U-haul Cargo Trailer Track Day Setup...? - Page 5 - BMW S1000RR Forums: BMW Sportbike Forum
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post #41 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 08:34 PM
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Did SRO send you a bottle of wine?

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post #42 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 08:45 PM
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You from DFW?
Looks like Grapevine on your tire cover.
Large bit from down there, on here.
Yes, I'm currently in DFW. Bought my S1000RR here and my cousin just bought that Jeep.
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post #43 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 11:39 PM
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I'm officially done with uhaul trailers. At 30 bucks a pop, 10 track days at year, its just not worth the price. The motorcycle trailer has been stable and useful, but I just dont have time for the additional 2 hours it takes to pick up and drop off. The check in/check out process at my uhaul is always a pain. But I might get into some novice racing this season, so I'll be tracking much more than usual. As far as what I used to do, I would just use 2" webbing, around the forks and rear foot pegs like shown in the manual. It has always worked well for me. Just enough pressure for nearly half way down the front shocks, and about an inch and a half of compression on the rear. You have to figure out a way to rig the front fork straps as close as possible to the wheel. If you move them further (laterally - X axis from riders perspective) from the bike, it can start putting stress on the plastics (no bueno) - if that makes sense. Imagine a triangle from vertical at the forks to the tie down point. The sharper (smaller) the angle at the top of the triangle - vertically from the fork to the tie down - the better (within reason, you still want some lateral support).
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post #44 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 12:56 AM
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If a dedicated trailer isn't an option, the plywood can be used as a pseudo floor to which the restraint can be mounted. I trailered a bike 500 miles in a uhaul enclosed trailer with no issues whatsoever.

It was probably overkill but I used a baxley chock in the front and a pitbull trailer restraint mounted to two sheets of 3/4" plywood. I didn't use any straps on the bike itself. The only things touching the bike were the restraint system on the real axle, the chock on the front tire, and obviously the tires on the plywood.

The two sheets of plywood were staggered so one sheet was against the left side of the trailer and the other against the right side. I screwed the two sheets of plywood together to make them act as one piece. The trailer did have hooks at the bottom of the walls that allowed me to use straps to keep the plywood secure to the trailer floor and from sliding towards the rear of the trailer. There are multiple options for running the straps to keep the plywood from any fore/aft movement. I could have found a way to use one sheet of plywood and used a couple boards the width of the trailer to prevent side to side movement of the plywood, but the restraint hardware is too long. Shorter bolts could have solved that issue. I needed a one time solution, and that's what I came up with.

The prep (measuring, drilling) and setup took some time. Subsequent uses wouldn't take as long, but would still be quite a bit of hassle compared to a dedicated trailer with the restraint mounted directly to the floor. I should have taken pictures, but I didn't.
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post #45 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-25-2017, 01:37 PM Thread Starter
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I'm thinking a single pc of 3/4" plywood and straps to the rear of the bike only to keep the plywood from sliding around. I know a MotoAmerica team that uses PB TRSs for (4) bikes with no chocks or straps of any kind.

I guess another way to go would be to add anchor points to the plywood and strap it to the D-rings in the floor and put nothing on the bike... This would probably make getting in and out of the trailer and loading other stuff a lot easier.

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If a dedicated trailer isn't an option, the plywood can be used as a pseudo floor to which the restraint can be mounted. I trailered a bike 500 miles in a uhaul enclosed trailer with no issues whatsoever.

It was probably overkill but I used a baxley chock in the front and a pitbull trailer restraint mounted to two sheets of 3/4" plywood. I didn't use any straps on the bike itself. The only things touching the bike were the restraint system on the real axle, the chock on the front tire, and obviously the tires on the plywood.

The two sheets of plywood were staggered so one sheet was against the left side of the trailer and the other against the right side. I screwed the two sheets of plywood together to make them act as one piece. The trailer did have hooks at the bottom of the walls that allowed me to use straps to keep the plywood secure to the trailer floor and from sliding towards the rear of the trailer. There are multiple options for running the straps to keep the plywood from any fore/aft movement. I could have found a way to use one sheet of plywood and used a couple boards the width of the trailer to prevent side to side movement of the plywood, but the restraint hardware is too long. Shorter bolts could have solved that issue. I needed a one time solution, and that's what I came up with.

The prep (measuring, drilling) and setup took some time. Subsequent uses wouldn't take as long, but would still be quite a bit of hassle compared to a dedicated trailer with the restraint mounted directly to the floor. I should have taken pictures, but I didn't.
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post #46 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 03:35 AM
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I just saw this bike hauler, very interesting and economical. Wonder if anyone has tried this?
https://youtu.be/ADUuszQxJEE


Paul
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post #47 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by pchao View Post
I just saw this bike hauler, very interesting and economical. Wonder if anyone has tried this?
https://youtu.be/ADUuszQxJEE


Paul
You are kidding right? Just run some ratchet straps around the triple and drag the damn thing down the road on it's side.


I bought a knock-off Kendon last year. Been a great trailer.

https://theusatrailerstore.com/trini...e-trailer-mt3/


Last edited by the_gooch; 03-27-2017 at 11:23 AM.
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post #48 of 55 (permalink) Old 04-15-2017, 08:05 PM
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Ignition on for DDC models.
Finally getting my bike shipped to Austin in a few days so I was reading up on whether or not to have the ignition on for DDC when strapping it down. Some here suggest that this should be done, but if it is that important, wouldn't it be in the manual?
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post #49 of 55 (permalink) Old 04-16-2017, 12:52 AM
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Originally Posted by pchao View Post
I just saw this bike hauler, very interesting and economical. Wonder if anyone has tried this?
https://youtu.be/ADUuszQxJEE


Paul

No way...

There was a guy once at the track, he had a sort of platform that was the width of the motorcycle attached along the back of his truck, or Jeep, I can't remember exactly, and the bike was on that, basically the way you see people hauling bicycles on the back of cars. Now, I don't know how he got it on, but I helped him get it off and it was really really hard. It took us 30 min to get it down and if it falls over it could be game over, all the time wasted to get to the track, get prepared, everything.

Maybe for 1 day/year it's ok, but it's not worth it if you go several times to put up with all that or what can happen from some semi-solution - in my opinion of course.
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post #50 of 55 (permalink) Old 04-16-2017, 01:08 AM
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Originally Posted by dochp View Post
I'm officially done with uhaul trailers. At 30 bucks a pop, 10 track days at year, its just not worth the price. The motorcycle trailer has been stable and useful, but I just dont have time for the additional 2 hours it takes to pick up and drop off. The check in/check out process at my uhaul is always a pain. But I might get into some novice racing this season, so I'll be tracking much more than usual. As far as what I used to do, I would just use 2" webbing, around the forks and rear foot pegs like shown in the manual. It has always worked well for me. Just enough pressure for nearly half way down the front shocks, and about an inch and a half of compression on the rear. You have to figure out a way to rig the front fork straps as close as possible to the wheel. If you move them further (laterally - X axis from riders perspective) from the bike, it can start putting stress on the plastics (no bueno) - if that makes sense. Imagine a triangle from vertical at the forks to the tie down point. The sharper (smaller) the angle at the top of the triangle - vertically from the fork to the tie down - the better (within reason, you still want some lateral support).
I used to rent u-haul motorcycle trailers too, and the time wasted comes back to haunt you. It's cheap, but it's not worth the time spent waiting after people, going there, taking it back etc. You can do the online reservation, check-in and all that, and it goes faster, but you still have to wait for everybody ahead of you, and it just takes forever for 1 person. Plus the mentioned take it home, take it back part with all the loading/unloading.

For holding the bike in place, I used to use a canyon dancer for the front wheel and the wheel was in a Baxley chock as well. The straps hooked up to the canyon dancer ends and to the now ex-rear foot pegs in the back, re purposed for hooking up the straps. I did this for 10 years or so.

However, with your own trailer I found the Pit Bull trailer restraint system (and probably there are some clones/variations of this system) is much better. It's expensive (around $300), but it lasts forever. You drill some holes, mount a base in the trailer, open, closed trailer, it doesn't matter (there are ways to not drill through the trailer floor but hook up the base anyway), and the bike hooks up to this base with some pins that connect to the rear axle.

It needs different pins for connecting to the axle for different motorcycles, but everything else stays the same. Some fit on more that 1 brand of motorcycles, for example the r1 pins also fit the bmw in my case.

That is all that is needed, it doesn't even need anything in the front, and no straps, no compression of the suspension at all. I think it works great.
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