thinner.
I’m not sure where you are located but if you are ever down for a track day in the southeast I’m an Instructor with SportbikeTrackTime and I’m at every event unless it’s during a WERA race weekend.
You’re more than welcome to sit on my bike and see what you think.
Also, don’t buy the M. Buy the standard one and upgrade to the race package with the forged wheels
 

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Honestly man I have friends that ride big bikes that are Pedrosa sized.
If you’re focused on track riding, lowering the bike is not the best option as it will mess up the geometry of the bike.
your advice is spot on... but... his first sentence he said the bike will primarily be a street bike.

being a short rider on the track isnt a big deal.... but daily riding on the street really sucks
not everyone is a rossi junior, maybe he just wants to put his feet down ;)

its all the little things that add up over time, like having to tippy toe at every light in stop-n-go traffic, no leverage when trying to back out of a parking spot if the ground isnt perfectly flat, if you start to tip over just a little you have less ability to catch it than someone who is flat footing their bike, if the ground is sandy or loose gravel its very easy for your toe to slip and just one little mistake can end up being expensive drop repair bill.

i have no idea what his riding ability is, but i feel like the average rider probably doesnt have the skill level to get anywhere near the limits of the suspension capabilities to where the change in geometry is going to affect them that much... im guessing if you put an average rider (myself included) on a stock s1k and lowered s1k id probably run the same times on both because my skill level isnt high enough, rider skill would be slowing me down more than any geometry change... but im just speculating, if anyone has done that experiment id be interested to hear!

as you mentioned, best thing to do is have his bikes suspension setup properly for him, whether he lowers it or not, its good advice either way.
 

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Also, don’t buy the M. Buy the standard one and upgrade to the race package with the forged wheels
I'm curious why not the M? For track, to avoid the electronic suspension and potential risks of CF wheels? (Sorry to go OT, and not trying to start an argument - I ordered an M to ride street and track and am interested in your view.)
 

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Aftermarket option for racing and lowering from M1. Nice billet pieces and not cheap.
 

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your advice is spot on... but... his first sentence he said the bike will primarily be a street bike.

being a short rider on the track isnt a big deal.... but daily riding on the street really sucks
Damn I swore that I checked his post for that haha. Maybe a pair of riding boots would help add an inch or so.

I would get BrenTunings option if you’re going to do it, do it the right way

I'm curious why not the M? For track, to avoid the electronic suspension and potential risks of CF wheels? (Sorry to go OT, and not trying to start an argument - I ordered an M to ride street and track and am interested in your view.)
Every dollar adds up when you’re building a track/race bike. DDC suspension aims at handling different road conditions, this is not the case for a race track. The conditions are fairly consistent. So a static suspension system is IMO better for track use and why spend the money for the DDC when you’re going to put a higher quality Ohlins (or Ktech) suspension in there?

also, I think I said this in my post but based on what I’ve observed so far I don’t think the carbon fiber wheels hold temperature as well as the forged wheels.
I’m not worried about the CF wheels letting loose. I go over my bike very thoroughly before I go out on track and as long as I remind my tire guy about the sensors, I’m not concerned about the wheel issues others have had
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Damn I swore that I checked his post for that haha. Maybe a pair of riding boots would help add an inch or so.
I was thinking of starting with a good pair of riding boots with a tall soles to start with.
Any suggestions?
I'm a size 6, extra wide.
Strangely, I fit into size 39 SIDI race boots fine, but they have absolutely no sole. Super flat.

Thanks in advance.
 

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You could look at Daytona, they make boots for women that have a high heel hidden within the boot - my wife has a pair. They are expensive, but very good quality.
 

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I wou
I was thinking of starting with a good pair of riding boots with a tall soles to start with.
Any suggestions?
I'm a size 6, extra wide.
Strangely, I fit into size 39 SIDI race boots fine, but they have absolutely no sole. Super flat.

Thanks in advance.
l only wear GP racing boots so I’m not sure what to recommend other that spend as much money as you can afford to on boots. SIDI/Alpinestars/Dianese

even some of the cheaper Alpinestars boots are really shitty and I almost lost my toes learning this lesson on good boots.
 
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