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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Sell it.... Otherwise I think it's a very small price to pay for a damn good motorcycle.
Would CF frame covers help with the heat?


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This is the direction i was going originally. Yea it gets hot, no it's not a big enough deal to sell it.... but as a new S1krr owner, i was simply trying to have a friendly conversation about how this can be prevented by asking experienced owners who know this bike way better than myself.
Selling is not even in my vocabulary, but thanks for the advice. Moving on....
 

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My second question is, is it normal for the bike to be running around 220 degrees(f) ? That seems a little to hot for me!
It's normal, don't worry. Pick up some speed and it cools off pretty quickly.

I have some engine ice but I'm waiting till my first service to replace it.
No need for it. The bike runs very well 100% stock.

BTW, your questions are very common. People seem to have a hard time believing that these are normal parameters for a race replica engine.
 

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Rode today in ambient temperatures of 100 degrees F. Heat from the bike was noticeable but not an issue. Didn't notice undue heat in my boots or from the frame. The heat is nothing compared to my prior bike, a Panigale. I am guessing that different size riders contact the bike differently which explains why some find the bike hotter than others.
The size of the rider is irrelevant when dealing with the way the pegs sometimes heat up....unless you're too short to reach the pegs..... :)
 

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BTW, your questions are very common. People seem to have a hard time believing that these are normal parameters for a race replica engine.


If you ask @z00, it's a street bike because it has lights. As such, it should act a certain way. Don't you dare call this a race engine. Not even a race replica engine. Never mind this bike makes 50hp more than what liter bikes made several years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
It's normal, don't worry. Pick up some speed and it cools off pretty quickly.



No need for it. The bike runs very well 100% stock.

BTW, your questions are very common. People seem to have a hard time believing that these are normal parameters for a race replica engine.
After an air filter change i think it would cool it down a little. I rode it 500 miles last weekend and rode it pretty hard on the Blue Ridge Parkway and it was actually running pretty cool, on top of that it was about 70 degrees on the mtn. (6,000 feet) after riding it the past 2 weeks i guess it just gets stupid hot riding around in the city. So far that is my ONLY complaint about it. Feels like I'm riding a beefed up 675.
What tires are you guys running on it? Mine came with Bridgestone S20's and I've never been a big fan of Bridgestone but they did ok carving up the mountains, except they don't have much of a "drop-off" like the Q3's i usually run.
 

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The size of the rider is irrelevant when dealing with the way the pegs sometimes heat up....unless you're too short to reach the pegs..... :)
The hot foot phenomenm is curious. I have never experienced it even on hots days here in the southwest. Perhaps different boots conduct heat or are insulated differently.
 

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My new boots don't transfer heat through the pegs like my old ones. But that doesn't help the frame heat. I only feel it in jeans though, on the track it's a non issue. Just don't lean against it accidentally. It's akin to rubbing the brake rotor when checking air pressure. Nice searing flesh sounds wake you up quick.
 

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The hot foot phenomenm is curious. I have never experienced it even on hots days here in the southwest. Perhaps different boots conduct heat or are insulated differently.
I notice it when I've been stuck in slow-moving/stopped traffic for a while. If I can keep some airspeed over the cats, it's ok. But if you sit there, the cats cook the engine block, which heats the frame, which heats the pegs. Different boots are going to conduct heat differently, but the pegs still get hot. Try getting stuck in stop-and-go for an hour, then pull over and (carefully) touch the pegs with bare fingers. Those cats are running at 800-1,600deg F!!!
 

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Has anybody done the ceramic coating on the exhaust? I would think that it would help reduce the temps to a more tolerable level.
 

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From what I remember, a ceramic coating (Jet-Hot, etc.) was designed in aerospace more to prevent erosion of the area (i.e. inside the pipe) exposed to hot gases. It DOES help with keeping the heat in the pipe to a degree, but I don't think it's as effective as wrapping the pipes. And, you cannot coat the inside of the pipes because of the cats, and wrapping or even coating the headers may damage or destroy them. I haven't had time to try and find a number at BMW yet that actually gets me to an Engineer who can answer my questions.
 

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From what I remember, a ceramic coating (Jet-Hot, etc.) was designed in aerospace more to prevent erosion of the area (i.e. inside the pipe) exposed to hot gases. It DOES help with keeping the heat in the pipe to a degree, but I don't think it's as effective as wrapping the pipes. And, you cannot coat the inside of the pipes because of the cats, and wrapping or even coating the headers may damage or destroy them. I haven't had time to try and find a number at BMW yet that actually gets me to an Engineer who can answer my questions.
Maybe this Video will help? Watch it from the 5min to 8min point!
I know this shows a BIG BLOCK chevy motor being tested but it sure gets the point across!

 

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The internal temps of most catalytic converters are around 1300F - 1600F degrees. >:) To handle those temps I believe most converters outer shells are made out of an inconel alloy. So I think it should easily be able to handle the extra internal heat reflected back by a ceramic coating. :wink2:
 

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I noticed the frame heat today on a canyon ride. Ambient temperature was mid-80's F. Funny, I recently rode in higher temps and didn't notice the frame heat. Not sure why the difference. Also, notice it on right side more than left. Coolant temps above 195 F seem to make for a hotter frame than those in the 170's, which isn't surprising, but what IS surprising is how quickly the frame seems to cool when you get some speed and the temps drop into the low 180's and below. I may have been riding slower today, which contributes to the heating, but it was hot...definitely.

Would be curious to know what temps you guys register on your bikes when riding canyons in 80 degree or higher weather.
 

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^ mine is around 190-200F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Would be curious to know what temps you guys register on your bikes when riding canyons in 80 degree or higher weather.[/QUOTE]

As long as you keep it moving i would say it stays around 190 but as soon as you stop, it takes no time to heat up to 220-230, which seems crazy to me. My ZX-10r never got anywhere near that hot.
 
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