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Discussion Starter #1
I have a ‘15 S1KRR premium with 3K miles. Just had my first Track Day, loved it and want to dive in the hobby.

My main question: Will the computerized aids of the S1krr Rob me of becoming a “truly” advanced pace rider? Or if I turn the settings down to the minimum will it not matter.

Hopefully this makes sense. Trying to decide between making my bike solely a track bike or selling it and getting a ‘06-12 R6 with Ohlins and a quickshifter. Thanks!
 

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I have a ‘15 S1KRR premium with 3K miles. Just had my first Track Day, loved it and want to dive in the hobby.

My main question: Will the computerized aids of the S1krr Rob me of becoming a “truly” advanced pace rider? Or if I turn the settings down to the minimum will it not matter.

Hopefully this makes sense. Trying to decide between making my bike solely a track bike or selling it and getting a ‘06-12 R6 with Ohlins and a quickshifter. Thanks!
If, then, I would get a "new" (2017...) R6 which has traction control.
It will save you a lot of money, and it will save your bones.

Electronics will not rob you anything.

Only your natural delusions will rob you:
More throttle will not make you faster. Etc.

I would keep s1k, because you can use (RCK/)DTC settings to down tune the s1k performance, and make it feel like it is an R6.
But you can not up-tune a R6 to make it feel like s1k.
 

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I have a ‘15 S1KRR premium with 3K miles. Just had my first Track Day, loved it and want to dive in the hobby.

My main question: Will the computerized aids of the S1krr Rob me of becoming a “truly” advanced pace rider? Or if I turn the settings down to the minimum will it not matter.

Hopefully this makes sense. Trying to decide between making my bike solely a track bike or selling it and getting a ‘06-12 R6 with Ohlins and a quickshifter. Thanks!
simple formula:

- keep s1krr

- invest time and moneys into coaching and practice

forget about ohlins until you're able to be 10-20% of fast group.
 

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forget about ohlins until you're able to be 10-20% of fast group.
It does not matter how fast you are. It is always a good thing to upgrade suspension to track suspension, if you are going to ride majority of your time on track.
Street suspension is for street riding.
Track suspension is for track riding.
Too simple?
(I have been riding track only since 2007 or so...)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
simple formula:

- keep s1krr

- invest time and moneys into coaching and practice

forget about ohlins until you're able to be 10-20% of fast group.
I appreciate the advice. What kind of cost do you see for coaching? Also any recommendations for picking a coach and do they normally do this during open track days?
 

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My first ever track day I did 2:30 laps. A Year and a half later I do 2:00. The super fast people do 1:50. All you need is seat time on the track. THERE IS NO SILVER BULLET TO GOING FAST.
 

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It does not matter how fast you are. It is always a good thing to upgrade suspension to track suspension, if you are going to ride majority of your time on track.
Street suspension is for street riding.
Track suspension is for track riding.
Too simple?
(I have been riding track only since 2007 or so...)
Good for you.

BMW S1000RR is not equipped with street suspension.
 

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Good for you.

BMW S1000RR is not equipped with street suspension.
wtf are you talking about? did the OP say he had track suspension already? i must have missed that. because every bike that is street legal comes from factory with street suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My first ever track day I did 2:30 laps. A Year and a half later I do 2:00. The super fast people do 1:50. All you need is seat time on the track. THERE IS NO SILVER BULLET TO GOING FAST.
For sure. I realize it’ll take a couple years and mannny of days there to get quick. just trying to plan ahead, I don’t want to spend 2 years getting “fast” and then upgrade to a bike with traditional suspension to chase that top 20% of the pack and then be struggling because I have “holes” in my ability/feel from riding the electronic suspension for 2 years. I’m sure I am over thinking this as well.
 

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I appreciate the advice. What kind of cost do you see for coaching? Also any recommendations for picking a coach and do they normally do this during open track days?
There is no golden rule here.

If you're completely new to the track, it makes sense to take courses like CSS.

After that, in EU/UK every trackday will have someone available for coaching. Usually they are ex BSB/WSBK riders with very good knowledge of a local track.
My rule of thumb if I'm new to the track I usually take tuition for few sessions to learn the lines.

If you're really serious, it makes sense to research and find a similar rider that offers 1-on-1 sessions. It will be more expensive, but you will learn quicker.
 

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Good luck making BSB Superstock times on UK tracks.

I appreciate you have a lot of experience, but I would be careful with such generic statements.
Good luck, oh, wait, what?? Making BSB Superstock times on UK tracks??
BSB Superstock does not have OEM street bike suspension??
LOL....

BSB STK rules:

5.2.7.10.1Front ForksForks (stanchions, stem, wheel spindle, upper and lower crown, etc.) mustremain as originally produced by the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.The upper and lower fork clamps (triple clamp, fork bridges) must remain as originally produced by the manufacturer on the homologated motorcycle.A steering damper may be added or replaced with an after-market damper.The steering damper cannot act as a steering lock limiting device.Fork caps on the mechanical forks may only be modified or replaced to allowexternal adjustment. (This does not include the mechanical fork leg that is part of the homologated electronic fork set). Dust seals may be modified, changed or removed if the fork remains totallyoil-sealed.MECHANICAL FORKS: Original internal parts of the homologated forks maybe modified or changed. After market damper kits or valves may be installed.The original surface finish of the fork tubes (stanchions, fork pipes) may be changed. Additional surface treatments are allowed.ELECTRONIC SUSPENSION: No aftermarket or prototype electronicallycontrolled suspension parts may be used. Electronic suspension may be used if such suspension is already present on the production model of thehomologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (allmechanical and electronic parts must remain as homologated) with theexception of shims and springs. The original suspension system must worksafely in the event of an electronic failure. The electronic front suspension may be replaced with a mechanical system from a similar homologated model from the same manufacturer.

5.2.7.10.3Rear Suspension UnitRear suspension unit (shock absorber) may be modified or replaced, butthe original attachments to the frame and rear fork (swing arm) must be as homologated.All the rear suspension linkage parts must remain as originally producedby the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.MECHANICAL SUSPENSION: Rear suspension unit and spring may be changed.ELECTRONIC SUSPENSION: No aftermarket or prototype electronicallycontrolled suspension parts may be used. Electronic suspension may be used if such suspension is already present on the production model of thehomologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (allmechanical and electronic parts must remain as homologated) with theexception of shims and springs). The original suspension system must work properly safely in the event of an electronic failure. The electronic shock absorber can be replaced with a mechanical one.
 

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Having ridden both bikes. R6 has been amazing. RR is a tank compared to my 17 R6.

R6 is still on stock suspension as it works for my weight. Don't buy into the hype that you need aftermarket suspension. As long as springs match your weight and your riding style, and suspension is dialed in.

I'm faster on R6 than R1 or RR by a good margin. Nothing beats the feeling of passing full modded liter bikes with my R6. I'm now a firm believer in middle size bikes for track. Cannot wait for the new 765 to come out next year.

Aside from better handling and agility, R6 needs 6 track days to wear a rear slick, and 5gal of gas a day (plus full tank in bike). Took 2 days to wear a rear tire on a liter bike, twice as much fuel. A liter bikes makes more sense on the street IMO. The only downside to R6 on track is having to shift more, and on the straights I get killed by big bikes, but make up for it in the corners.

There are some sweet deals on new 17 R6 if you shop around. Plan to spend $3-4k on track prep (fairings, ABS removal, steel brake lines, flash, full system, brake pads, clipons, rearsets, auto blipper, etc...).
 

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Good luck, oh, wait, what?? Making BSB Superstock times on UK tracks??
BSB Superstock does not have OEM street bike suspension??
LOL....

BSB STK rules:

5.2.7.10.1Front ForksForks (stanchions, stem, wheel spindle, upper and lower crown, etc.) mustremain as originally produced by the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.The upper and lower fork clamps (triple clamp, fork bridges) must remain as originally produced by the manufacturer on the homologated motorcycle.A steering damper may be added or replaced with an after-market damper.The steering damper cannot act as a steering lock limiting device.Fork caps on the mechanical forks may only be modified or replaced to allowexternal adjustment. (This does not include the mechanical fork leg that is part of the homologated electronic fork set). Dust seals may be modified, changed or removed if the fork remains totallyoil-sealed.MECHANICAL FORKS: Original internal parts of the homologated forks maybe modified or changed. After market damper kits or valves may be installed.The original surface finish of the fork tubes (stanchions, fork pipes) may be changed. Additional surface treatments are allowed.ELECTRONIC SUSPENSION: No aftermarket or prototype electronicallycontrolled suspension parts may be used. Electronic suspension may be used if such suspension is already present on the production model of thehomologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (allmechanical and electronic parts must remain as homologated) with theexception of shims and springs. The original suspension system must worksafely in the event of an electronic failure. The electronic front suspension may be replaced with a mechanical system from a similar homologated model from the same manufacturer.

5.2.7.10.3Rear Suspension UnitRear suspension unit (shock absorber) may be modified or replaced, butthe original attachments to the frame and rear fork (swing arm) must be as homologated.All the rear suspension linkage parts must remain as originally producedby the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.MECHANICAL SUSPENSION: Rear suspension unit and spring may be changed.ELECTRONIC SUSPENSION: No aftermarket or prototype electronicallycontrolled suspension parts may be used. Electronic suspension may be used if such suspension is already present on the production model of thehomologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (allmechanical and electronic parts must remain as homologated) with theexception of shims and springs). The original suspension system must work properly safely in the event of an electronic failure. The electronic shock absorber can be replaced with a mechanical one.
Why did you highlight Mechanical Forks ?

The guy has 2015 model, it comes with Electronic Suspension.
 

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Having ridden both bikes. R6 has been amazing. RR is a tank compared to my 17 R6.

R6 is still on stock suspension as it works for my weight. Don't buy into the hype that you need aftermarket suspension. As long as springs match your weight and your riding style, and suspension is dialed in.

I'm faster on R6 than R1 or RR by a good margin. Nothing beats the feeling of passing full modded liter bikes with my R6. I'm now a firm believer in middle size bikes for track. Cannot wait for the new 765 to come out next year.

Aside from better handling and agility, R6 needs 6 track days to wear a rear slick, and 5gal of gas a day (plus full tank in bike). Took 2 days to wear a rear tire on a liter bike, twice as much fuel. A liter bikes makes more sense on the street IMO. The only downside to R6 on track is having to shift more, and on the straights I get killed by big bikes, but make up for it in the corners.
RR is not a tank compared to 17 R6. It is only your vivid imagination. Compare the numbers.

I'm faster with a old (2011) s1k than with a new (2017+) R6. Typical difference between 600cc and 1000cc for any rider is about 2 seconds. The only reason why zoo is faster with R6 is that he was total newbie when he was riding s1k.
But, yeah, one thing is also that R6 has better suspension (more track oriented) than a s1k...

It takes 5-7 track days to wear down a rear with a s1k with a track suspension. The OEM s1k rear shock will eat rear tyres for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
 

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RR is not a tank compared to 17 R6. It is only your vivid imagination. Compare the numbers.

It takes 5-7 track days to wear down a rear with a s1k with a track suspension. The OEM s1k rear shock will eat rear tyres for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
It's true I have come a long way since owning the RR. But even compared to R1, R6 is more nimble. I have an Ohlins GP 2 shock on R1, still eats a rear tire in 2 days. Same with friends on RR with aftermarket shocks and similar pace, two days for a rear. Can get 3 days out if it if it's flipped.

17+ R6 has the same front (brakes and suspension) as 15+ R1. It's more flickable than any liter bike I have ridden. Maybe because it's a track bike and removing street parts (lights, ABS, etc...) made it a good bit lighter.

Finally, I switched to Pirellis on R6 (before was on Michelins CUP Evos on R1 and RR), and 180/60 in the rear. It provides so much grip, allows bike to tip in like it's on rails. Unless the new RR can match R6's agility, I won't be going to a liter bike on the track.
 
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