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you mean to say the drain plug on the k67 is magnetic? Now i feel bad about ordering a "magnetic" drain plug from alpha racing.
It probably has a bigger magnet and is probably drilled for safety wire. Not a bad purchase in any case. But yes, almost all drainplugs have a magnet in them now, and have for years.
 

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I bought my zr1 with 5000 miles so I didnt get to witness that but I have seen videos like this that suggested your couldnt rev past as the ecu limited the car...
You can run the car at any RPM when new. The only thing which happens at 500 miles is the cautionary thin yellow and red lines disappear - as shown in the video.

These thin lines are just a reminder to keep the RPM down during break-in. If you want to be an idiot, you can bounce the engine of the actual real redline with zero miles on the odometer. There is nothing stopping you.

This is just like the cautionary yellow and red lines that are displayed any time the engine is cold. As the engine warms, these lines move to higher RPM. They disappear when the engine reaches 175 degrees. But, again, you can go WOT on a cold engine and blast past these thin reminder lines if you choose.
 

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you mean to say the drain plug on the k67 is magnetic? Now i feel bad about ordering a "magnetic" drain plug from alpha racing.
It happens. Can always sell the alpha one if needed. I didn鈥檛 know at first till someone told me. Some of my other bikes didn鈥檛 come with a magnetic plug stock


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It probably has a bigger magnet and is probably drilled for safety wire. Not a bad purchase in any case. But yes, almost all drainplugs have a magnet in them now, and have for years.
I simply didnt know. My last bike was a 2012 CBR1000RR. I need to research about the advantage of the safety wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
No, actually. Nice try though. The brake issues were Hayes Engineers. The wheel issues were another set of Engineers from the company that made the wheels, etc. The BMW Engineers designed the engine, frame, etc., and sourced the rest. I have 21,000 almost trouble-free miles on my '15, and yes I followed their break-in procedure.
lololol...cmon man really? So these are not the same engineers responsible for the reverse gear failure on the k1600 recall?

*Double gear engagement or transmission damage can cause the rear wheel to lock up, affecting the vehicle stability and increasing the risk of a crash.

Or the cam chain tensioner issues on the K bikes that make them sound like rattlesnakes on startup?

Or how about I go way back to 2004 when the K1200S was coming out and got delayed due to camshaft problems? That motor had so many issues they stopped making it and never really admitted to all of it's design faults. Thats why you can literally pick one up for 3500 bucks used at most places.

Anyone who has been involved in BMW motorcycles since the early 2000's would need an awful long time to fill out all the issues many of there models have had. Dead batteries after a few months of riding, bad key chips that leave you stranded etc etc etc.

I'm not saying they don't build decent stuff, hell I would not have bought my s1rr if they didn't BUT they are no longer the leader in any type of reliability test. Matter of fact they are rated pretty low down on most consumer lists at this point...right next to harley!

Sad but true!
 

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You can run the car at any RPM when new. The only thing which happens at 500 miles is the cautionary thin yellow and red lines disappear - as shown in the video.

These thin lines are just a reminder to keep the RPM down during break-in. If you want to be an idiot, you can bounce the engine of the actual real redline with zero miles on the odometer. There is nothing stopping you.

This is just like the cautionary yellow and red lines that are displayed any time the engine is cold. As the engine warms, these lines move to higher RPM. They disappear when the engine reaches 175 degrees. But, again, you can go WOT on a cold engine and blast past these thin reminder lines if you choose.
A bike can rev to ~15000 RPM. A car, particularly one fitted with a turbo, revs to ~7000 RPM. The mechanical stress is going to be a magnitude higher on a 2x higher revving engine.
 

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lololol...cmon man really? So these are not the same engineers responsible for the reverse gear failure on the k1600 recall?

*Double gear engagement or transmission damage can cause the rear wheel to lock up, affecting the vehicle stability and increasing the risk of a crash.

Or the cam chain tensioner issues on the K bikes that make them sound like rattlesnakes on startup?

Or how about I go way back to 2004 when the K1200S was coming out and got delayed due to camshaft problems? That motor had so many issues they stopped making it and never really admitted to all of it's design faults. Thats why you can literally pick one up for 3500 bucks used at most places.

Anyone who has been involved in BMW motorcycles since the early 2000's would need an awful long time to fill out all the issues many of there models have had. Dead batteries after a few months of riding, bad key chips that leave you stranded etc etc etc.

I'm not saying they don't build decent stuff, hell I would not have bought my s1rr if they didn't BUT they are no longer the leader in any type of reliability test. Matter of fact they are rated pretty low down on most consumer lists at this point...right next to harley!

Sad but true!
I would imagine the engine team for the S1000RR is a different team than other motors. Especially since the 'RR is involved in racing. So, yes, I'd say they were different. Yes, BMW doesn't rate as good as the Japanese, but you knew that going in, and so did I. The ENGINES have been pretty reliable on the 'RR. Also, there is a big difference between an Engineering error and a manufacturing/vendor or metallurgy error. Not knowing the root cause of any of the issues you mentioned I can't say where the actual problem lay. As I said, I've had zero issues except for the "dust in dash" issue which I brought up here since I had a very early build '15.
 

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I'm sure most of you guys are aware of the E92 M3 oil bearing failures, which I believe were a direct result of the 10W-50 oil spec (way too high viscosity) combined with tight bearing tolerances that resulted in many failures and was a colossal blunder. Just shows engineers are human like everyone
 

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Discussion Starter #90
You can run the car at any RPM when new. The only thing which happens at 500 miles is the cautionary thin yellow and red lines disappear - as shown in the video.

These thin lines are just a reminder to keep the RPM down during break-in. If you want to be an idiot, you can bounce the engine of the actual real redline with zero miles on the odometer. There is nothing stopping you.

This is just like the cautionary yellow and red lines that are displayed any time the engine is cold. As the engine warms, these lines move to higher RPM. They disappear when the engine reaches 175 degrees. But, again, you can go WOT on a cold engine and blast past these thin reminder lines if you choose.
What vette do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter #91
I'm sure most of you guys are aware of the E92 M3 oil bearing failures, which I believe were a direct result of the 10W-50 oil spec (way too high viscosity) combined with tight bearing tolerances that resulted in many failures and was a colossal blunder. Just shows engineers are human like everyone
I agree but I can tell everyone on this forum one thing...My Kawasaki ZH2 is an engineering marvel and runs CIRCLES around the BMW engine. I say this with zero bias. The kawasaki engine is sooooo smooth you would almost think it's electric. And keep in mind it's also an engine that easily makes 300hp! The japanese have figured things out and rarely make mistakes. The worst part is they charge far less money for a higher quality bike than the germans!

 

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I agree but I can tell everyone on this forum one thing...My Kawasaki ZH2 is an engineering marvel and runs CIRCLES around the BMW engine. I say this with zero bias. The kawasaki engine is sooooo smooth you would almost think it's electric. And keep in mind it's also an engine that easily makes 300hp! The japanese have figured things out and rarely make mistakes. The worst part is they charge far less money for a higher quality bike than the germans!

Interesting! How many miles do you have on it? That's the turbo, right? Wonder how long-term reliability is/will be...
 

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A bike can rev to ~15000 RPM. A car, particularly one fitted with a turbo, revs to ~7000 RPM. The mechanical stress is going to be a magnitude higher on a 2x higher revving engine.
Actually, no, for a given RPM the car engine is under greater stress. The car's moving parts are much heavier, longer stroke, etc. which is why the redline is lower. Bikes can rev higher as their parts are much lighter, etc.
 

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Actually, no, for a given RPM the car engine is under greater stress. The car's moving parts are much heavier, longer stroke, etc. which is why the redline is lower. Bikes can rev higher as their parts are much lighter, etc.
I thought it was primarily a function of stroke (more torque) vs bore (more rpms). Cars need more torque, thus needing higher strokes. With a higher stroke, the piston speed exceeds safe limits (~25m/s) at > 7000 rpm? Superbikes are mostly oversquare. Tiny strokes, large (relatively speaking) bore. Hence super rev happy.
 

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I agree but I can tell everyone on this forum one thing...My Kawasaki ZH2 is an engineering marvel and runs CIRCLES around the BMW engine. I say this with zero bias. The kawasaki engine is sooooo smooth you would almost think it's electric. And keep in mind it's also an engine that easily makes 300hp! The japanese have figured things out and rarely make mistakes. The worst part is they charge far less money for a higher quality bike than the germans!

Lessee, it's supercharged, so it SHOULD make more power (228 vs 205 - so not a huge increase for being supercharged).

Well, "quality" is different than "reliability". A rock is reliable, but not "high quality", vs a diamond, arguably as "reliable" and just a harder (but FAR more valuable) rock.

And it's $17,000 to start (going to $33,000 for the "Carbon), with the S1000RR starting at $16,995, so, wrong again.

But, since the Japanese have a LOT more money to throw at R&D and testing, I would expect greater reliability.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Lessee, it's supercharged, so it SHOULD make more power (228 vs 205 - so not a huge increase for being supercharged).

Well, "quality" is different than "reliability". A rock is reliable, but not "high quality", vs a diamond, arguably as "reliable" and just a harder (but FAR more valuable) rock.

And it's $17,000 to start (going to $33,000 for the "Carbon), with the S1000RR starting at $16,995, so, wrong again.

But, since the Japanese have a LOT more money to throw at R&D and testing, I would expect greater reliability.
I would not be comparing the carbon to the standard bike...the carbon would be comparable to the M1000 which is more money. I paid 14500 for my Zh2. And yes Kawasaki is a trillion dollar company and bmw is a billion dollar company...huge difference in r/d.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Interesting! How many miles do you have on it? That's the turbo, right? Wonder how long-term reliability is/will be...
Supercharged...I got about 500 miles on her...its a 2020 model. I can't imagine ANYTHING going wrong on this bike. The entire bike oozes quality. Incredibly done!
 

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I would not be comparing the carbon to the standard bike...the carbon would be comparable to the M1000 which is more money. I paid 14500 for my Zh2. And yes Kawasaki is a trillion dollar company and bmw is a billion dollar company...huge difference in r/d.
Well, apples to apples, the 2020 H2 is $17k to start, and so is the BMW. I LOVE the black chrome paint on the H2, and it looks good with the Kawi green I'm partial to (I have a '91 KX500 I bought new), but they're just not for me. Enjoy them both and best of luck NOT having a warranty issue on the BMW!
 
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