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I am familiar with the $1300 Ohlins cartridge kits and we have the tools to work on them. Thanks for the suggestion, but not super relevant to the discussion.

Sorry, you must have missed my first comment......I can tell you when I was changing to Ohlins cartridges I did it without any special tools.

Which was relevant, I was trying to tell you it can be done without fabbing anything, but I guess you missed that. I followed up with a suggestion to not bother, because it seems like you were after simplicity, and I am of the opinion you'll never be able to enjoy that with the OEM Sachs internals.

No spring compressor needed with the Ohlins, 19mm wrench, 14mm wrench, 3mm a few other common tools, and since you already have the specific Ohlins stuff, I don't understand why you'd want to keep the OEM stuff, unless you're racing in a restricted class.

BTW.....you can get those cartridges a lot cheaper (new) if you look around.
AND @blachow has a near new set with 3 spring rates for sale now in the forum classifieds, who knows maybe he's negotiable on price, even though it's a decent price he's priced it.

0:)
 

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I'm changing my fork springs and oil on a 2014 HP4 at the moment.

For the left leg, I've made up a tool similar to what BMW use. I bought a 1-1/4" PVC pipe joiner from Home Depot, as well as a reducer that fits inside the joiner. I cut the reducer at an angle with a hacksaw, so that it effectively makes a "thread" so you can treat the joiner as a nut that will screw down on the spring as if it is a bolt. I had to do redo this as the first one I cut in the wrong direction. Make sure you cut at the same angle and direction as the way the spring spirals.

Put a pair of holes at the top of the union for your spring compressor.

Then cut the union in half and use PVC pipe primer and glue to glue the "threads" into the pipe joiner halves. Clamp the plastic together - PVC glue is designed to work where this is a friction fit. Leave it a full 24hrs to cure.

Put the two halves around the spring, I used a zip-tie to hold it on, then the race-tech compressor to crank down on the spring. The union will slide inside the tube so you get plenty of room.

If you don't want to drill another set of holes in the right leg spacer, you can make a right leg tool as well. Same concept, you just glue two round pieces inside the union that fit in the spacer holes. That will give you an extra 1-1/2" compression which is all you need. PVC is plenty strong enough and it won't scratch anything.

I'll post some pictures to make it clearer.
 

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Well my cunning and devious plan did not work out so good - BMW why did you make this so hard....:frown2:

I have a Racetech spring compressor. The "jaws" that go either side of the spring/spacer are not wide enough to allow a PVC fitting (or anything strong enough really) between them and the spring or spacer. Other compressors might have more room - I don't know.

Reluctantly I had to give in and take the removed forks and my Wilbur springs to the local dealership for them to complete the removal, clean, add fresh oil, new springs and seal them up. It wasn't a lot of money ($200) but a bit annoying. The real BMW compressor and inserts is currently Euro 475 (about USD$490 + $30 shipping). I guess that is only 3 fork services - if you are going to be riding DDC bikes for the next 3yrs or more it might be worth it. If you are handy with a welder and a mill you could make equivalents.

Also, the spec for the fork oil has been updated. The original was 7.5wt but now all DDC forks are using 11.5wt (odd ball I know).
Dealer tech showed me this on their system. I went with the 11.5wt instead of the 10wt I was going to use.
 

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Thank you to the OP and the follow-up posters.

Using this thread, I just finished changing the fork oil on my 2010. The bike has just under 20k miles and the previous owner did not give me any service records.

Without this thread I never would have known about the "10-clicks and only 10" business, and my damping adjusters would have been mis-adjusted.

Fork oil looked new, was clear and was not at all stinky (smelled just like the stuff that came out of the Maxima bottle), so it had probably been changed recently.

But hey, now I know for sure it is done, and I know who did it.

Valve adjust one weekend soon... :)
 

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Preparing for this at the moment.

Bought the RaceTech compressor. Now just gathering information.

Mailed Dave Moss, he recommends a deviation from BMW advise regarding air chamber and oil weight:


For 2012 BMW S1000RR
10w Motul oil, air gap 90mm

Shock oil service was due at 10-12,000kms for a track bike, preferably 8,000kms for fast riding. Please get the rear shock serviced.


My bike has 17.000km's.
 

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I'm changing my fork springs and oil on a 2014 HP4 at the moment.

For the left leg, I've made up a tool similar to what BMW use. I bought a 1-1/4" PVC pipe joiner from Home Depot, as well as a reducer that fits inside the joiner. I cut the reducer at an angle with a hacksaw, so that it effectively makes a "thread" so you can treat the joiner as a nut that will screw down on the spring as if it is a bolt. I had to do redo this as the first one I cut in the wrong direction. Make sure you cut at the same angle and direction as the way the spring spirals.

Put a pair of holes at the top of the union for your spring compressor.

Then cut the union in half and use PVC pipe primer and glue to glue the "threads" into the pipe joiner halves. Clamp the plastic together - PVC glue is designed to work where this is a friction fit. Leave it a full 24hrs to cure.

Put the two halves around the spring, I used a zip-tie to hold it on, then the race-tech compressor to crank down on the spring. The union will slide inside the tube so you get plenty of room.

If you don't want to drill another set of holes in the right leg spacer, you can make a right leg tool as well. Same concept, you just glue two round pieces inside the union that fit in the spacer holes. That will give you an extra 1-1/2" compression which is all you need. PVC is plenty strong enough and it won't scratch anything.

I'll post some pictures to make it clearer.

From the grave...Where dah pics at - Bruh???
 

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Continued:
Raise the upper fork tube and start threading it on the top cap.


Be careful not to pinch or kink the rubber O-ring when tightening the top cap down on the fork tube.


Now that the fork is all buttoned up, check it for smooth compression and rebound by holding the fork firmly on the floor and push down on the top tube as the bike would do under braking. If it feels good and does not bottom out on the brake caliper mounts, it’s time to reinstall the fork on your bike. The torque setting for the triple tree bolts is 19Nm. Once the fork is installed in the triple tree, be sure to torque the top cap to 20Nm too!

Now it’s time to repeat this procedure for the other fork!

Time wise for each fork, it took me about 45 minutes from removing the fork from the bike, draining the oil, disassembly, refilling, measuring, reassembly of internals, checking rebound settings and tightening the top cap back on the upper tube. Keep in mind, this was my first time, so experience will certainly reduce the time it takes to change the fluid next time.

Good luck!
thank you! any chance to load the pictures again please?

Also, anyone know where to buy the compression tool in Europe? And the fork seal driver tool for 2010 S1000rr - what diameter we need? Is this suitable https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V1X5WVC/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=AT7B7UCUVYVLX&psc=1 (I also have a Triumph Street Triple and ideally would buy the set that fits as many as posible bikes, but to a minimum these 2 I have now)
 

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Discussion Starter #51 (Edited)
thank you! any chance to load the pictures again please?

Also, anyone know where to buy the compression tool in Europe? And the fork seal driver tool for 2010 S1000rr - what diameter we need? Is this suitable https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V1X5WVC/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=AT7B7UCUVYVLX&psc=1 (I also have a Triumph Street Triple and ideally would buy the set that fits as many as posible bikes, but to a minimum these 2 I have now)
UPDATE: 10/9/2017: Photobucket is the host of the images embedded links of the photos I took of the fork oil change, however, Photobucket is now requiring account holders to pay and annual fee to allow the photo links to be embedded into third party websites, such as this S1000RR forum. I'm not paying any fee and will try to find a different host to put the photos. Until then, all the photos in the below description will be null. Sorry for the hassle!
 

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UPDATE: 10/9/2017: Photobucket is the host of the images embedded links of the photos I took of the fork oil change, however, Photobucket is now requiring account holders to pay and annual fee to allow the photo links to be embedded into third party websites, such as this S1000RR forum. I'm not paying any fee and will try to find a different host to put the photos. Until then, all the photos in the below description will be null. Sorry for the hassle!
Thank you.

I looked later at the pictures' host and saw it is photobucket. They did the same to me, so I switched to Amazon (when I had Prime) and later to Onedrive. I will have to look into dropbox and google drive, they might be a good alternative too.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
UPDATE 10/10/17: It'll be too time consuming for me to try to find another host to upload the photos and embed the link within the DIY thread I created so, here's a link to the album showing all photos I took during the procedure: https://photos.app.goo.gl/YKYms1CJFu3sUxXW2.

Not the best solution but it's all I have time to get photos out there to see.
 

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UPDATE 10/10/17: It'll be too time consuming for me to try to find another host to upload the photos and embed the link within the DIY thread I created so, here's a link to the album showing all photos I took during the procedure: https://photos.app.goo.gl/YKYms1CJFu3sUxXW2.

Not the best solution but it's all I have time to get photos out there to see.
Thank you! it works! I will have 2 tabs opened and will follow the text DIY with the pictures' folder on the other tab.

I am thinking what would the safest way to put the front in the air (and keep it while I take the forks out). I see the hydraulic jack you used to raise the bike, did you leave it on the jack? What is the jacking point please, I can't see this from the pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Thank you! it works! I will have 2 tabs opened and will follow the text DIY with the pictures' folder on the other tab.

I am thinking what would the safest way to put the front in the air (and keep it while I take the forks out). I see the hydraulic jack you used to raise the bike, did you leave it on the jack? What is the jacking point please, I can't see this from the pics.
The jack was under the exhaust headers at the curve going towards the cat. I used a block of wood to make it more stable and level, but the bike was still a bit wobbly. I now used jack stands under the frame sliders to keep the front up in the air and and it's much more stable. Good luck!
 

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An update, we found if you do drill another set of holes on the black plastic bushing higher up than the stock '15+ ones (at the very top, basically), you can use the RaceTech compressor to get the spring off and on.


Hi Lane, and all, I have a 2015 and have drilled holes at the top of the plastic bush etc. But I'm having difficulty with reassembly. I have a Racetech spring compressor. When I compress the spring until the fork leg body touches the top clamps of the Racetech compressor, The damper rod can almost be pulled up using long nose pliers, but not enough to access the square section used to hold the rod while tightening the fork cap.

Did you have this problem? I think the BMW jaws give an extra inch of spring compression before the fork body touches the top clamp under on the compressor.

Does anyone reading this know if the BMW jaws/ "Extensions" (83302336777) work with the Racetech spring compressor?

Can anyone advise what I maybe doing wrong? My set-up does not seem to compress the black bush far enough before the fork body touches the underside of the Racetech compressor top jaws, which I describe as maximum possible compression with the setup I have.

My bike is in bits, your help will be appreciated!
 

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Here are the pictures from the service manual for the BMW Compressor and extensions.
I would guess - maybe, the extensions look like they might fit on the racetech but it depends on the threads. They are pretty thin (I've seen them at the dealer).




As you can see here, the spacer is 100% in the fork leg when compressed. I tried drilling the holes and had exactly the same issue you have.
I have the cartridge pull rod from Traxxion (basically a rod with a threaded hole so you can screw it on to pull the cartridge rod up).
The top out springs in the stock carts make it impossible to get the damn nut high enough to reach.


I'm going to make my own equivalent of the racetech for my next service, with these extension points welded to the 'C' clamp. The racetech C is actually a bit narrow to fit anything like the extensions.
 

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Your mileage may vary...
I'm not recommending my method, just advising what I ended up doing...
The Left fork left was easy, I used the Racetech spring compressor on the exposed spring to make room for tools to undo the locknut. Re-assembly was not a problem either. I was able to set the oil level without the spring as per the factory method.
The right DDC fork leg with the pre-load adjuster was a challenge. I had to deviate from the recommended method.
I carefully drilled 5.5mm holes at the top edge of the black plastic spacer, allowing the use of the Racetech compressor to dis-assemble the fork.
While compressed I was able to undo the lock-nut and remove the cap, but when it came free and the damper rod disappeared (The rebound spring is under a bit of tension) I thought crap, this will be a toughie to put back together. Sure enough...
I tried REALLY HARD to follow the BMW service guide. With my setup I could set the oil level, then try and compress the spring enough to reach the top of the damper rod with long nose pliers and pull it up. I definitely had to compress the rebound spring, but could not get the rod up enough to get a spanner onto the square section of the damper rod. I ended up leaving tool marks on the end of the damper rod so I DONT recommend you try pulling the damper rod with pliers.
When following the service guide procedure, I measured 580mls of fork oil, filled the forks. When I dipped to check the level it was spot-on.
I decided to assemble the damper rod assembly outside the fork and add the oil after installing the complete damper rod assembly.
Its a little intimidating compressing the damper in the Racetech setup out of the forkleg. First time I used a piece of PVC as a sleeve but repeated the process without it. I screwed the damper bolt into the bottom of the damper, which located nicely on the bottom mount of the compressor.
There is a bit of "fishing" required to ensure you get the assemebled damper rod seated properly in the bottom of the fork leg, but it only took a moment to feel the rod notch into the recess.
The final note I'd make is clean and inspect the damper rod bolt and washer, the washer has a rubber seal that should be clean for reassembly.
I was intimidated by this job before I started but am happy with this process and will be confident when I go back from 11.5 weight to 7.5 weight oil.
 

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Good luck!
I finally started process. Straight away I see that BMW RSD manual tells to remove side fairing only, while you seem to have removed the front too. Also you left the bottom, BMW tells me to remove the bottom.

I tried their way, but it makes no sense - the whole point of the exercise IMHO was to get access to bolts holding the fork, the BMW way just does not give any more access then before I removed the side cover.

Having said that, I realize that I can reach those 2+2 bolts on each side holding the fork with a Torx T45 bit. Anyone can confirm this please?
 

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I've taken the forks off with the front bodywork on the bike many times. You just need access to get at the bolts, which is why they say side fairing should be removed.
 
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