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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Yeah, support the bike so the suspension is fully extended and run the calibration from the TFT.

This is not how data logging software is wrote and expected to be used. You calibrate at whatever you have decided your sag is. Lets just use 30mm as a sag front and rear. That becomes your calibrated 'zero' point within the datalogging box. What then happens on the track is you have made a couple of test laps. You have corner exited turn 1 and you are looking for the data of rebound and compression. The calibration point will then show the rebound as a negative number. If you have full wheelie control on and the expected result of front tire off the ground XX amount of time, you will see this data as -1mm to -30mm and then a flat line for the XX amount of time the front tire was off the ground.

So now you can also look at lets say corner 2. Now you will corner exit but the front tire will never leave the ground and create a flat line, but, you want to know the bikes attitude of front up -15mm and rear squat at +20mm and you can clearly see this transition on the graph table as a positive and negative value of front and rear.

So do not calibrate at suspension fully extended to zero. You would never see the rebound correctly on the graphs.
 

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This is not how data logging software is wrote and expected to be used. You calibrate at whatever you have decided your sag is. Lets just use 30mm as a sag front and rear. That becomes your calibrated 'zero' point within the datalogging box. What then happens on the track is you have made a couple of test laps. You have corner exited turn 1 and you are looking for the data of rebound and compression. The calibration point will then show the rebound as a negative number. If you have full wheelie control on and the expected result of front tire off the ground XX amount of time, you will see this data as -1mm to -30mm and then a flat line for the XX amount of time the front tire was off the ground.

So now you can also look at lets say corner 2. Now you will corner exit but the front tire will never leave the ground and create a flat line, but, you want to know the bikes attitude of front up -15mm and rear squat at +20mm and you can clearly see this transition on the graph table as a positive and negative value of front and rear.

So do not calibrate at suspension fully extended to zero. You would never see the rebound correctly on the graphs.
I think we were addressing two seperate things. I was only addressing calibrating the DDC. Now, if all I were doing is data logging with aftermarket suspension then yeah I think it's dealers choice and 0 at rider sag makes sense.

I agree with you from the perspective of making data easier to decipher. To calibrate the DDC though the bike needs to be at full extension, that's the instruction BMW provides. That's the only reference point the ECU has to calibrate from. If you're at say Front sag of 40m and rear at 35mm the bike doesn't know that unless it has a 0 reference point to start with. The suspact geometry software seems to back this up, 0mm is full extension with sag being positive numbers. There's no negative numbers to work with. I've never heard of suspension tuners working with negative numbers as an industry standard.

I'll know more when I start working with the 2d software. Hopefully I can set two lines on the graph for the sag baseline front and rear so I can see when and where the suspension is extended or compressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
The calibration of the OEM method with DDC rear sensor or even with front 2D sensor added is to set the bike on the rear stand as preferred method and do the CALIB. If no rear stand is available you can do the calibration on the side stand, but, I have tested this and there is a 1-2mm difference in the calibration of using a rear stand vs side stand.
 

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The calibration of the OEM method with DDC rear sensor or even with front 2D sensor added is to set the bike on the rear stand as preferred method and do the CALIB. If no rear stand is available you can do the calibration on the side stand, but, I have tested this and there is a 1-2mm difference in the calibration of using a rear stand vs side stand.
You're right. I just re-read the manual. I think I interpreted the manual and took it a step further in assuming setting at full extension would be better. Learn something new every day. I guess it makes more sense. The average consumer isn't going to have race stands. I'll be re calibrating my suspension today. :)
 

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On a separate note. I found that my 2D sensor didn't have the right install placement as a kit. Turns out Alpha didn't include a necessary extension when it was sent to HHR (Hustle Hard Racing USA distributor). If you have issues with fitment ensure you have this extension. The other option would be to use a 55mm clamp to the fork tube so you can place upper mount at the height you need on the fork.
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So I thought it might be best to do a thread on this 2D sensor install because this is the unofficial carry over install from the K46. It failed, and it worked. Do I recommend others to try this? No, not really unless you are very handy with drilling and tapping holes in a very nice new front fork.

The upper bracket will work on the fork tube. I tried in the same mounting method as you would have instructions for with 2D Racing sensor install. The lower bracket would not fit the brake caliper mounting point at all. So I had to come up with a mounting the quickest possible way so not to spend alot of time on something that might not even work. So I drilled a hole in my front lower fork stantion. It was only a 4mm hole, so I was not concerned with the hole if it did not work. Sure enough it does not work well. It was impossible to see the turning radius completely without getting the whole thing mounted and in working condition. The turning was greatly reduced because of the just installed EVOTECH radiator guards. 2D racing has some work to do in figuring out how to get around the clearance issues if the K67 has radiator guards in place too.

Install try number 2. I already saw the compression and rebound in the TFT cluster and I was like 'yes' .. success at least on getting the ECU to see the sensor. So I decided that in the front of the fork tube was next. This location is not ideal because alot of bugs, rocks, birds, and whatever else might fly up off the road can hit the sensor really easy now. I decided its got to mount somehow. So I swing the top bracket around, and the lower needs to be drilled again. This time I decide to thread tap the hole M4 and screw the stand off in there and attachment ball. This worked really well. Wish I had threaded the other hole M4 and you would barely see it and just thought it was a factory hole.

As you can see in the pics, both sides of the tube I show you.

Does it make a difference in the ride? Not exactly like it does on the K46. I am not sure why, but in my 140 miles of testing today, the squat off the corner reaction was not the same as the K46. I am sure it is due to the swing arm type and how it is designed to react to start with. Maybe the code is different and an update is coming. The ECU does see the sensor and provide the compression and rebound now at least.








Its like me however, I own the

2020 K67 ///M Programmed XWORKS ECU by me
2018 K46 RCK3 / HP Power Kit'ed ECU by me
2017 K46 RCK3 / HP Power Kit'ed ECU by me
2015 K46 RCK3 / HP Power Kit'ed ECU by me
2014 K46 RCK2 / HP Power Kit'ed ECU by me

all these have their place in use, but I really enjoy the K67 overall on the track. You just got to have a ECU resolution to really enjoy the power.
How did you end up mounting the bottom? I understand the top bracket that is upside down, but what is the bottom bracket or mount look like. I installed my sensor and hate how it limits the turning radius for street riding. So I want to flip mine around to the front side of the fork and just trim the inside of the fairing so it will clear the path but cant figure out how the bottom mount would work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 · (Edited)
How did you end up mounting the bottom? I understand the top bracket that is upside down, but what is the bottom bracket or mount look like. I installed my sensor and hate how it limits the turning radius for street riding. So I want to flip mine around to the front side of the fork and just trim the inside of the fairing so it will clear the path but cant figure out how the bottom mount would work.
Drill and tap a hole in the fork stantion. Lots of material there to make this small hole and tap.

Then clearance the top of the fender so the sensor has working room. I did not want to move the sensor out since it is already in the front side it can pick up a rock if you are following someone. I am lead on all the rides I am typically on so I did not have to worry about this issue really. I put over 7000 miles on this setup while running the DDC suspension. Now I have Ohlins in all my K67 and K66. The sensor can be used with Ohlins for track tuning, but I just removed the sensor for now. It does work great with the DDC however.

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Drill and tap a hole in the fork stantion. Lots of material there to make this small hole and tap.

Then clearance the top of the fender so the sensor has working room. I did not want to move the sensor out since it is already in the front side it can pick up a rock if you are following someone. I am lead on all the rides I am typically on so I did not have to worry about this issue really. I put over 7000 miles on this setup while running the DDC suspension. Now I have Ohlins in all my K67 and K66. The sensor can be used with Ohlins for track tuning, but I just removed the sensor for now. It does work work great with the DDC however.

View attachment 222222
Ah.. Ok. That makes sense. Thank you.

Yea my other bikes have full Ohlins as well. However I am really hoping to make this DDC work for my k67 street bike because I like the idea of quick changes on the fly when street riding. The amount of steering range restriction was a bit surprising with the sensor in place.
 

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Drill and tap a hole in the fork stantion. Lots of material there to make this small hole and tap.

Then clearance the top of the fender so the sensor has working room. I did not want to move the sensor out since it is already in the front side it can pick up a rock if you are following someone. I am lead on all the rides I am typically on so I did not have to worry about this issue really. I put over 7000 miles on this setup while running the DDC suspension. Now I have Ohlins in all my K67 and K66. The sensor can be used with Ohlins for track tuning, but I just removed the sensor for now. It does work great with the DDC however.

View attachment 222222
Didn't you put a CF tube over it at one point? What are the dimensions of that tube I want one.
 

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*TLDR: This is only relevant if you're using the 2D data logger.

Quick update after going to the track. Data logger was only showing 50mm of front travel even though I was using all the travel. I had to go into the communication with the data logger to re-calibrate the values. If you need to do this it's channel #21 in the cal 1 table, labeled as DDC_displacement_fr, NOT susp-f. I used 0mm as the lower value and 120mm as the upper. I may change this and put the ball mount on the lower hole of the lower mount to get a little more travel range from the sensor. As is with the forks flush at the top tripple and the sensor ball mounted on the upper/bottom mount hole it's exactly 120mm of travel. This will make sense as you go through the calibration steps and get a feel for the range of motion on the sensor.

To do this I raised the bike on the headlift stand to get the minimum (0mm) value with the front suspension fully extended, detached the bottom ball mount of the sensor and moved it all the way up for the maximum (120mm) value.

Open WinARace

- Go to F2 / communication

- Press ctrl-alt-k to change to full user interface

- Open the channel tree on the left side of the window

- Go to CAN-in

- You see the channel grid on the right

- Choose the susp-f channel

- Make a right mouse click and go to automatic calibration

- Pull out the rod completely and read the minimum physical vale

- Pull the sensor completely in and read the maximum physical value

- Then key in 0mm at lower physical value and 150mm at upper physical value
 

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Anyone have a clue on where to source a plug to fit the OEM harness for the sensor? I have a 175mm sensor and instead of cutting the plug off the loom id like to use the intended connector. Anyone point me in the right direction as its not the standard accessory plug. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
I do not understand what you are trying to do. The sensor has a plug on it that plugs into the OEM harness of the S1000RR. Is the 175mm sensor you have not the standard 2D racing version?
 
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