BMW S1000RR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
bought (by mistake) an endless chain. So I must cut it and install with a master link (if I understand correctly from all the videos I watched so far).

My bike is 2010 (117 links required?), so do I need to cut off 2 links, add a master link? 118-2+1=117?

What master link goes well with our bikes and this chain please?

It will be my first chain change, as it can be seen from the questions :grin2:

UPDATE: this is the chain I bought:

https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00UL9BRB6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

So I guess the correct link will be something like this?:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DID-525-ZVM-X-Gold-Rivet-Type-Connecting-Master-Chain-Link/362130041724?epid=11007038380&hash=item5450a1eb7c:g:TBoAAOSw2xRYmZqx
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,341 Posts
Yes 117 links is what you need. Yes cut 2 off then use the rivet link to make it 117. When you cut your old chain. Lay it down on a bench flat. Put your new one along side it. Then you can work it out to be 100% correct and not cut it short. Do you have the tools required to cut the old chain and then also press the rivet link together and then peen the ends?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
Buy the DID chain rivet tool. Best one I have used.

DID chain you got is a good one, get two X-ring master links (one as backup in case you mess up given it's your first time).

Cut your old chain, put along side your new one, remove links from new as needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
I bought a chinese knockoff of the DID rivet tool from fleabay, cheaper and did the job but I had to modify it a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yes 117 links is what you need. Yes cut 2 off then use the rivet link to make it 117. When you cut your old chain. Lay it down on a bench flat. Put your new one along side it. Then you can work it out to be 100% correct and not cut it short. Do you have the tools required to cut the old chain and then also press the rivet link together and then peen the ends?
Buy the DID chain rivet tool. Best one I have used.

DID chain you got is a good one, get two X-ring master links (one as backup in case you mess up given it's your first time).

Cut your old chain, put along side your new one, remove links from new as needed.
I bought a chinese knockoff of the DID rivet tool from fleabay, cheaper and did the job but I had to modify it a bit.
Thank you all for replies!

I bought the genuine (I hope) DID tool - it cost $90, better be genuine :D

I noticed that ALL the rivets on the new chain are square, like on the old Regina chain I have on the bike now. Couldn't find the master link as all rivets on the NEW chain looks identical. Where do I cut the new chain then?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,341 Posts
Cut the new chain anywhere. It doesn't matter.

You may run into a problem with that DID tool. The DID tool will press the link together and for peening it normally uses a mushroom type arrangement. It pushes a cylinder into the hollow pin and flares it out. The square type links require you to use a different tool. Its like a drift with a cut out. You hit it with a hammer like a punch and it peens top and bottom. Then you rotate it 90 degrees and it does left and right. Giving you that square look. Peen'd over on 4 sides.

BMW Chain tool. You can see the little half moon cut out. This is either a press type arrangement where you wind it in. Or some are like a punch and you just hit it with a hammer.


DID chain tool instructions:
http://www.didchain.com/PDF/DID Chain Tool Inst_150.pdf

DID Link with hollow pins uses a flare DID tool


Square link uses a punch with a cutout to peen 4 sides
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
Best thing to do is use an angle grinder to get the top bits of the peened part off, then press it thru using the rivet tool. Then once you have it in a single strand you'll be able to work out the best place to cut a whole link out, again by carefully grinding off the peened over part. A Dremel will help here as it's more precise than an angle grinder

Sent by shoephone via Tapatoe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Cut the new chain anywhere. It doesn't matter.

You may run into a problem with that DID tool. The DID tool will press the link together and for peening it normally uses a mushroom type arrangement. It pushes a cylinder into the hollow pin and flares it out. The square type links require you to use a different tool. Its like a drift with a cut out. You hit it with a hammer like a punch and it peens top and bottom. Then you rotate it 90 degrees and it does left and right. Giving you that square look. Peen'd over on 4 sides.

BMW Chain tool. You can see the little half moon cut out. This is either a press type arrangement where you wind it in. Or some are like a punch and you just hit it with a hammer.


DID chain tool instructions:
http://www.didchain.com/PDF/DID Chain Tool Inst_150.pdf

DID Link with hollow pins uses a flare DID tool


Square link uses a punch with a cutout to peen 4 sides
I thought that a DID tool will work best on a DID chain...so I should have gotten a Motion Pro tool instead :( ?

https://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-08-0470-Chain-Breaker/dp/B0050HJNW4/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_img_9?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=YSAEXCND9X3A7VBJ37JD

Is there a problem if my chain with square rivet will have a master link with round flare? What are the risks? I thought it didn't matter how you rivet a pin as long as it stays in place... :frown2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Best thing to do is use an angle grinder to get the top bits of the peened part off, then press it thru using the rivet tool. Then once you have it in a single strand you'll be able to work out the best place to cut a whole link out, again by carefully grinding off the peened over part. A Dremel will help here as it's more precise than an angle grinder

Sent by shoephone via Tapatoe
The reviews mentioned (I saw it even on a DID video shot by their race engineer or something) that the pin should go even without grinding, but thank you for the dremel tip, as I was indeed reluctant on using the angle grinder on the bike...dremel tool should be easier to handle.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,341 Posts
Let me be more precise.

Your DID chain will have a DID link which should be the mushroom type. So the tool will work completely fine. Disregard what I said. That is for the square type but you should be fine. The DID tool will flare them out mushroom style. You want to make sure its done correctly because that is all that's holding the chain. The pic I posted above is how it should look when done properly. I also attached the full PDF instructions.

Some chain tools will press out the pins clean whether you grind or not. But its a lot easier and quicker to grind the heads flat on one side then push them out. I always use a angle grinder.

Be careful when you press the master link together. Do not over tighten or you will seize the link and it won't be able to flex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Let me more precise.

Your DID chain will have a DID link which should be the mushroom type. So the tool will work completely fine. Disregard what I said. That is for the square type but you should be fine. The DID tool will flare them out mushroom style. You want to make sure its done correctly because that is all that's holding the chain. The pic I posted above is how it should look when done properly. I also attached the full PDF instructions.

Some chain tools will press out the pins clean whether you grind or not. But its a lot easier and quicker to grind the heads flat on one side then push them out. I always use a angle grinder.

Be careful when you press the master link together. Do not over tighten or you will seize the link and it won't be able to flex.
thank you for this clarification! And for the .pdf!

not meaning to start another holly_war_thread, but would you choose Regina or DID chain on your bike? I went for DID chain and renthal sprockets front and rear, hope this is optimal.

On the master link, as I said, it will be my first time, but all the videos made clear that one should do a little and then check and again, in order not to over-tighten.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Don't forget to reset your swing arm adjustments with the appropriate chain sag as well, about 1" I believe. The new chain will stretch on the initial ride.

I had some issues this past weekend hammering the master link ends down, ended up doing new sprockets since the bike has 15k on it. Doesn't look great but it should hold, the o rings all appear the same gap.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
Some people like to complicate $hit.

With the DID tool, you don't have to hammer or grind anything. Follow the instructions, I have used it on different chain brands, it worked great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
thank you for this clarification! And for the .pdf!

not meaning to start another holly_war_thread, but would you choose Regina or DID chain on your bike? I went for DID chain and renthal sprockets front and rear, hope this is optimal.

On the master link, as I said, it will be my first time, but all the videos made clear that one should do a little and then check and again, in order not to over-tighten.
I went DID because my oem Regina carked it.
I went with JT steel sprockets.
Somewhere in the DID doco is a measurement of how much the pin should flare out (for each DID chain). Just measure with a set of calipers, and mark the master link with some nail polish so you can keep an eye on it after the first few rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Many thanks for all the replies!

I am looking now for a master link (or two) and will attempt the chain change as soon as the weather will be unfavorable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Many thanks for all the replies!

I am looking now for a master link (or two) and will attempt the chain change as soon as the weather will be unfavorable.
That shouldn't be that hard to find, be careful, measure the pin with a caliper that goes to 1/100 of a mm. Also it is easy to over mushroom the rivet and here is why.

When you measure the rivet do not measure it where it touches the link. It is more narrow closest to the link. The sharp edge of the caliper will want to go under the mushroom and give you a false reading <5.7mm. Use the thicker flat edge of the caliper to measure the rivet at the widest point.

The DID tool is supposed to get the rivet to 5.7mm. Once you get to >5.7 stop!

Watch this video it is by DID and it is in Japanese with English sub titles it is the best video I have found.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
That shouldn't be that hard to find, be careful, measure the pin with a caliper that goes to 1/100 of a mm. Also it is easy to over mushroom the rivet and here is why.



When you measure the rivet do not measure it where it touches the link. It is more narrow closest to the link. The sharp edge of the caliper will want to go under the mushroom and give you a false reading <5.7mm. Use the thicker flat edge of the caliper to measure the rivet at the widest point.



The DID tool is supposed to get the rivet to 5.7mm. Once you get to >5.7 stop!



Watch this video it is by DID and it is in Japanese with English sub titles it is the best video I have found.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkY3Kd8Zgz0
Wow, now I am really concerned if my cheap Topex caliper is up to the job.

Maybe I need to buy a good caliper first. Can you recommend any verified models and sources to buy a really good caliper please?

And many thanks for the previous post!

Sent from my LG-H930 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Wow, now I am really concerned if my cheap Topex caliper is up to the job.

Maybe I need to buy a good caliper first. Can you recommend any verified models and sources to buy a really good caliper please?

And many thanks for the previous post!

Sent from my LG-H930 using Tapatalk
any digital calipers that measure to 1/100 will do, they are all made kind of the same, closer to the tip of the caliper it has a knife edge as you get closer to the ruler it transitions to a flat edge. Measure with the flat edge, because the knife edge will give you a false low measurement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I started the dreaded job today - was postponing it for several months, as was a bit afraid of all the unknown, but today decided that I must do it :D

Straight away I ran into a problem.

Undoing the front pinion. The BMW instruction says to engage a low gear and apply the foot brake. I did put it into first, tried to reach (on the opposite side) the brake pedal, but the 32mm nut on the front pinion will not move. Have anyone succeeded in changing the front pinion? The thread is normal there (anticlock-wise for undoing, right?)?

Any tips on this please? I had the feeling the pinion moved with the rear wheel being braked - is this possible? I am afraid not to break anything in the engine / gearbox, phases etc...
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top