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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 2017 with cast wheels which is coded and came with 190/55 rear tire. I would like to try the Metzeler TD slicks. The problem is Metzeler does not sell the 190/55 in North America for some strange reason. Closest fit is either 180/60 or 200/55.
Which would be a better pick? It is for trackdays advanced group. Coming from Dunlop Q4, trying to get something cheaper with similar performance. No warmers. Anybody has experience with these? Thanks.
 

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Metzeler TD 200 will be my choice. And you don't want a 180 on s1k rear wheel.
 
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Look at the numbers the best way to understand this.

Pirelli did not make a 190 years ago and I was at a track asking the tire dealer why they did not have a 190 series. He indicated some interesting details that the 180/60 was created to compete with the 190 series, but, depending on what application of the track you are looking for in performance, a 180/60 is excellent. So the real comparison is then from the 180 to the 200 in the numbers... The 180 weight in rotation was better on off corner acceleration, the diameter difference creates DTC issues at lean angles if your software calibration is at 190 and not the 200, this is not at straight up 0-10 degrees. When you start to look at the profile of the lean angle diameters there is huge difference. So you see the DTC flashing more at 30-60 degrees lean angles. So this effects the tip in, and the pick up off corners also.

The sidewall height is the same. The Width is what bothers many people, but they fail to understand that 7.9 minus 7.1 is .8 difference, but that is divided by 2 so that it is thought of as a piece on each side from centerline making it .4. So .4 is just under half inch, but of course slightly over a 1/4 inch. When you really look at 200 after a good session you will notice that 1/4 inch is not being used. At 58 degrees lean angle, most people will never see 58 degrees. I can get 58 on the streets no problem, but most are lucky to see 48-52 on the streets. At the track I do 58-60 all day on a 180/60 tire. Even once, and I am so lucky that at 61 degrees, I did not crash and pushed the front end 2 feet, the rear never stepped out.

There is always try guys. You read all this info online from people that never even see big lean angles much less actually test all various types of tire sizes. I have used all the sizes to see how I feel about it. The 200 just jacks the rear up to me, and I dont like the feel of that size. However, there are those that read and think the 200 is the way for them and that is fine, because were the rubber meets the road, you better have alot of confidence if you plan to ride hard and on the edge.. literally on the edge of the tire.

Then being the 180/60 is compared to the 200/55

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Look at the numbers the best way to understand this.

Pirelli did not make a 190 years ago and I was at a track asking the tire dealer why they did not have a 190 series. He indicated some interesting details that the 180/60 was created to compete with the 190 series, but, depending on what application of the track you are looking for in performance, a 180/60 is excellent. So the real comparison is then from the 180 to the 200 in the numbers... The 180 weight in rotation was better on off corner acceleration, the diameter difference creates DTC issues at lean angles if your software calibration is at 190 and not the 200, this is not at straight up 0-10 degrees. When you start to look at the profile of the lean angle diameters there is huge difference. So you see the DTC flashing more at 30-60 degrees lean angles. So this effects the tip in, and the pick up off corners also.

The sidewall height is the same. The Width is what bothers many people, but they fail to understand that 7.9 minus 7.1 is .8 difference, but that is divided by 2 so that it is thought of as a piece on each side from centerline making it .4. So .4 is just under half inch, but of course slightly over a 1/4 inch. When you really look at 200 after a good session you will notice that 1/4 inch is not being used. At 58 degrees lean angle, most people will never see 58 degrees. I can get 58 on the streets no problem, but most are lucky to see 48-52 on the streets. At the track I do 58-60 all day on a 180/60 tire. Even once, and I am so lucky that at 61 degrees, I did not crash and pushed the front end 2 feet, the rear never stepped out.

There is always try guys. You read all this info online from people that never even see big lean angles much less actually test all various types of tire sizes. I have used all the sizes to see how I feel about it. The 200 just jacks the rear up to me, and I dont like the feel of that size. However, there are those that read and think the 200 is the way for them and that is fine, because were the rubber meets the road, you better have alot of confidence if you plan to ride hard and on the edge.. literally on the edge of the tire.

Then being the 180/60 is compared to the 200/55

View attachment 222207
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If I understood correctly no DTC issues with the 180/60, since the diameter is the same as 190/55, but I have to be easier on the gas when accelerating due to reduced contact patch. DTC would come on earlier with the 200, because larger diameter and bike geometry will also change. It sounds like it is less complicated to stick with Q4 until Metzeler decides to bring the 190/55 from Europe. The difference is about $100 per set in my area.
 
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