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Blow air from the top if you don't want to remove it.
 
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For most washes, I push through the end of a light towel with a ruler, remove the ruler, and then move the towel up-down from both ends across the shield width. When I need to remove the windshield (e.g., remove the mirrors for track prep), i take it inside and thoroughly wash it with soap and sponge and dry it before putting it back on.
 

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Try this: Take a microfiber cloth and a fishing weight, with some string. Maybe wrap some tape around the weight, then thread a long string thru it and a small hole in the cloth. Wet the cloth with soapy water, then carefully thread the weight down between the shield and the black plastic until you can reach the string and pull the cloth down between there to move back and forth to clean. On my 2015, I can get a Scott shop paper towel (blue) down thru there without the weight. I find those work REALLY well to wash your bike because they won't scratch your paint, are better than sponges for scrubbing bug guts/tar/tre sap etc. off your paint, and if you drop them on the driveway (or in the dirt) you just throw them away instead of trying to wash the grit out of the sponge or microfiber cloth. I find they kinda work like doing the clay bar thing, and are a lot cheaper and easier.

Good luck!
 

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Try this: Take a microfiber cloth and a fishing weight, with some string. Maybe wrap some tape around the weight, then thread a long string thru it and a small hole in the cloth. Wet the cloth with soapy water, then carefully thread the weight down between the shield and the black plastic until you can reach the string and pull the cloth down between there to move back and forth to clean. On my 2015, I can get a Scott shop paper towel down thru there without the weight. I find those work REALLY well to wash your bike because they won't scratch your paint, are better than sponges for scrubbing bug guts/tar/tre sap etc. off your paint, and if you drop them on the driveway (or in the dirt) you just throw them away instead of trying to wash the grit out of the sponge or microfiber cloth. I find they kinda work like doing the clay bar thing, and are a lot cheaper and easier.

Good luck!
You could put a long zip-tie through the corner of a cloth, zip it, and then use the length to fish it through. Keep it for that specific purpose. There are lots of ways to accomplish the same thing. Ultimately you want each ends of a cloth on the ends of the windshield so you can saw it back and forth.
 

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I understand that BMW did that for aero purposes, but it DOES make it a mite difficult. It's worse on my KTM because there's a gap like like that on both side, and though MUCH easier to get behind the shield, unlike on the BMW, there's MUD that gets up in there... WAY easier to scratch the shield at that point.
 

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Easy way, take off screen or get a darker screen so you wont see it. I dont get everyone using water and soap to clean bikes though. Honda pro polish, micro fiber cloth, rags and WD40 is all thats needed.
 

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+1 on paper Blue Towels, been using for years and I never take a hose to my bike and have to travel over 2 miles of dirt road for every ride. It gets real dirty, a wet Blue Towel works great and never scratches or leaves even micro "spider webs".
 

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+1 on paper Blue Towels, been using for years and I never take a hose to my bike and have to travel over 2 miles of dirt road for every ride. It gets real dirty, a wet Blue Towel works great and never scratches or leaves even micro "spider webs".
Yeah, I stumbled on that years ago. Whenever you drop a sponge you have to make sure you get all the grit out of it (almost impossible) or you just scratch your paint. I don't use sponges anymore, for my car, I have one of those mitts that can't come off. But for the most part, I basically use soft brushes first (that can't get dirt embedded in them to scratch the paint) then go over it with a Scott shop towel. I then run my soapy hands over the paint so I can feel anything still stuck to the paint. I've never had an issue with the towels being too rough on the paint, and if you drop one, throw it away so you don't scratch your paint like with a sponge.
 
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