BMW S1000RR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Apparently 2010 & 2011 S1000RRs (and 50,000 other BMWs) had a recall for defective plastic parts (fuel pump, flange) where the gas line connects at the bottom rear of the tank.

My 2012 (built in 2011) now has the a gas leak at the same place when the motor is running.

BMW won't do anything to help because no recall shows up for my VIN. The dealer said it would be about $1,000 to replace the defective parts ($651 parts plus labor, towing, tax etc).

I'm posting this in case it helps others whose bike has developed a gas smell or leak.

Does anyone have experience with replacing these defective parts or know where I can buy them at a lower cost?

I'm hoping that BMW will eventually extend the recall to cover later affected motorcycles but this needs to be fixed before I ride.

Here's an article on the recall:
https://www.autoblog.com/2014/01/07/bmw-motorrad-recall-fuel-pump-flange-leak/#slide-0

quoting:
"Sam Campbell, BMW of North America’s Department Head of Safety Engineering and Intelligent Transportation Systems, states, “This recall involves the fuel pump, and also the auxiliary fuel pump on applicable models. Due to excessive loads on the fuel pump flange in the area of the quick connector during motorcycle servicing, ductile cracks may develop in the plastic flange. Excessive loads can be generated during improper removal and insertion of the quick connector, or by removing the fuel tank prior to disconnecting the fuel line. Further damage can be caused by corrosive material/fluids. Over time this could affect the seal between the flange and the flange housing.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Apparently 2010 & 2011 S1000RRs (and 50,000 other BMWs) had a recall for defective plastic parts (fuel pump, flange) where the gas line connects at the bottom rear of the tank.

My 2012 (built in 2011) now has the a gas leak at the same place when the motor is running.

BMW won't do anything to help because no recall shows up for my VIN. The dealer said it would be about $1,000 to replace the defective parts ($651 parts plus labor, towing, tax etc).

I'm posting this in case it helps others whose bike has developed a gas smell or leak.

Does anyone have experience with replacing these defective parts or know where I can buy them at a lower cost?

I'm hoping that BMW will eventually extend the recall to cover later affected motorcycles but this needs to be fixed before I ride.

Here's an article on the recall:
https://www.autoblog.com/2014/01/07/bmw-motorrad-recall-fuel-pump-flange-leak/#slide-0

quoting:
"Sam Campbell, BMW of North America’s Department Head of Safety Engineering and Intelligent Transportation Systems, states, “This recall involves the fuel pump, and also the auxiliary fuel pump on applicable models. Due to excessive loads on the fuel pump flange in the area of the quick connector during motorcycle servicing, ductile cracks may develop in the plastic flange. Excessive loads can be generated during improper removal and insertion of the quick connector, or by removing the fuel tank prior to disconnecting the fuel line. Further damage can be caused by corrosive material/fluids. Over time this could affect the seal between the flange and the flange housing.”


Maybe try a different dealer? I would think a recall is a recall and if it hasn’t been fixed and documented they should fix it free of charge


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
Apparently 2010 & 2011 S1000RRs (and 50,000 other BMWs) had a recall for defective plastic parts (fuel pump, flange) where the gas line connects at the bottom rear of the tank.

My 2012 (built in 2011) now has the a gas leak at the same place when the motor is running.

BMW won't do anything to help because no recall shows up for my VIN. The dealer said it would be about $1,000 to replace the defective parts ($651 parts plus labor, towing, tax etc).

I'm posting this in case it helps others whose bike has developed a gas smell or leak.

Does anyone have experience with replacing these defective parts or know where I can buy them at a lower cost?

I'm hoping that BMW will eventually extend the recall to cover later affected motorcycles but this needs to be fixed before I ride.

Here's an article on the recall:
https://www.autoblog.com/2014/01/07/bmw-motorrad-recall-fuel-pump-flange-leak/#slide-0

quoting:
"Sam Campbell, BMW of North America’s Department Head of Safety Engineering and Intelligent Transportation Systems, states, “This recall involves the fuel pump, and also the auxiliary fuel pump on applicable models. Due to excessive loads on the fuel pump flange in the area of the quick connector during motorcycle servicing, ductile cracks may develop in the plastic flange. Excessive loads can be generated during improper removal and insertion of the quick connector, or by removing the fuel tank prior to disconnecting the fuel line. Further damage can be caused by corrosive material/fluids. Over time this could affect the seal between the flange and the flange housing.”

when you go to this website

https://www.nhtsa.gov/recalls?vin=WB1051706BZV42812#vin

this VIN of this 2011 has not had the recall. It clearly shows

FUEL PUMP FLANGE: On certain model year 2005 through 2011 R-model motorcycles, model year 2005 through 2012 K-model motorcycles, model year 2010 and 2011 S 1000 RR motorcycles, and model year 2006 through 2010 HP2 motorcycles, the fuel pump flange (and the auxiliary fuel pump flange if equipped) could develop cracks and leak fuel.

if you VIN does not show to need this recall, it must have already been done. This also does not read exactly the same as what you posted, but i do see where it indicates that the fuel pump can be replaced as an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info and link.

The parts have not been replaced under a recall. I've owned it since new and the only time the tank may have been off is for the con rod bolt recall in 2012.

I'll take the tank off to find the exact location/defective part. It just bugs me to financially reward BMW for making a defective part by buying a second one from them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,476 Posts
You should try the "Google Custom Search" box right below the menu line and type in what you want to know. Just type in "Fuel Pump Flange" and you will see a bunch of threads if you haven't already.

Here is a good summary for you - right here on this forum:

https://www.s1000rrforum.com/forum/bmw-s1000rr-general-discussion/236760-fuel-leak-after-filling-up.html

BMW Corporate has been known to pay half for a squeaky wheel even after the campaign was closed.

Our sister forum "K-Bikes.com" had a number of threads on the same topic. When I owned a K1200GT, the place to go for parts (metal flange) to replace the cracking plastic flange was at Beemer Boneyard (https://www.beemerboneyard.com/fuelsystem.html). For about $40 a number of guys replaced their own flanges. I'd give them a call and see if the replacement flange is the same on the "K", R", and "S" bikes. The recall notice went out to all those models.

Or first, look at the microfiche parts listings for all those models at a on-line dealer that provides that service.

Good luck.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,405 Posts
Once the leak has started I don't see any other option except replacing the flange. The dealer could install a reinforcing ring if there was no leak, but mostly they replaced the complete pump assembly. It would be worth it to have a look because it may just be the clamp on the male fitting at the end of the fuel line that's leaking, not the flange.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,258 Posts
Here is the story. The fuel pump flange cracks. They fitted metal support rings which dont always fix the problem. They crack under the metal support ring. Here in AU. We still honour the recall whether it has been done or not. Sometimes 4 or 5 times we still cover it. You simply can't not cover it. On what basis can it be denied? The dealer needs to cover it. If not, take it to BMW NA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for the very useful replies -- much appreciated.

"Sometimes 4 or 5 times we still cover it." Does this mean that the replacement pumps continue to crack?

On a trip, my friend's K1200 started dumping gas on his leg from a cracked tank quick disconnect. I'm thinking plastic shouldn't be used on fuel delivery parts. This video echos my thoughts and might give you a laugh:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Is this the metal support ring? The leak appears to be a pin-point stream right at the pipe threads of the quick disconnect but I can see no cracks on either part.

I hoped I could just replace the pump (about $160 from Beemer Boneyard) but the leak is not at the pump itself. The BMW "fuel-pump assembly" costs around $500 at the local dealer.

Interestingly, it does not leak with the key on; it only leaks when the engine is running.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,405 Posts
Just pick up another pump assembly off of eBay, there are lots floating around if you can't be bothered fighting with the dealer.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
Just pick up another pump assembly off of eBay, there are lots floating around if you can't be bothered fighting with the dealer.
This is what I would do also. Feeeeebay..

I have purchased at least 10 pump assemblies off ebay.

Here is what to look for...

you must have 10/11 version. 12-14 is different, and all others too 15-19

pick one that is very shiny White. Dont get one that is yellow tint looking. The fuel sat in the tank from not riding it if the color has gone yellow tint.

you dont need the fuel level sensor and it just plugs into the fuel pump housing on the inside. The fuel level sensor is very difficult to get released inside the tank anyway, so avoid replacing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thank you for the input.

Maybe the gas is leaking from cracks under the metal ring, but to me the photo makes it look like the gas is squirting straight down from the threads, not ricocheting off them.

Examining the flange under 8x magnification however shows no crack there. I wonder if during the con rod recall, the shop installed the metal ring but didn't tighten the fitting enough or applied a sealant that eventually dissolved by gas.

Therefore, I'm going to glue the fitting in with JB Weld and test it. If the housing is cracked where I can't see, I have nothing to lose.

My other thought is that this fuel pump assembly problem has nothing to do with vibration or stress from mishandling. I'd guess it's due to the expanding force from tightening a small pipe thread into a plastic flange/housing. Every extra turn of the fitting generates a lot of force to split the flange. The general rule is to tighten plastic pipe threads only one to two turns after finger tight. But this application requires the hose to be pointing in one specific direction, so the fitting can easily be over tightened to get it to that position.

In any case, sealing off pressurized fuel by tightening a pipe fitting into a small plastic female flange is a very poor design that has a significant chance of cracking and leaking as the plastic parts naturally become more brittle with heat and age.

My current plan is to use minimal tightening of the fitting, use cement to seal, and perhaps use a brass fitting in hopes of preventing getting stranded somewhere for days with a big bill.


The following info may be of interest. It's about PVC but applies to other plastics too.
Because the threads are tapered, additional turns cause the female part to stretch or undergo "strain." This will split the female fitting just as a wedge, driven by a sledgehammer, will split a tree stump.
The amount of strain increases as the size of the pipe decreases. Therefore it is easier to split smaller diameter threaded joints than larger ones. It is also easier to over-torque smaller diameter fittings because their resistance to torque is less.
The right way to assemble a threaded PVC joint-Schedule 40 or 80 is finger tight plus one to two turns-no more.
Don't use Teflon tape, Teflon paste or pipe dope. Do use a sealant.
Teflon tape, Teflon paste and pipe dope is intended for metal pipe and fittings. Metal to metal fitting joints are more difficult to tighten than plastic; the surfaces tend to gall without the aid of such lubricants as Teflon or pipe dope. Plastic fittings do not need this lubrication.
When Teflon tape is wrapped around plastic male threads it adds to the strain and tensile stress. The tendency of most installers is to incorrectly wrap several thickness of tape around the male threads, increasing stain and stress further.
Teflon paste and pipe dope, just like Teflon tape, make threaded joints slippery. Their use on PVC fittings can be an invitation to over-torque.
When working with threaded plastic fittings do use a proper sealant. The right sealant for threaded joints is non-hardening, compatible with plastic and doesn't add slipperiness.
A non-hardening compound is forced by water pressure into potential points of leakage, thereby performing a true sealing function. Tapes and hardening pastes permit a leak path to develop when a joint is backed off, mechanically flexed, or expands with rising temperatures.
A sealing compound must be compatible to plastics. Many brands of pipe sealant contain oils, solvents or carriers that can damage plastic. A proper sealant must be certified by the manufacturer to be harmless to the fitting material and to not contaminate fluid in the pipe.
Finally, a sealing compound must not lubricate the joint to the point that over-tightening is encouraged. Several sealants on the market meet all these requirements.
https://www.lascofittings.com/threads
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,405 Posts
Really? You're going to try to bodge a fix? When a leak means that gasoline will spray on a hot engine? That you have between your legs? Brave man!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Great comment and perhaps well deserved.

My thoughts are:

1. The BMW fuel pump assembly is poorly designed and poorly made as shown by the 50,000+ recall and all the owners suffering the fuel leak.

2. The BMW plastic quick disconnect is poorly designed and poorly made for over a decade causing owners to suffer fuel leaks -- and BMW still has not bother to fix it.

I don't want to ride on and depend on a bike with those two known defects ready to strike at any time. Making a reliable safe fuel delivery is not a difficult task. Other manufacturers have been doing it for over a 100 years. My guess is that a good cement and brass fitting are far less likely to fail than these BMW plastic pieces.

I wonder if BMW riding gear is fire-proof -- maybe it should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Gas leak fixed for $6

Repair and recommendation

BMW called me back and said they would only consider if they would warranty this if I took the bike to a BMW dealer and had the dealer disassemble and examine the problem. I bet that the likely outcome would be me being charged around $900 and still have a fuel pump assemble little or no better than the original badly designed one.

Therefore, because my leak appeared at the threads, I cleaned both pipe threads w/acetone and tooth brush and cleaned area surrounding and applied JB Weld to both parts and then tightened little more than finger-tight.
I also surrounded the pipe thread boss with 2 thick layers of JB Weld to add strength.
The problem is solved, no gas spraying on the engine and I’m sure it is now safer and less likely to leak than if I bought a new poorly-design BMW pump assembly,

I’d recommend strengthening that area w/JB weld for anyone if their tank is removed

Installation notes:
Upon close examination, the rubber gasket was cracked (ordered one from local dealer, Eurosport, at 4PM and they shipped it that same day).
Cleaned corroded rim of tank lower opening with scotch pad
Wiped any dust/debris from inside of tank with tack rag
Note alignment of pump assembly - it can only attach one way
Drew fuel tank assembly and gasket into tank slowly with bolts.
I’ll quote another post “Hardest part is making sure the hose lays back down in the Styrofoam holder on the way back down.” To do this, I had to use my favorite flashlight for tight spaces (Braun Slim Bar Folding LED) to check the hose routing. I had to run the fuel hose to rear of pump wires.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Love the cartoon.

I'll assume it's referencing what BMW wanted to accomplish vs what they created that caused so many fuel leaks and the big recall for defective fuel pump assemblies.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top