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Well you could measure air gap after you loosen the fork cap and compress the fork, then remove the bottom bolt, clean everything up and reassemble to the same air gap (with the spring in). I don't have any of these issues with the BMW ubertool, but I don't want to rub it in.
 

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Well you could measure air gap after you loosen the fork cap and compress the fork, then remove the bottom bolt, clean everything up and reassemble to the same air gap (with the spring in). I don't have any of these issues with the BMW ubertool, but I don't want to rub it in.
Thank you. I had already started to drain the oil on one but I'll open the second this morning to see if I can get an accurate measure of what's in there. How do you handle teh damping rod or is there a BMW tool for that as well?
 

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The last set I did was a month or so ago, I don't remember any issues, no special tool for the damping rod. Have to pay more attention on the next set.
 

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Well, thank you to all the contributors to this great thread that got me through the disassembly, oil change and re-assembly with great success. And, first time ever inside a set of fork tubes so I am pretty pleased getting through the job. and no leftover parts. They're actually pretty intuitive once you're in there and see what's what.

For posterity and future visitors this is the spacer mod I employed that was mentioned a few pages back. It was the simplest and best solution for me in using the Race Tech compressor making that a very viable tool for the job if you don't have the authentic BMW tool.

New set of higher holes, drilled in place before disassembly, with the stubbiest step drill I had after a small pilot hole was drilled. And the relationship to the original holes.
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On the rack, fully compressed and it takes a slight pull up to get something under the nut
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I used a slightly modified door panel pry tool that was perfect for this job. And all the pieces are out except for the second friction sleeve that I left in place while draining. That one happened to fall out.
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The last area of contention was the damper rod assy on reassembly. I know folks mentioned a thread on tool which would be ideal but there were no M13 by whatever inside thread things to be found so I experimented with come clear PVC tubing. This worked fine for purging air when pouring oil but failed a couple times when pulling up for that last little bit to get my tool under the nut. I got a couple fingers on the first one so that worked out fine. The second one I added a zip tie and while better also separated in that last higher tension pull so I did the same trick. If I ever do this again I might try a small hose clamp for better bite. Or just add a nut or two to my next parts order and rig a rod.
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But, with a couple improvised tools and techniques this job was far easier that I would have expected. And kudos to all that mentioned the '10 click' test for proper placement of the cap assembly. That is something I would have very easily blown past and regretted later.

And they're now installed on my 2015 R nineT!
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Awesome that it worked out well. Come back and tell us what you think after you've had a ride.
As requested, forks were successfully installed and these were my initial impressions, noting that I am aware this is NOT the intended use for these on the R nineT vs the S1000RR so my expectations are realistic and my needs are minimal.

The very first thing was that the seems significantly stiffer than the stock non-adjustable version, which is to be expected. But I mean significantly. I read a lot of folk saying that these forks were soft from teh factory but that's in not my initial experience especially at my weight. Preload two lines showing, no compression or rebound damping dialed in it was a pretty physical task in manually compressing the forks to check the amount of bounce and return speed as I have seen in videos. I could get nowhere near the bottom as I could with the originals. So instead of looking at lines I counted preload turns. Came in 10 full from all the way out and that was again around 2 lines showing. 3 clicks from out on the compression and rebound damping. A quick zip tie check had me at 15mm of rider sag. Manual says 10-15 so I am good there. I am no lightweight at around 250# and a quick shake out ride had the biggest zip tie moved right in the middle of the available rangs which as I understand it is where I want to be.

Fresh BMW fork oil may have things a bit tight as well but the ride did seem more supple and less jarring. And less noticible front end diving on breaking. All positive results for me. I'd expect this may actually relax a bit with use. I'll now continue to monitor and play with things but really I don't think I'll appreciate the extent of the change at the front until I install the Nitron R1 shock I have on order which will hopefully smooth the rear out as well. Time will tell.

My current challenge is understanding or feeling the changes that come with the compression and rebound damping settings. They're new for me.
 

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Most importantly you have the sag in range. Check it again when you install the rear shock, then just ride and enjoy. Once you're used to it, then make simple changes and see what effect they have. As you said, minimal needs so they may just be fine as is.
 
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