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Should I just follow sag numbers suggested in Ohlins manual? Or stick with what the Ohlins distributor sat up?
I say ride it first. It was set to the specs you asked for. You can always adjust to your liking afterward if it is off a bit.

After my Ohlins were installed and set for my weight, I must have had the suspension guys tweak things 5 times. Their ability to help was limited by my inability to communicate exactly what was happening where. :frown2: They could only interpret what I was saying, make their best guess and hope it helped. Results were so so at best. As I've gotten faster, I've done my own analysis of what the suspension is doing and what needs to be done to correct the problem. Unlike the old days when i'd change 2 or three things at the same time because the race was about to start, I just change one thing at a time 1-2 clicks. It's better or worse. So far every change has been for the better. For the most part, I've left sag alone as set by the installer. I added maybe a half turn to the preload on the front. More made things worse.
 

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Just for reference.

My best time on my track only 99 R-sexy was 2:07.

This past Saturday I ran my trusty ol' MyChrony Lite lap timer and did this on East THill.



I believe part of it was due to the extra 400cc and the other is really trusting your skills, tires, and some...

 

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Marquez would had never won anything, if he would have used your logic.
How can one have good laptimes with crappy lines? Failed logic here. If line is bad, entry and exit will be bad ==> poor laptimes.
Gentlemen, I was at COTA this past weekend and finally broke 2:40. I want to thank you both for your virtual coaching and advice, it worked.

I had bad luck with traffic all day even though attendance was low; couldn't manage a clean lap, still I squeezed under 2:40 by a tenth of a second! In reviewing my split times, my new theoretical best is 2:33, which tells me I'm capable of being in the mid to high 30s consistently. Next COTA weekend is Aug 18 & 19.

As always, any improvement advice is appreciated.


 

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Gentlemen, I was at COTA this past weekend and finally broke 2:40. I want to thank you both for your virtual coaching and advice, it worked.
Your line improved at some corners. But at some others you need to tighten it. Next time, for each corner, put exactly where you want to hit the apex. Drop your pace 3% (yes, just 3% = few seconds of laptime) and hit apex for few laps.

Your upper body moves too much, you tend to stay upright or not as tucked in areas where you should be. You tuck on long straights but sitting up higher is limiting your corner entry. There is a fine angle of upper body to saddle, so you can see enough where you wanna go, but at the same time low enough to allow you to lean and hang off the bike. Think about how you can find the sweet spot for your riding style and body type.

Throttle! Def look at how you chop it in/out some of the corners. It's a hard control to get right, but pay attention to it. I still do it sometimes if I'm not paying attention.
 

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Just for reference.

My best time on my track only 99 R-sexy was 2:07.

This past Saturday I ran my trusty ol' MyChrony Lite lap timer and did this on East THill.
can you share the rest of the laps with the class? how many laps did it capture per session?



here is some video from the clubman heavy race

the first, standing lap was my fastest. then i made some mistakes...


 

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Your line improved at some corners. But at some others you need to tighten it. Next time, for each corner, put exactly where you want to hit the apex. Drop your pace 3% (yes, just 3% = few seconds of laptime) and hit apex for few laps.

Your upper body moves too much, you tend to stay upright or not as tucked in areas where you should be. You tuck on long straights but sitting up higher is limiting your corner entry. There is a fine angle of upper body to saddle, so you can see enough where you wanna go, but at the same time low enough to allow you to lean and hang off the bike. Think about how you can find the sweet spot for your riding style and body type.

Throttle! Def look at how you chop it in/out some of the corners. It's a hard control to get right, but pay attention to it. I still do it sometimes if I'm not paying attention.
Thanks, for body position the chin camera was messing me up, not sure I'm going to wear it like that again, it would hit the tank and distract me. Agree on throttle, though I did focus on it, but it's going to be many hours of seat time to get it down.
 

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Gentlemen, I was at COTA this past weekend and finally broke 2:40. I want to thank you both for your virtual coaching and advice, it worked.



I had bad luck with traffic all day even though attendance was low; couldn't manage a clean lap, still I squeezed under 2:40 by a tenth of a second! In reviewing my split times, my new theoretical best is 2:33, which tells me I'm capable of being in the mid to high 30s consistently. Next COTA weekend is Aug 18 & 19.



As always, any improvement advice is appreciated.






Theoretical best lap setup with that many sectors will never be accurate.

Was your bike still on 9k rpm limit? If not, change your gearing and rev the thing.

I’ve just watched a couple of videos that a few of you guys have posted and the biggest thing I see is nobody is actually using a racing line. Just leaning the bike and running the corner until the end and then accelerating. Will probably look good for your lean angle and midcorner speed but laptimes not so much.





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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"It may require extraordinary bravery, but the most productive use of maximum traction is right at the turn entry. The speed you have at turn entry is free. You don’t have to do anything more for it. But any significant speed increases will have to be earned in the hardest and most dangerous ways, with extra mid-turn and exit acceleration." -Keith Code 1982
 

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"It may require extraordinary bravery, but the most productive use of maximum traction is right at the turn entry. The speed you have at turn entry is free. You don’t have to do anything more for it. But any significant speed increases will have to be earned in the hardest and most dangerous ways, with extra mid-turn and exit acceleration." -Keith Code 1982
my maximum braking was limited last round and so to ride around the issue i increased my entry and mid corner speed, however i was late in most of my actions

do you have a tip on how to increase my rate of visual marker acquisition? how can i train this eye discipline off track?

thank you :smile2::nerd:
 

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Watch a lot of video of someone faster than you going around the track. It's what all the racers do to learn the racing line. Preferably a camera mounted on the front of the bike for clarity. I watch a lot of ken hill's r6 videos when i was learning thunderhill. helped a bunch.
 

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my maximum braking was limited last round and so to ride around the issue i increased my entry and mid corner speed, however i was late in most of my actions

do you have a tip on how to increase my rate of visual marker acquisition? how can i train this eye discipline off track?

thank you :smile2::nerd:
Rate of visual marker acquisition is a good question this is my answer if I understand your question: Pick minor reference points that lead you to your major ones e.g. braking marker, apex, turn-in. So, some sort of "pre-apex" between turn-in and apex. If you have too few reference points, things will seem to jump up at you faster. Humans see at 60hz, flys see at 240hz; things appear to move four times slower to flys compared to humans.
 

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Theoretical best lap setup with that many sectors will never be accurate.

Was your bike still on 9k rpm limit? If not, change your gearing and rev the thing.

I’ve just watched a couple of videos that a few of you guys have posted and the biggest thing I see is nobody is actually using a racing line. Just leaning the bike and running the corner until the end and then accelerating. Will probably look good for your lean angle and midcorner speed but laptimes not so much.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Are you saying I was driving the S1000RR like Ms. Daisy? LOL, you're right, I can definitely push the engine harder and crank it like it was meant to be.

I have stock gearing I was just being a puss on the corners and not opening her up. That's my next phase of learning, right now I need to focus on lines and throttle as others have pointed out. I can only handle 2, maybe 3 things to work on in a trackday. Appreciate the feedback.
 

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Rate of visual marker acquisition is a good question this is my answer if I understand your question: Pick minor reference points that lead you to your major ones e.g. braking marker, apex, turn-in. So, some sort of "pre-apex" between turn-in and apex. If you have too few reference points, things will seem to jump up at you faster. Humans see at 60hz, flys see at 240hz; things appear to move four times slower to flys compared to humans.
Dylan, you should post that video of the avg rider vs. racer that shows eye movement.
 

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Are you saying I was driving the S1000RR like Ms. Daisy? LOL, you're right, I can definitely push the engine harder and crank it like it was meant to be.

I have stock gearing I was just being a puss on the corners and not opening her up. That's my next phase of learning, right now I need to focus on lines and throttle as others have pointed out. I can only handle 2, maybe 3 things to work on in a trackday. Appreciate the feedback.
lol.. you don't need to be ringing off the limiter every gear but up above 13k atleast unless you need to short shift. also, using the higher revs and lower gear will give more engine brake and help slow the bike down and turn into the corner easier. Being so low in the revs can also cause the bike to wheelie more as the RPM climb fast compared to exiting the corner with the RPM already near the peak torque/power range.
 

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That problem I know. But you said my mindset is the problem. Are you referring to the same thing?

How do I fix my turn-in to apex problem? Line is one part of it, but there is brake, brake release, and throttle. Which I hear a different answer for from each faster rider/instructor I speak to. I plan to reduce pace, focus on line. But don't have a plan for other areas. I need pragmatic guidance and instructions.
The problem is that you choose to be stupid. You keep asking the very same questions over and over again, and you are waiting the answer to be different. That is a clear sign of supidity. But, as I said, that is your own choice. You choose to act that way. I can not say anyting which would satisfy you, because the ansver is not the ansver you want to hear.

A bit related to that, one average joe, who has now done only about 15 track days with almost stock 11 year old 600cc, and he is only 6 seconds slower than 1000cc track record. Why? Because he sticks to basics, and is not using time and energy to invent "new" questions all the time. He is fixin things every time he gets on a track.

Simply, he has the correct mindset.
 
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