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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-14-2019 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedfinn View Post
Usually front linear potentiometer total stroke is 150 mm and input voltage is 5000 mV -> output signal is 5000 mV/150 mm = 33.33 mV/ mm.
If we assume that the actual front suspension stroke, 120 mm, is in the middle of the linear potentiometer stroke, then the actual suspension stroke is from (150-120)/2 = 15 mm to 120+15 = 135 mm.
15 mm * 33.33 mV/ mm = 500 mV
135 mm * 33.33 mV/ mm = 4500 mV
So usually front sensor readings should usually be between 500 and 4500 mV.
And for example 2500 mV/ 33.33 mV/mm = 75 mm in potentiometer stroke -> and 75 mm - 15 mm = 60 mm in suspension stroke.
I was thinking of doing the conversion like that and logging that and the other data from a ride via the GS911. Then graphing it to see if I can learn anything about what DDC is doing.
04-14-2019 12:49 PM
speedfinn Usually front linear potentiometer total stroke is 150 mm and input voltage is 5000 mV -> output signal is 5000 mV/150 mm = 33.33 mV/ mm.
If we assume that the actual front suspension stroke, 120 mm, is in the middle of the linear potentiometer stroke, then the actual suspension stroke is from (150-120)/2 = 15 mm to 120+15 = 135 mm.
15 mm * 33.33 mV/ mm = 500 mV
135 mm * 33.33 mV/ mm = 4500 mV
So usually front sensor readings should usually be between 500 and 4500 mV.
And for example 2500 mV/ 33.33 mV/mm = 75 mm in potentiometer stroke -> and 75 mm - 15 mm = 60 mm in suspension stroke.
04-14-2019 12:08 PM
[email protected]
2D sensor question

I have the 2D sensor and a GS911. I was playing around with the 911 and looking at the real time values function in the semi active suspension functions. I was wondering what values it shows and if I could learn anything interesting by using it to log those values.

But anyway. I noticed that there's a voltage figure connected to the front 2D sensor which changes as the sensor moves. Makes sense. Theres also front and rear ride height. They're both at zero with the bike stood up with no weight on it. When I get on the rear ride height reads about 14mm but the front value stays at 0. Nothing will change the front ride height. I had just adjusted sag so I did recalibrate afterward. The voltage output for the front does change which means to me that the sensor is working. I just thought it odd that there is a field shown for front ride height and it doesn't change.

Is there some other switch that needs to be thrown, figuratively speaking, to get the bike to fully recognize the front sensor. I did get the individual compression and rebound adjustment in the front. Can anyone say if something doesn't sound right.

If its of interest heres what the GS911 reads for the suspension

Suspension adjust Swith (active or not)
Some other switches - same (active or not)
Front EDC Valve Current - mA
Rear EDC Valve Current - mA
Front EDC PWM - %
Rear EDC PWM - %
Front Height Sensor Adaptation - mm
Rear Height Sensor Adaptation - mm
Front Sensor non-linearized value - mV
Rear Sensor non-linearized value - mV
Front Ride Height - mm
Rear Ride Height - mm

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