Pazzo vs CRG vs HP Levers?? - Page 2 - BMW S1000RR Forums: BMW Sportbike Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-10-2012, 05:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 220
Shorty brake - definitely a difference (you get more leverage on the outside of the lever and since it's shorter, easier to get that leverage with one or two fingers). I would also argue that the same happens with the clutch (I believe that the "standard" size Pazzo/CRG are actually shorter than stock so the same also applies). . .They look way better than stock, but they do also have a valid purpose. . .
motorkas is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-10-2012, 06:23 PM
Senior Member
 
ripcord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 156
Put ASVs on my R1... very good fit and finish but the Company was abysmal in providing product information. Had to send multiple enquires before I got a response.

Bought Folding CRGs intended for a S1000RR... but now will be going on my HP4.

Super quality in my view.
ripcord is offline  
post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-10-2012, 07:04 PM
Site Sponsor
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 216
Pazzo and CRG are pretty much on par. I'd say take a look at ASVs, they're pretty sweet and they're pretty much one of the originators. I've seen HP levers on a customer's bike, never really rode with 'em, but they look pretty sweet.

TBH, shorts are shorts and longs are longs... it's pretty much splitting hairs so long as you get a set of levers from a reputable company it just boils down to which you think look the nicest.
Brian@ccbmw is offline  
post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 12:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NewDelhi,India
Posts: 371
Pazzo for me, for the choice of colour and adjustibility

S1000RR 2011 Motor Sports
Ducati 848 Evo [Sold]
Yamaha R1 08 [Sold]
Yamaha R1 01 [Sold]
yuvraj8511 is offline  
post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 08:33 PM
Senior Member
 
Taylor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 347
I've owned 10 pair of pazzos on different bikes, always loved them, now I have the hp4 with the HP levers and they are sweet! I really really like them, but man are they expensive.

2010 Mineral Silver S1KRR-Sold
2012 Motosports. S1KRR-Sold
2013 HP4 Competition #0373-Sold
Taylor is offline  
post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 09:35 AM
Senior Member
 
9mmkungfu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 836
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
I've owned 10 pair of pazzos on different bikes, always loved them, now I have the hp4 with the HP levers and they are sweet! I really really like them, but man are they expensive.
How do the HP levers compare?
9mmkungfu is offline  
post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 02:36 PM
Senior Member
 
Taylor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 347
I like the feel better, the pazzos have a squareness feel to them. The hp feels more round, adjust better, look cooler to me. Dont get me wrong I love pazzo to, mg buddy sells them and I get them at cost so I always use them. Just nice to try something different

2010 Mineral Silver S1KRR-Sold
2012 Motosports. S1KRR-Sold
2013 HP4 Competition #0373-Sold
Taylor is offline  
post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 03:18 PM
Member
 
Wolfgang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fbto View Post
And why did you guys change from the stock? Pure looks? Or is the feel really exist? Or more in your mind?
Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com Free App
Some of the higher end brake and clutch levers use ball bearings in their pivots rather than brass or steel bushings, that the OEM set use. They're inherently smoother than stock, but it depends on how sensitive you are to lever feel. Personally, I think they work best as a package, when you replace your stock brake lines (with kevlar or stainless), levers and of course brake fluid, which I change every few months anyway. The stock pads are plenty powerful for the street. But they do seem to kick off a lot of dust. I haven't addressed the brakes on my S1 yet. I'm still building up enough milage to get its 600-mi. service completed. But, then I'll start "tearing into it," probably starting at the brakes, then suspension, wheels, etc.

Keep in mind, if your bike has ABS (most do), some of the "universal levers will not work." If you're replacing the brake lines (highly recommended, even more so than replacing the levers and usually a bit less expensive), make sure you get a kit marked ABS or a kit market non-ABS, depending on your bike. It's easy to miss that distinction, especially if the dealer you're buying from only sells the kit for non-abs or the abs equipped bike. If in doubt call the vendor before ordering. .

Keep in mind an OEM brake lever alone has a $300 MSRP from the dealer. You can find it slightly (or in some cases, incredibly) cheaper elsewhere. Unfortunately, it appears a lot of 2010-2012 bike have hit the deck, but have done so on only one side, etc. So, I've seen quite a few right side or left side levers being sold by unfortunate S1 owners, as of late. But, if you need an OEM brake or clutch lever and you spy one on eBay, jump on it. They go quickly. On the other hand, if your bike has tipped over from a standstill or you need replacement levers for other a different reason, you're better off going with aftermarket units, from a functional and financial standpoint.

Aftermarket levers higher quality, usually provide more adjustability, and, yes, they do look cool. But, I can feel the difference between a a stock lever and an aftermarket/upgraded lever. It's money well spent. But, it's not exactly required money. If your levers are fine, than from a performance standpoint you're better off saving up for a set of wheels or an Ohlins fork cartridge (for your OEM forks), or even brake lines.

That's my $0.02.

Ride safe all,
Wolfgang
Wolfgang is offline  
post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Fbto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang View Post
Some of the higher end brake and clutch levers use ball bearings in their pivots rather than brass or steel bushings, that the OEM set use. They're inherently smoother than stock, but it depends on how sensitive you are to lever feel. Personally, I think they work best as a package, when you replace your stock brake lines (with kevlar or stainless), levers and of course brake fluid, which I change every few months anyway. The stock pads are plenty powerful for the street. But they do seem to kick off a lot of dust. I haven't addressed the brakes on my S1 yet. I'm still building up enough milage to get its 600-mi. service completed. But, then I'll start "tearing into it," probably starting at the brakes, then suspension, wheels, etc.

Keep in mind, if your bike has ABS (most do), some of the "universal levers will not work." If you're replacing the brake lines (highly recommended, even more so than replacing the levers and usually a bit less expensive), make sure you get a kit marked ABS or a kit market non-ABS, depending on your bike. It's easy to miss that distinction, especially if the dealer you're buying from only sells the kit for non-abs or the abs equipped bike. If in doubt call the vendor before ordering. .

Keep in mind an OEM brake lever alone has a $300 MSRP from the dealer. You can find it slightly (or in some cases, incredibly) cheaper elsewhere. Unfortunately, it appears a lot of 2010-2012 bike have hit the deck, but have done so on only one side, etc. So, I've seen quite a few right side or left side levers being sold by unfortunate S1 owners, as of late. But, if you need an OEM brake or clutch lever and you spy one on eBay, jump on it. They go quickly. On the other hand, if your bike has tipped over from a standstill or you need replacement levers for other a different reason, you're better off going with aftermarket units, from a functional and financial standpoint.

Aftermarket levers higher quality, usually provide more adjustability, and, yes, they do look cool. But, I can feel the difference between a a stock lever and an aftermarket/upgraded lever. It's money well spent. But, it's not exactly required money. If your levers are fine, than from a performance standpoint you're better off saving up for a set of wheels or an Ohlins fork cartridge (for your OEM forks), or even brake lines.

That's my $0.02.

Ride safe all,
Wolfgang
Thanks for the great info Wolfgang!

Which brings up another question. I didn't check. Does the HP4 have braided lines? Steel?




Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com Free App

2013 BMW HP4 #2710
2013 BMW HP4 #0162 (STOLEN JUNE 17, 2014!!!)
2010 MB C63 AMG PERF PLUS (For Sale! )
2005 HONDA CR125 (Sold)
2003 SUZUKI GSXR 600 - track toy (For Sale!)
Fbto is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW S1000RR Forums: BMW Sportbike Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome