accelerating during a turn for maximum stability - Page 3 - BMW S1000RR Forums: BMW Sportbike Forum
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Old 01-01-2013, 02:18 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamisou View Post
Not necessarily accelerating, more maintaining drive throughout that stabilizes the bike.
That is indeed my vision on the matter too.

You either use engine braking (and if necessary assisted by abusing the front brake to 'brake into' the corner), or accelerate out of of the corner. Avoid/learn never to get into a throttle on/throttle off/throttle on/throttle off situation. This results in a very unstable bike. Either brake, or accelerate.

Of course there is always an unknown corner if you're just touring along some nice road. That's where you will, at times, find yourself doing the thing i just told you not to. But that's normal. You don't know how fast you can go around the corner, but you want to take it as fast as you dare to anyway. Completely normal. But just remember, if you are aiming at getting around that one corner you already know, hanging on and off the throttle is not the way to go.

Last edited by MasterTommy NL; 01-01-2013 at 02:22 AM.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:59 PM   #22 (permalink)
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If you're talking about a single apex corner. Ideally you begin trailbraking and leaning towards the apex, whilst gradually reducing brake force with addition of lean angle until you meet the center of the apex, at which point it's gradual lean angle reduction with increase of throttle. You wanna carry enough corner speed so that the bike is pulling you around the track and you are using as much of the width of the track as possible.

It's essentially an inversely proportional relationship between lean angle and gas and brakes.

The fastest guys, are the smoothest guys. If you're not on the brakes, you're on the gas. If it's a sweeper, then maintain the maximum possible constant acceleration and lean angle. Smooth = faster.
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:18 PM   #23 (permalink)
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I am by no means a pro, I have done a few track days and rider training days, basically all the above answers are correct, as you lean more the more speed you loose, the main thing is that if you are off the throttle in a turn the weight is up front therefore making the steering heavy and the bike feeling unstable.
If you go and practice in a empty car park and start the turn without throttle and then apply some throttle the bike stabilises and rides you thought it. I brake coming into the corner then on turn in apply a little throttle which shifts the weight to the back then apply more throttle on the exit, it's all about keeping the weight off the front. One other thing the more throttle the more the bike wants to stand up so if you find yourself leaning too much for the turn apply some more throttle and it will bring you back into line.


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Old 01-14-2013, 01:38 PM   #24 (permalink)
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I didn't get a chance to read everything in this thread but I wanted to say this:

Good throttle control also helps with maintaining a predictable line. Contrary to what a lot of people think, if you follow Keith Code’s throttle control rule number one, "once the gas is cracked on it is rolled smoothly, evenly and consistently throughout the remainder of the turn," then you will have a predictable, consistent and smooth line through a corner. Rolling on the gas does not make the bike run wide. The bike will only run wide if you apply the gas too much, too early in a corner or before the bike is fully turned.

The other important thing to note is that you do not need to "Hold" the bike on its line or continue to steer the bike throughout the entire corner. You countersteer the bike into the turn and provided you have good throttle control you can release pressure on that inside bar. You steer into the turn and you steer out of the turn but during the corner you can release pressure on the handlebar. Rolling on the throttle will hold the bike at the arc that you set it on. The bike will maintain that same line until you steer out of it.

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Old 02-09-2013, 10:33 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Noam,

You are over thinking this. Gravity and drag slow you down, so cracking and maintaining speed is by definition, accelerating. You don't have to increase speed to be under acceleration. Once you change your speed, lean angle or wheelbase, now your line will change.
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Old 02-10-2013, 05:31 PM   #26 (permalink)
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I drive very simple.
on speedy-straight corners I don't lean to maximum I just try to slide.
on large radius corners I never actually leave the throttle to zero except when I donw shift. After that I am on the throttle much before apex. Braking and throttle don't go separate very long in the corners.
one more tip: try to accelerate from the back of the curve not on the quick entry unless you play a defensive role.
I always say thyat I need to open the throttle much much earlier but in an elegant way. sometime I just dont let it go to zero even give some sparks especially with new tires.
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:05 PM   #27 (permalink)
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I'll ask you guys as it seems related to the topic. I was getting confused about this myself and a guy told me when it comes to cornering to stop thinking of the throttle as a way to manage speed. And think of it as a way to manage torque.

Of course i never saw that guy again. It did help but i always felt like i was on the verge of an insight he deliberately left for me to figure out for myself. But I'm going to cheat and ask
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Old 02-19-2013, 02:39 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by misti View Post
I didn't get a chance to read everything in this thread but I wanted to say this:

Good throttle control also helps with maintaining a predictable line. Contrary to what a lot of people think, if you follow Keith Code’s throttle control rule number one, "once the gas is cracked on it is rolled smoothly, evenly and consistently throughout the remainder of the turn," then you will have a predictable, consistent and smooth line through a corner. Rolling on the gas does not make the bike run wide. The bike will only run wide if you apply the gas too much, too early in a corner or before the bike is fully turned.

The other important thing to note is that you do not need to "Hold" the bike on its line or continue to steer the bike throughout the entire corner. You countersteer the bike into the turn and provided you have good throttle control you can release pressure on that inside bar. You steer into the turn and you steer out of the turn but during the corner you can release pressure on the handlebar. Rolling on the throttle will hold the bike at the arc that you set it on. The bike will maintain that same line until you steer out of it.

Misti
Characteristics of a good line:

1. Follows Keith Code's Throttle Control Rule
2. Uses only ONE steering input
3. Straightens the corner as much as possible
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:40 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfred.Rodriguez View Post
Characteristics of a good line:

1. Follows Keith Code's Throttle Control Rule
2. Uses only ONE steering input
3. Straightens the corner as much as possible
You sound like one of the coaches now!! Again, glad you had a good time at the school and I'm glad you are retaining the info and putting it to good use!
Cheers and ride safe!

Misti
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:44 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by misti View Post
You sound like one of the coaches now!! Again, glad you had a good time at the school and I'm glad you are retaining the info and putting it to good use!
Cheers and ride safe!

Misti
Hahahaha!!!
Thanks!!!

Yeah - those two days were so much fun, and so much educational...
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