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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those interested in blocking/plugging the PAIR valve, here are some pics to help know where it's at and one method of plugging it. I went to the hardware store and bought an assortment of Rubber Plugs/Stoppers. It takes a small/medium one for the valve and a pretty small one for the hose that attaches to the valve. You could also go into the airbox and plug one hole there instead of plugging both of the ones I did... I just figured this achieved the same end result and I didn't have to "dig in" any further than the top panels of the tank. You would want to do this if you were running a PCV and going to a dyno shop to get a custom tune OR if you were running an AutoTuner w/the PCV. If you're doing the latter, you'll want to keep these plugged. If you're doing the former (just doing a custom map/dyno), DynoJet says you need to plug them while doing the map so you get accurate AFR readings and then when you're done you can either leave it plugged or pull the plugs back out and reattach the hose/fitting to the PAIR Valve. Some have said that on occasion you may get some popping on deceleration with the PAIR valve operating normally (no plugs).

1) Remove Top Tank Plastic
2) Remove Seat
3) Remove right side Tank Plastic
4) Pinch hose connection and remove hose from PAIR Valve (Photo 1)
5) Plug Valve w/medium size rubber plug (Photo 2)
6) Plug hose w/smaller rubber plug (Photo 3)
7) Tuck hose in front of electical wires as shown in Photo 3
8) Reinstall side tank plastic, top tank plastic, and seat

PHOTO 1: This picture shows me pointing at the PAIR Valve


PHOTO 2: This pictures shows me pointing at the PAIR Valve after the hose has been removed and I put in the rubber plug.


PHOTO 3: This pictures shows me pointing at the 90* fitting on top of the hose that was removed in Step 4 and shows a small rubber plug that has been inserted into the hose fitting
 

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thanks for the step-by-step with photos! This won't take very long to do.

btw, where did you get the rubber block-off cap for the PAIR valve?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Already raping your new bike lol you guys are crazy There fast enough out of the box!
Bad habits (or good ones depending on how you look at it) die hard ;)

thanks for the step-by-step with photos! This won't take very long to do.

btw, where did you get the rubber block-off cap for the PAIR valve?
I just went to the local hardware store in the nuts/bolts section and found some rubber stoppers/plugs. They are usually in those racks of pull out trays you find in most hardware store. I bought the 4 smallest sizes they had. They aren't too expensive so you can save some for later or another project some day. I was going to also put tape around them to ensure they held, but once I got the plugs in there real good, they are fixed in there pretty good.
 

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to be totally certain, I might dab a bit of silicone gasket sealant on the PAIR valve cover, since that plug will see positive air pressure. Maybe the other part too - wonder where the other end of the hose plugs into the exhaust? To be fastidious and anal, I'd actually remove the hose and plug the exhaust, just so that exhaust gases can't leak up there. A minor thing, but if you're not that picky, you're not really an obsessive tuner :)
 

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to be totally certain, I might dab a bit of silicone gasket sealant on the PAIR valve cover, since that plug will see positive air pressure. Maybe the other part too - wonder where the other end of the hose plugs into the exhaust? To be fastidious and anal, I'd actually remove the hose and plug the exhaust, just so that exhaust gases can't leak up there. A minor thing, but if you're not that picky, you're not really an obsessive tuner :)
Normally through the cam cover, then a reed valve (one way valve) before entering the exhaust port
 

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to be totally certain, I might dab a bit of silicone gasket sealant on the PAIR valve cover, since that plug will see positive air pressure. Maybe the other part too - wonder where the other end of the hose plugs into the exhaust? To be fastidious and anal, I'd actually remove the hose and plug the exhaust, just so that exhaust gases can't leak up there. A minor thing, but if you're not that picky, you're not really an obsessive tuner :)
The Air Tube can be easily removed.There are two screws for it.You have to remove the Evap canistor to get to it.I just replaced my sparkplugs lastnight,and you have to lift the (air)tube to remove the coil packs.I'll post up a pick of the plugs 25 bucks a piece from bmw.I looked into the cylinders with my probe camera to inspect everyting looked great inside to.Be really careful when you lift the coil packs out.And when installing them you have to push hard down to seat them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
to be totally certain, I might dab a bit of silicone gasket sealant on the PAIR valve cover, since that plug will see positive air pressure. Maybe the other part too - wonder where the other end of the hose plugs into the exhaust? To be fastidious and anal, I'd actually remove the hose and plug the exhaust, just so that exhaust gases can't leak up there. A minor thing, but if you're not that picky, you're not really an obsessive tuner :)
Good point... I just didn't want to put anything permanent at this point in case I wanna throw it back on. I guess the good thing is if it blows out, no harm... just loose the plug. I've got an extra. I'll ride it like that for a while and check it down the road. I think it'll be fine, that plug is in there pretty darn good - but time will tell.
 

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yeah, the pragmatic approach would be to do just what you did - reversibility could be very important. But its also helpful to have that info if and when we do ditch the PAIR system for good.

btw, my bike doesn't have an charcoal evap can - BMW only puts them on US market bikes.
 

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Already raping your new bike lol you guys are crazy There fast enough out of the box!
This mod will not increase performance, it gets rid of the popping when you change the exhaust. Now, if you want to do a PCV, then you also need to do this before your dyno run to get a proper A/F reading.

But I agree, it's fast enough out of the box.
 

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with a PCV and Autotune sitting on my desk at the moment, disconnecting the PAIR system is a requirement, not an option.
 

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does anyone know 100% if doing this effects any thing with the bike? And is the only reason its on the bike is to just add air to the exhaust to make sure the fuel is all burnt up? So does this mean there is burning fuel in the exhaust all the time?
 

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Smog Block Offs

This mod effects the bike by cutting down on the amount off popping during deceleration.The popping is caused by a lean condition caused by letting off the throttle at a high RPM situation and the PAIR system is allowing air into the exhaust to burn off Hydrocarbons(unburnt fuel) in order to lower emissions.This mod is necessary for the autotune because if the PAIR system is left in place with the autotune it will get false readings and richen the mixture to compensate.If you do not run the autotune but just the PC5 you could pinch off the air supply temp. to just get the dyno custom tune and after unpinch the system and there would be no harm.This is what I would do. If you run the Autotune you have to block off the system permanently.I would just go with the PC 5 alone and a custom dyno tune for your best results , unless you are going to do alot of elevation changes or cross country touring , then I would run the autotune.If this last scenarrio is you I would also wire a toggle switch to switch between the autotune and the base map for your application because the autotune can overcompensate if left on too long.
 

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pros and cons

SOME CONS ARE THAT SOME BIKES RUN RICHER AFTER THIS MOD AND LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES SMELLING OF GAS.Another con is that the rear section can get yellow stains from the extra fuel as well.

Pros-not all bikes do this-run rich and blow hydrocarbonns out the exhaust to stink up clothes and yellow stain rear tail section.Pro-decreased popping on decel.Pro-accurate air/fuel ratio for tuning.Pro-less complicated servicing of engine.
 

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SOME CONS ARE THAT SOME BIKES RUN RICHER AFTER THIS MOD AND LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES SMELLING OF GAS.Another con is that the rear section can get yellow stains from the extra fuel as well.

Pros-not all bikes do this-run rich and blow hydrocarbonns out the exhaust to stink up clothes and yellow stain rear tail section.Pro-decreased popping on decel.Pro-accurate air/fuel ratio for tuning.Pro-less complicated servicing of engine.
Marky - do you have any idea about how in-accurate the air/fuel ratio get because of this Pair Valve ? - are talking about just a few % or .... ?

Thanks
 

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does anyone know 100% if doing this effects any thing with the bike? And is the only reason its on the bike is to just add air to the exhaust to make sure the fuel is all burnt up? So does this mean there is burning fuel in the exhaust all the time?
A high performance engine always passes some fuel into the exhaust 'unburnt' all the system does is add some more air (oxygen) which burns any left over hydrocarbons whether they be from fuel or oil.

removing it will not cause the bike to run any different, you may get a slightly smelly coat and your exhaust may look darker but the engine will perform the same and un at the same A/F ratio, the ecu operates the 'pair' system so also knows when to ignore the lambda senosr reading as well
 

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I've been thinking - when I get to tinkering with the exhaust and install my PCV, I think running extra hose to a remote mechanical stopcock valve will allow one to open or close the PAIR valve at will. Ideally, such a valve would be placed someplace accessible, without having to remove body panels.

I like the PAIR system, and the flames and pops it produces when you run an open pipe and Power Commander - more extra fuel to light off. But for tuning, being able to quickly shut it off to get accurate AFR readings for my Autotune, would be very handy.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I've been thinking - when I get to tinkering with the exhaust and install my PCV, I think running extra hose to a remote mechanical stopcock valve will allow one to open or close the PAIR valve at will. Ideally, such a valve would be placed someplace accessible, without having to remove body panels.

I like the PAIR system, and the flames and pops it produces when you run an open pipe and Power Commander - more extra fuel to light off. But for tuning, being able to quickly shut it off to get accurate AFR readings for my Autotune, would be very handy.
Probably wouldn't be too hard to rig something up and drill a small hole in your right side tank plastic where a 1/4 turn valve knob could show through... since that is really close to where the valve is located.
 
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